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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 264309 times)

dross99_si

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1200 on: January 21, 2019, 11:18:43 PM »
Both of the above appear to have powdery mildew, the most common mango malady during cool dry weather.

Fertilizing with Gypsum / Calcium Sulfate is usually also a good idea.

Thank you Har!

dross99_si

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1201 on: January 22, 2019, 07:35:39 AM »
Little bit of leaf tip burn on our potted Pickering, Haden and Coconut Cream. Definitely hard to surmise what may be the cause. Wind, water logged, salts, chlorine, over fert, nutrient deficiency, etc..
We use Osmocote plus and a little foliar feed now & then. Once in a while water from the hose. I did order the Boogie Blue Plus for a little peace of mind when having to hose water.
Not sure if I should just do nothing and see how it plays out or run the risk of overthinking and wind up doing too much and possibly make things worse.
I thought about adding some gypsum to remedy any salt build up, add a little calcium and possibly aid in drainage.
So many variables when container growing. Wish I could just put them in the ground. I feel like it would make life easier.












Unless it's from the homemade fungicidal spray I made and applied last week using water, vegetable oil and baking soda. Could that have caused the tips turn brown? Like a sunburn from excess oil residue maybe? I did apply the spray late at night...
« Last Edit: January 22, 2019, 07:37:55 AM by dross99_si »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1202 on: January 22, 2019, 12:07:25 PM »
Possible.  Sodium in excess?  I haven't tried that mix.  How much baking soda per gallon?  How much oil?
Har

dross99_si

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1203 on: January 22, 2019, 12:38:14 PM »
Possible.  Sodium in excess?  I haven't tried that mix.  How much baking soda per gallon?  How much oil?

Hi Har,
In one gallon of water I mixed: 2 Tbsp baking soda, 2 Tbsp vegetable oil and just enough eco friendly dish soap to emulsify the oil when the mixture was agitated. Perhaps I used too much baking soda and the excessive amount of sodium burned the leaf tips  >:( Next time I will only use 1 Tbsp baking soda.
Also, next time I was considering using neem oil instead of vegetable oil.
I'm trying everything I can to keep this powdery mildew at bay.
I may try a copper spray eventually, but the toxicity from excess use has me reluctant to do so.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1204 on: January 22, 2019, 01:07:02 PM »
The amount of oil was correct;  I'm not sure about the baking soda, but that sounds amount sounds reasonable.

Neem is also a vegetable oil.  Food-grade whole neem oil is available.

Excess accumulation of Copper is highly unlikely if you alternate sprays and follow today's careful labeling.  The main exception is when growing on soils where groves used to be subjected to "more-is-better" style, promoted by product sellers who wanted to move more product.
Har

dross99_si

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1205 on: January 22, 2019, 02:16:42 PM »
Thanks Har. Always a pleasure to get a response from you.
In the future I will try decreasing the amount of baking soda to 1 Tbsp/gal.
I picked up some Southern Ag Neem oil from the local store. Hopefully that brand is ok.
I appreciate the info on the copper spray as well.

-Andy

Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1206 on: January 23, 2019, 04:57:27 AM »
hello everybody
Im in kuwait and 5 days ago we had a cold windy weather . One of my mango trees was positioned in a bad windy place it was planted one month and a half ago . It has a huge flowering and good health until we had that cold windy weather 5 days ago as i mentioned . Since that the flowers started to die and get dry . See the pics . Anyone has an idea about this ??







Please any idea about this problem ?

My tree looks like it is getting dried everyday . looks like there is a problem with roots because of the stronge wind

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1207 on: January 23, 2019, 10:23:13 AM »
Powdery mildew.
Har

Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1208 on: January 23, 2019, 06:40:10 PM »
Powdery mildew.

Thanks for the reply Har

But i dont see any thing about Powdery mildew on my tree . What is going on now is flowers withering with no sing of Powdery mildew at all . Is this another kind of Powdery mildew?

And what the solution ?


Gambit

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1209 on: January 23, 2019, 06:57:46 PM »
"But i dont see any thing about Powdery mildew on my tree . What is going on now is flowers withering with no sing of Powdery mildew at all . Is this another kind of Powdery mildew?"


Looks like cold damage, especially on the highest blooms. My tree showed the same damage after a short freeze last January in St. Pete.


Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1210 on: January 23, 2019, 11:09:35 PM »
"But i dont see any thing about Powdery mildew on my tree . What is going on now is flowers withering with no sing of Powdery mildew at all . Is this another kind of Powdery mildew?"


Looks like cold damage, especially on the highest blooms. My tree showed the same damage after a short freeze last January in St. Pete.


exactly that was what happened to my tree it looks just like the pic u attached  thanks alot Gambit .
But did u lose all the blooms ? Did try to do something to save your tree ?

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1211 on: January 24, 2019, 08:46:48 AM »
Good picture Gambit.

The browned leaves and stem are frost damaged, and the drooping of the bloom spikes is presumably from cold stress.  One can also see Anthracnose.
Har

Gambit

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1212 on: January 24, 2019, 05:42:45 PM »
Good picture Gambit.

The browned leaves and stem are frost damaged, and the drooping of the bloom spikes is presumably from cold stress.  One can also see Anthracnose.

Oh yes, drooping blooms were from the freeze. And all my mango trees show signs of Anthracnose. We don't do much as long as the trees produce a few fruits each season. So far, the trees have come through for us pretty well... despite intermittent fungicide application.

Gambit

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1213 on: January 24, 2019, 05:52:24 PM »
"But i dont see any thing about Powdery mildew on my tree . What is going on now is flowers withering with no sing of Powdery mildew at all . Is this another kind of Powdery mildew?"


Looks like cold damage, especially on the highest blooms. My tree showed the same damage after a short freeze last January in St. Pete.


exactly that was what happened to my tree it looks just like the pic u attached  thanks alot Gambit .
But did u lose all the blooms ? Did try to do something to save your tree ?

We waited for a couple of weeks and then pruned off the dead branches. The tree bounced back nicely and is currently flowering. We had a Venus mango (smaller tree) that froze to the roots at the same time. Your tree looks like it will recover. I would not prune just yet. Wait at least a couple of weeks to see the resultant damage before you prune. In the meantime, water the tree and give it some micros.

FMfruitforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1214 on: January 24, 2019, 06:27:44 PM »
Valencia P. has had problems putting on new growth and the new growth it has put on looks deformed. Im curious as to what the cause is






Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1215 on: January 24, 2019, 09:15:42 PM »
Is the soil by the tree often water-logged / mucky?

Is the tree un-stable / tippy?

The root-stock looks non-standard:  thick and knarly.

Some of the leaves look deficient in Magnesium, Zinc, Manganese, and Copper.
Har

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1216 on: January 25, 2019, 05:37:58 AM »
It could also be phosphorous fixation which can happen in clay soils, soils with low organic matter.  Can be fixed with carbon additions. Calcium carbonate which is everywhere in Florida is a cause so is adding calcium. Shows as zinc, mg deficiency. OM will fix ph and the phosphorous fixation.

Garoh

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1217 on: January 25, 2019, 06:57:33 AM »
"But i dont see any thing about Powdery mildew on my tree . What is going on now is flowers withering with no sing of Powdery mildew at all . Is this another kind of Powdery mildew?"


Looks like cold damage, especially on the highest blooms. My tree showed the same damage after a short freeze last January in St. Pete.


exactly that was what happened to my tree it looks just like the pic u attached  thanks alot Gambit .
But did u lose all the blooms ? Did try to do something to save your tree ?

We waited for a couple of weeks and then pruned off the dead branches. The tree bounced back nicely and is currently flowering. We had a Venus mango (smaller tree) that froze to the roots at the same time. Your tree looks like it will recover. I would not prune just yet. Wait at least a couple of weeks to see the resultant damage before you prune. In the meantime, water the tree and give it some micros.




Thank you very much Gambit for the comprehensive and useful answer .
I already started to water the tree everyday and dave it micros and humic acid . It looks better now i hope it recover .
« Last Edit: January 25, 2019, 11:56:54 AM by Garoh »

Capt Ram

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1218 on: January 29, 2019, 09:39:03 AM »
Is this powdery mildew on my carry tree?
I just sprayed it with sulfur, but left them in place until I get a positive I'd
Thanks in advance for your response!







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Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1219 on: January 29, 2019, 11:21:19 AM »
Doesn't look like it. Carrie is not generally prone to powdery mildew. Don't be surprised if you don't get a lot of fruit set on those flowers though. That's just how carrie does it. It sets few fruits per pannicle but rarely aborts any.

Carrie can get anthracnose, but I don't really see it in your pics.

Is this powdery mildew on my carry tree?
I just sprayed it with sulfur, but left them in place until I get a positive I'd
Thanks in advance for your response!







Jeff  :-)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1220 on: January 29, 2019, 01:59:01 PM »
Ram, they look healthy.

In such a mass of flowers, most of them have to die.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1221 on: January 29, 2019, 03:06:14 PM »
Ok thanks Har
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hawkfish007

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1222 on: January 29, 2019, 06:15:02 PM »
Ram, they look healthy.

In such a mass of flowers, most of them have to die.

Do mango flowers need pollinators? I have been reading conflicting stories online. My Carrie flowers look exactly like above pictures, but I haven't seen a single ant or bee visiting. Carrie is planted uphill next to a Jujube far from other mango trees. Ants been visiting other mangoes but not Carrie.

Capt Ram

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1223 on: January 29, 2019, 07:42:43 PM »
Fly's seem to be the pollinator as far as I can tell
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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1224 on: January 30, 2019, 08:21:29 AM »
Mostly flies, of all sizes.  Bees also pollinate mangos, when nothing more interesting is nearby.
Har

 

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