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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 315677 times)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #150 on: September 25, 2012, 08:40:17 AM »
It looks like Powdery Mildew damage, possibly combined with Thrips damage.  Have you looked at the underside of the leaves with a magnifier?

Also, if the rootstock has no leaves and no seed left to feed it, the roots may be starving.
Har

anaxel

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #151 on: September 25, 2012, 09:21:36 AM »
thank you for the answer, ;)
photos were taken yesterday, today, there are over leaf on mango tree, they are all brown and dry.
the rootstock has no leaf, it is naked, but green, the problem is at the top of the mango tree.
I looked at the underside of the leaf with a magnifying glass, there was nothing.
 :'( :-[

( I should let it grow a few leaves of rootstock, to promote the growth of the graft and root or not? )

murahilin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #152 on: September 25, 2012, 11:29:05 AM »
thank you for the answer, ;)
photos were taken yesterday, today, there are over leaf on mango tree, they are all brown and dry.
the rootstock has no leaf, it is naked, but green, the problem is at the top of the mango tree.
I looked at the underside of the leaf with a magnifying glass, there was nothing.
 :'( :-[

( I should let it grow a few leaves of rootstock, to promote the growth of the graft and root or not? )

You probably should not have cut off the top of the roostock until the growth from the graft had hardened.

anaxel

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #153 on: September 25, 2012, 12:39:35 PM »
hi murahilin, ;)
to the top of the rootstock, I did not cut., he broke with the wind and I arranged with my chisel.
my luck is there still had an eye on the graft.
since it rot in the graft. :-[
« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 12:47:14 PM by anaxel »

anaxel

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #154 on: September 26, 2012, 10:32:42 AM »
I was recommended to remove the soil and the roots dry, replace the present earth by peat.
after cutting the leaves 3/4 and put a transparent bag on top of the mango tree + light for new growth, appears.
What do you think? :-[

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #155 on: September 26, 2012, 10:45:56 AM »
I was recommended to remove the soil and the roots dry, replace the present earth by peat.
after cutting the leaves 3/4 and put a transparent bag on top of the mango tree + light for new growth, appears.
What do you think? :-[
Not sure why you would have been advised to bare root it...I highly doubt that bare rooting it will help any (and actually may take even more away from a struggling/dying scion.  Cutting what leaves back by 3/4?

Also, unless you were to actually cut the rootstock back (which of course would mean cutting BELOW the graft), I doubt your rootstock will push any leaves at this point.  So with the graft struggling/dying and the rootstock possibly doing the same, you may be fighting an ultimate losing battle.
- Rob

anaxel

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #156 on: September 26, 2012, 11:13:46 AM »
hi bsbullie,
ok,
thank you very much for your help everyone.
bye bye my langra mango tree  :'( :'( :'( :'(.

samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #157 on: September 27, 2012, 06:26:43 PM »
Hi everybody! I have a little problem with my mango tree. It has some dark spots on the leaves, but this really located nothing serious. No leaves fell also. I just don't know what it is and I would like your help to remove those.

Here's some pictures:




samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #158 on: September 28, 2012, 07:13:44 AM »
Nobody?

Mr. Clean

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #159 on: September 28, 2012, 07:30:34 AM »
Nobody?

You've given it less than a day for people to respond.  I'm not an expert, but I would guess anthracnose and would spray with copper sulfate solution.
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110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #160 on: September 28, 2012, 07:51:33 AM »
I was seeing the post getting down on list, so I thought nobody saw it. Thanks for the input! I'll get some copper sulfate.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #161 on: September 28, 2012, 08:15:07 AM »
While spraying copper fungicide won't hurt I am pretty sure that is not anthracnose.
- Rob

samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #162 on: September 28, 2012, 06:22:22 PM »
What do you think it is Rob? I watched some pictures and it doesn't not look like anthracnose, I have no spots on the fruits and flowers look healthy.

CoPlantNut

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #163 on: September 28, 2012, 06:50:40 PM »
What do you think it is Rob? I watched some pictures and it doesn't not look like anthracnose, I have no spots on the fruits and flowers look healthy.

I'm not a mango expert at all, but I bet those spots are caused by the dramatic change in conditions from when the leaf had initially hardened-- specifically in your case, I'm guessing it is the reduced humidity, new artificial lighting conditions, and possibly warmer temperatures (at least more consistently warm, day and night) the plant is now getting in your indoor plant room.  I've seen it on mango seedlings I've grown before when I move them outside (I have high humidity inside, low outside), but I see it all the time on other plants like plumeria, carambola, acerola and others.  I don't think it is anything to worry about; the leaf may not look perfect but it is still working to give the plant energy.  I really doubt it is anything fungal in your indoor setup, unless you're keeping the humidity high using ultrasonic humidifiers- and my experience has been that mold will grow on your walls before it does on the plants in that situation.

   Kevin

samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #164 on: September 28, 2012, 09:49:43 PM »
Thanks Kevin, it release pressure on me :). I have only saw it on my Carrie, not pickering...

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #165 on: September 29, 2012, 08:13:28 AM »
As the spots mostly are not bordered by veins, I don't think it is bacterial leaf spot.  I'm not sure what.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #166 on: September 29, 2012, 09:08:07 AM »
So, I shouldn't worry? Only if the spots begin to affect all the leaves?

samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #167 on: September 30, 2012, 10:37:13 AM »
It started to get worse! That leaf I showed you is now completely affected...Other leaves start to be inffected also. What should I do?
Please Help!

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #168 on: September 30, 2012, 10:44:10 AM »
I am not sure what it is at this point either.  What are you feeding it and how often?  If the leaves have gotten worse, please post new pictures as that MIGHT help.

Are the plants now indoors?  If they are indoors now, did this first appear while outdoors or not till you moved them indoors?
- Rob

samuelforest

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #169 on: September 30, 2012, 01:52:17 PM »
The tree is indoor and I fertilized it with half the strenght of miracle grow each week.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #170 on: September 30, 2012, 01:54:34 PM »
The tree is indoor and I fertilized it with half the strenght of miracle grow each week.
What kind of miracle grow (liquid/granular), how did yo apply it?  Each week, for how many weeks in a row?
- Rob

CoPlantNut

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #171 on: September 30, 2012, 02:44:55 PM »
The tree is indoor and I fertilized it with half the strenght of miracle grow each week.

How close are the leaves to your 1000W light?  Any idea what the humidity is in your plant room?

One suggestion I would have is to get a cheap, lightweight strip thermometer (they sell them at pet shops for use on the outside of fish tanks, usually $5 or less) that you can lay on one of the leaves to see how hot it is getting under your light.  The leaves may be getting hotter than the ambient temperature in your plant room, and while your pictures aren't typical of leaf burn from way too much heat, it could be that they are getting a little too warm.  A cheap strip thermometer will tell you if this is happening, and if it is, you can either move the plants further from the light or get a small oscillating fan to help move air around and cool the leaves off.

   Kevin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #172 on: September 30, 2012, 07:26:04 PM »
Quote
What kind of miracle grow (liquid/granular), how did yo apply it?  Each week, for how many weeks in a row?

I use the all purpose fertilizer. I used it maybye for 4 weeks now, but it doesn't look like fertilizer burn. My Pickering gets the same water with the same concentration of fertilizer and don't have the symptoms of the Carrie.

Quote
How close are the leaves to your 1000W light?  Any idea what the humidity is in your plant room?

The light 26 inches away from the plants and the humidity ranges between 40-50%.

Quote
One suggestion I would have is to get a cheap, lightweight strip thermometer (they sell them at pet shops for use on the outside of fish tanks, usually $5 or less) that you can lay on one of the leaves to see how hot it is getting under your light.  The leaves may be getting hotter than the ambient temperature in your plant room, and while your pictures aren't typical of leaf burn from way too much heat, it could be that they are getting a little too warm.  A cheap strip thermometer will tell you if this is happening, and if it is, you can either move the plants further from the light or get a small oscillating fan to help move air around and cool the leaves off.

What is the perfect temperature close to the leaves? I have already 2 fans. Should I get a exhaust fan to cool the room down?

CoPlantNut

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #173 on: October 01, 2012, 12:43:48 PM »
Quote
What kind of miracle grow (liquid/granular), how did yo apply it?  Each week, for how many weeks in a row?

I use the all purpose fertilizer. I used it maybye for 4 weeks now, but it doesn't look like fertilizer burn. My Pickering gets the same water with the same concentration of fertilizer and don't have the symptoms of the Carrie.

Quote
How close are the leaves to your 1000W light?  Any idea what the humidity is in your plant room?

The light 26 inches away from the plants and the humidity ranges between 40-50%.

Quote
One suggestion I would have is to get a cheap, lightweight strip thermometer (they sell them at pet shops for use on the outside of fish tanks, usually $5 or less) that you can lay on one of the leaves to see how hot it is getting under your light.  The leaves may be getting hotter than the ambient temperature in your plant room, and while your pictures aren't typical of leaf burn from way too much heat, it could be that they are getting a little too warm.  A cheap strip thermometer will tell you if this is happening, and if it is, you can either move the plants further from the light or get a small oscillating fan to help move air around and cool the leaves off.

What is the perfect temperature close to the leaves? I have already 2 fans. Should I get a exhaust fan to cool the room down?

26 inches from a non-moving, un-shielded 1000W light might be a little close, but the pictures you've posted don't really look like heat stress, and every setup is different...  Having the fans running in your plant room is good, and 40-50% humidity is pretty decent too-- both should help to keep the leaves from getting too hot.  If the Pickering is a similar distance from the light and isn't showing these issues, I would think it is not heat stress...  But in the absence of any other suggestions you might try moving the affected plant another 20-30cm away from the light and see if the problem stops.

I don't know what a maximum temperature for the leaves is; in my plant room the air temperature is 86F / 30C but thermometers mounted at the highest leaf level read 95F / 35C and I don't have issues with burning (unless I just sprayed the plants down with oil); I would guess 100F / 38C or above might start to be a problem if it is kept that warm all day long.  I wouldn't worry about an exhaust fan unless air temperatures get above 90F / 32C on a regular basis.

   Kevin

CoPlantNut

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #174 on: October 01, 2012, 12:52:18 PM »
One more thing I should add: if it is only the top-most leaves closest to the light that are showing these issues, then it could be heat / light stress and the stuff I said earlier might apply.  If it is only showing up on lower leaves then it probably isn't heat stress.  From the pictures it isn't clear which leaves are affected.

 

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