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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 335186 times)

skhan

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1850 on: December 20, 2020, 09:21:22 AM »
These are two separate VPs in my father's front yard.
Both seem to have the same issue and don't really fruit that well.





This VP is on the same side where all the mature mango trees have struggled this year. We think the neighbors lawn people put some herbicide down.



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cbss_daviefl

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1851 on: December 20, 2020, 10:52:36 AM »
I have no idea what herbicide damage looks like. Assuming it is not herbicide damage, I see a symmetrical yellowing of the leaf edges. That is typically magnesium. The necrosis could be potassium or fungus. Some extra 0-0-22 k-mag or 0-3-16 would be my plan. If your dad sprays fungicides on flowering mangos, that should help if it is a fungus issue.

These are two separate VPs in my father's front yard.
Both seem to have the same issue and don't really fruit that well.





This VP is on the same side where all the mature mango trees have struggled this year. We think the neighbors lawn people put some herbicide down.



Brandon

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1852 on: December 20, 2020, 03:34:07 PM »
I agree with cbss,

I see old Powdery Mildew damage from last Spring, plus some Magnesium deficiency.

Alternatively, there could be a salt issue.  Is this near the seashore?  Or was a pool drained nearby?  Or was a lot of rich compost or manure placed nearby?
Har

skhan

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1853 on: December 21, 2020, 09:12:55 AM »
Thanks guys,

The plants don't get as much fertilizer as they should and there have been fruit trees all over the yard for over 20 years so I'm sure the soil is depleted.
I'll start adding some potassium and magnesiun.

We are out near the glades and he fill in his pool about 4 years ago.
 
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weiss613

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1854 on: December 23, 2020, 10:39:04 AM »
Why donít you ask your neighbor if he has used any weed and feed on his grass or weed and grass killer. But even if he says yes it canít be the problem because he applied it to his earth and the only way it could affect those trees is if he over-sprayed or his property drains itís surface water by those trees. You canít say itís from lack of water because we had many months of heavy rain in S Fl. Itís important that you look at the new leaves that emerge. If they look like crap or that they will worsen their black/brown spots itís got to be chemical damage or anthracnose. Too much fertilizer can cause burns too.
No matter what caused it take some cultural action after this mango season or as soon as you might have to realize you wonít get fruit this year. Cut the tree down to 16í and cut out all the branches on the inside so air can circulate and so that the ratio of the amount of roots to tree size gives the tree way more nutrition and way more sunlight and wind and heat to dry the rain and moisture that may be causing your tree to possibly have multiple funguses. I do this to my VP at the end of every season. You having nothing to lose since you havenít been getting fruit.

Jagmanjoe

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1855 on: December 23, 2020, 01:39:01 PM »
I know it has been brought up before but it is easy to forget.  If you are using a well with a water softener it can cause issues.  I have a well but if I forget to shut the softener side and tank off beforehand, my hose will tend to drain the tank first which is softened water.

EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1856 on: December 23, 2020, 05:08:28 PM »
I have a fertilizer/nutritional question.
Is it ok to fertilize while buds are just starting to show?
Suppose i should've asked before i did today, leaves looked like they were still a little hungry.
Just a couple lbs on 20yr old 1' or more diameter trunk, pruned maybe 10' high & 20' wide.
Possibly Kent, used this & watered it heavily.  I can't help wanting to fert when chance of rain coming.  Thanks.



Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1857 on: December 24, 2020, 05:52:11 PM »
That is an excellent fruit-tree fertilizer (except that it is low in Manganese for mangos), but it is not appropriate from mid December through late February.
Har

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1858 on: December 24, 2020, 05:56:36 PM »
Looking for some assistance please.  I was admiring my Venus trees today and happy that it's about to send out blooms.  But on one of the branches, I saw a lot of dark spots on the limbs.  Is this normal or something to be concerned over?








EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1859 on: December 25, 2020, 10:47:35 AM »
Har, thank you, felt good hearing my fert's good stuff!  I won't use again till March.
Ordering manganese powder now.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1860 on: December 25, 2020, 11:45:32 AM »
FLMickey,

I can't see very clearly.  Scrape a couple of those spots off and look underneath for live stuff and eggs.  It may be a waxy scale insect.

If that is what it is, brush off what you can with a toothbrush or similar, and soapy water.  Then spray with horticultural spray-oil or with neem oil, which work great in cool weather, but not when a freeze is predicted.
Har

skhan

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1861 on: December 25, 2020, 03:08:42 PM »
These are two separate VPs in my father's front yard.
Both seem to have the same issue and don't really fruit that well.





This VP is on the same side where all the mature mango trees have struggled this year. We think the neighbors lawn people put some herbicide down.




Took some more pictures of the what was going on the north side of my dad's property.
I'll definitely get a soil test soon.

Malika (over 10yrs)
It flushed out in summer and the new leaves died back




Juliette (7yrs)
Same problem as Malika, right next door.
My dad cut the branches back after the leaves fell off







Cotton Candy (2yrs)
Wavy new leaves, bunching branches, tiny internode spacing






Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2019

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1862 on: December 25, 2020, 07:35:47 PM »
skhan,

Two possibilities, neither of them easy to deal with:

Mango malformation, caused by internal infections of Fusarium Fungus, especially the second photo of your Father's pruned-back tree.  Infected branches should be removed--- cut several inches below the lowest visible infection, and the whole tree should be sprayed with Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate and a penetrant adjuvant.  A separate spray with several nutrients plus Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin-C) can also help.

Microscopic bud-mites.  Prune off infestations.  Follow up with a suffocating oil spray, or with a penetrating miticide.
Har

FlMikey

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1863 on: December 27, 2020, 09:40:05 PM »
FLMickey,

I can't see very clearly.  Scrape a couple of those spots off and look underneath for live stuff and eggs.  It may be a waxy scale insect.

If that is what it is, brush off what you can with a toothbrush or similar, and soapy water.  Then spray with horticultural spray-oil or with neem oil, which work great in cool weather, but not when a freeze is predicted.

I scraped some of them off but didn't see an insect.  But I'll do as you say and brush off and use the neem oil.  Thank you so much Har for the help!  I really appreciate it!!

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1864 on: December 28, 2020, 02:28:36 PM »
If it is sap oozing through the bark, spray Copper.
Har

skhan

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1865 on: December 28, 2020, 07:45:22 PM »
skhan,

Two possibilities, neither of them easy to deal with:

Mango malformation, caused by internal infections of Fusarium Fungus, especially the second photo of your Father's pruned-back tree.  Infected branches should be removed--- cut several inches below the lowest visible infection, and the whole tree should be sprayed with Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate and a penetrant adjuvant.  A separate spray with several nutrients plus Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin-C) can also help.

Microscopic bud-mites.  Prune off infestations.  Follow up with a suffocating oil spray, or with a penetrating miticide.

Thanks Har,

The Juliette has only produced a handful of fruits so far so this gives me an accuse to top work it

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EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1866 on: December 29, 2020, 04:33:27 PM »
So, all 5 mangos i bought last month have/had black patches & spots on leaves, stems ect so i hit them with copper/neem mix 2x.
Neem because leaves were getting chewed on.  Foliar fed, fertilized & watered to the limit before hand.
Was cool this month when spraying neem/copper.

Used ag copper 1oz, dynagrow neem 1oz & touch of dawn to dissolve neem 1st.  Per gallon.
Buds forming on every plant.

Does this look like copper overdose?  Leaves weren't perfect when i got them, Pickering was/is best.

Fruit cocktail, Maha Chanok, cogshall, raw honey, pickering.















« Last Edit: December 29, 2020, 09:54:15 PM by EddieF »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1867 on: December 29, 2020, 11:09:50 PM »
Southern Ag's Liquid Copper (Is that what you used?) labeled rate for mangos is 4 teaspoons per gallon--- you used 6!  Registered pesticide labels are incorporated in pesticide law.  If you use registered pesticides, you must read and follow the label.

The Dawn probably increased the toxicity.  Dish detergents are often played with in home plant remedies, and sometimes actually work, such as when used in tiny amoiunts with cooking oil (which sometimes kills both the bugs and the leaves);  however, one doesn't normally recommend dish detergents mixed with registered pesticides, such as Liquid Copper.

For dissolving food-grade un-refined Neem Oil, such as Dyna-Gro Leaf Polish, you can use hot water with soy lecithin, and/or you can use hot water with Potassium Silicate fertilizer, of any brand, including Dyna-Gro Pro-TeKt.  Or you can use Dr. Bronner's Liquid Bath Soap (which is true Castille Soap made of Potassium Salts of Fatty Acids, not a detergent), which actually has on-line labelling for use on plants and is exempt from registration.  Any of these variations should probably be used as a separate spray--- I do not know if they would be compatible with Liquid Copper.

When you devise a new mix of your own, divide gallon rates by four to mix just one quart;  put it in a spray bottle and spray individual twigs or small branches with leaves and watch for several days to see if damage occurs.  Mark branches and note weather conditions and time of day.  If no damage occurs, then you have a candidate mix to use on larger areas, to then see if it actually does some good.



Har

EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1868 on: December 30, 2020, 05:23:12 PM »
Har, thank you.  No more dish soap & i'll force myself to do as you said & test different areas/mixes.
Yes southern ag copper i used (and many times over the yrs) but this time i over did it.
Also i'm thinking never mix copper & neem again.  Neem did its job coating leaves very well, so good i can't blast the copper/neem off. 
These mangos were the 1st i ever bought.  Another lesson learned is look real good for black spots & black stems/shoots before you buy.  Was slim pickings, both places told me due to covid, trees got bought up over the stay home thing.  Plus 2020 72" rain probably didn't help nursery anthracnose none.
I have chamomile tea, might try that on (just a few) leaves & soon to be buds on 20yr old tree tomorrow.

Spider mites looks to be next to tackle, noticed white sacks all over avocado i topped today next to old mango.  Squashed one with finger & looked like sack bled.  What's weapon of choice for that?

Thanks again.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1869 on: December 30, 2020, 08:37:00 PM »
For mites in cool weather, spray Sulfur, or spray oil, two weeks apart--- don't mix.
Har

EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1870 on: December 30, 2020, 10:10:38 PM »
Edit- erased my late night babble.

Har, thanks again. 
I used 6 not 4 spoons mistakenly, confused it with another product.  I promise to read/follow labels here on out.
Learned mixing Neem with other products could be good but also bad news.  Can't rinse off if mistake.
Neem i'll think of as a sealer or wax.
I'll take new photos today, i have a hunch the leaves were in poor health before spray.
Pickering was in good health, got same spray & still looks great.

Got the sulfur powder, read label, will go play spider man shortly.
Thanks again.




« Last Edit: December 31, 2020, 09:15:41 AM by EddieF »

EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1871 on: December 31, 2020, 10:24:07 PM »
Windy day so instead of sulfur, i blasted mango trees, leaves, tiny buds with garden hose 3x.  Tried rubbing stems & some blackish buds with paint brush even!  Gave it my all.
Hopefully i'll do so good, they'll be lots of flowers or pea size mangos to remove.
1 ordered that soap.  Looks like great bath & shower soap for us humans.











Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1872 on: December 31, 2020, 11:53:51 PM »
Those blackish smudges on the twigs' bark are not anthracnose, and is generally considered harmless.
Har

bovine421

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1873 on: January 01, 2021, 12:02:08 AM »
And what is this all about my Pickering has this going on all over it. My other trees just have a clear little bit of sticky business going on

By the by it sounds like happy New Year
Tete Nene Julie Little Gem Pickering Dot Sonpari Mallika PPK E-4 OS Phoenix Fruit Punch SweetTart Honey Kiss M-4 Neelam Lychee Guava  Atemoya Sugar Apple Soursop Citrus Plantain Barbados Cherry

bovine421

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #1874 on: January 01, 2021, 11:26:16 AM »
The Battle of sooty mold

Battle of Sooty mold was fought by my allies without any help from me.

I never knew there were so many varieties of wasp could not get photos of all of the varieties





After noticing so many wasp and varieties of wasp I decided to reevaluate I went and watch truly Tropicals video on sooty mold and decided the Nature Boy to just let nature run its course.
After a two-month hard-fought battle it looks like the scales a turn brown and have exit holes in them.
The only thing that I noticed missing from the battle was the usual ladybugs that visit me

Early in the battle I tried to clean to sooty mold but it was very tedious was still a little sticky
So I kind of gave up but now I noticed that as time is going on and it's dried out that the sooty mold is almost peeling off by itself and you can very easily take your fingernail and rub it off.



I do have neem oil and insecticide soap coming but I really don't think I will use them because it's attracting so many pollinators and this is  flowering season.


What do I do now coach >:( :(
Do not want scale infestation to magnify and multiply and spread to other trees



« Last Edit: January 01, 2021, 01:06:25 PM by bovine421 »
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