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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 309341 times)

zands

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #200 on: October 14, 2012, 09:50:39 PM »
As f the sooty mold...get rid of the best and the sooty mold will stop.  I have posted this link before I believe but in any event, here you go...  http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf

The free floating black mold that is always in the air feeds on the insect excreted honey dew (explained at your link) and grows explosively. Looks awful

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #201 on: October 14, 2012, 10:09:58 PM »
As f the sooty mold...get rid of the best and the sooty mold will stop.  I have posted this link before I believe but in any event, here you go...  http://baker.ifas.ufl.edu/Horticulture/documents/BlackSootyMoldonLandscapePlants.pdf

The free floating black mold that is always in the air feeds on the insect excreted honey dew (explained at your link) and grows explosively. Looks awful

Not really sure what you are truly saying but unless you have insect infested plants that could be causing sooty mold on your roof, your roof is just plain dirty.

From the IFAS link I posted, "Sooty mold grows on a substance called “honeydew” which is excreted from certain insects such as aphids, soft scales, whiteflies and mealybugs. These insects feed on a variety of landscape plants and
can be found on the leaves and stems where they use special mouthparts to pierce plant tissues and suck
out the juices from within. During this time these insects excrete large amounts of a sticky, sugary
substance commonly called “honeydew”. The excreted honeydew coats leaves, stems, and fruit,
stimulating the growth of sooty mold."

I do not think most people have insects causing honeydew on their roofs.  The most common causes of dirty roofs are dirt, tar, acid, jet fuel, and algae.
- Rob

zands

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #202 on: October 14, 2012, 10:18:01 PM »
@bsbulie

  • there is plenty of black mold in the air here
  • it will latch onto and feed on whatever it can
  • it can be the "honey dew" on plants
  • it can be on roof tiles and shingles
  • black mold can sink roots into roof concrete tiles....somehow this is food for it
  • black mold can also infest asphalt roof shingles....blast those with a pressure cleaner and you are really asking for trouble ..... you will wear them down considerably

good luck

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #203 on: October 14, 2012, 10:35:53 PM »
@bsbulie

  • there is plenty of black mold in the air here
  • it will latch onto and feed on whatever it can
  • it can be the "honey dew" on plants
  • it can be on roof tiles and shingles
  • black mold can sink roots into roof concrete tiles....somehow this is food for it
  • black mold can also infest asphalt roof shingles....blast those with a pressure cleaner and you are really asking for trouble ..... you will wear them down considerably

good luck
Not all black mold is sooty mold...there is more than one type of mold.  Yes, sooty mold can be found on non-plant surfaces but it is due to an infected plant above or in the specific area (as in an overhead tree affected by an insect causing honeydew).

As I stated, I have 320 roofs to keep clean...they are never hit with any type of pressure washer.
- Rob

zands

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #204 on: October 14, 2012, 11:06:28 PM »

Not all black mold is sooty mold...there is more than one type of mold.  Yes, sooty mold can be found on non-plant surfaces but it is due to an infected plant above or in the specific area (as in an overhead tree affected by an insect causing honeydew).

As I stated, I have 320 roofs to keep clean...they are never hit with any type of pressure washer.


Here is what you need the H2O2 equivalent for removing black and green from roofs>>  http://compare.ebay.com/like/200618412450?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&_lwgsi=y&cbt=y but I think you already have the situation under control.

MarinFla

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #205 on: October 15, 2012, 04:09:09 PM »
It IS DEFINITELY Spiralling White Fly and it is VERY BAD. The Coconut Palms are tall and dripping honeydew on everything. The infestation is spreading to my fruit trees. I need to do something drastic!!

I am thinking soil drench of imidacloprid (commercial strength) and then spray all the trees with malathion. Thoughts?

Someone told me I have to 'inject' the coconut palms to treat them....is this true??

Someone posted a link to commercial imidacloprid ....Murahilin? PJ ? I need it and I should have saved it :(




murahilin

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #206 on: October 15, 2012, 04:50:17 PM »
It IS DEFINITELY Spiralling White Fly and it is VERY BAD. The Coconut Palms are tall and dripping honeydew on everything. The infestation is spreading to my fruit trees. I need to do something drastic!!

I am thinking soil drench of imidacloprid (commercial strength) and then spray all the trees with malathion. Thoughts?

Someone told me I have to 'inject' the coconut palms to treat them....is this true??

Someone posted a link to commercial imidacloprid ....Murahilin? PJ ? I need it and I should have saved it :(

I am having the same problem with my coconut trees and other trees. I don't think imidacloprid is the way to go though. A strong stream of water will remove the spiraling white fly from your trees. If you add some soap to that strong stream of water it will kill the white flys while also removing them. Then after a few weeks of weekly spraying, when the population has been reduced, you could purchase some beneficial bugs that parasitize spiraling white fly eggs and then your problem could possibly be controlled. Using chemicals like imidacloprid is generally not good for the environment and you should consider trying out alternative safer treatments before you go the systemic pesticide route.


bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #207 on: October 15, 2012, 05:11:52 PM »
As much as i do not like the chemical nuking, this is one of the times it is warranted.  I have gone through an infestation on 320 properties and there was no option but chemicals.  There is a reason why these buggers are infesting plants everywhere and not reducing by number.  If a nice soap spray with beneficial bugs were an easy and reliable fix, these guys would no be considered an epidemic.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2012, 06:24:13 AM by bsbullie »
- Rob

Californiatropicals

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #208 on: October 15, 2012, 10:37:25 PM »
Hey everyone, Thought I'd post some pics and try and get some feedback on my mango trees.



These two are my manila mangoes.. they've been outside the past 3 years even in winter with zero protection..  the stems have grown thick and they had a lot of good growth!

This year most of the growth seems to be from the roots.. and not on the top  of the growth.. Does anyone know why  it's doing this?  I've pruned back all the lower growth a few times this year.. but it seems to keep coming back.. anyone know why? 


On the bright side.. I recently got a beautiful valencia pride mango from florida just about a month ago.. it's grown more in a month than my manila mangoes grow in a year! I have great expectations of VP here!

This is when i got it a month ago

this is it today..  ;D






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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #209 on: October 16, 2012, 07:36:25 AM »
Your mango trees that are growing mostly from the roots are doing what almost all grafted mangoes want to do.....that is the rootstock wants to grow from itself rather than supporting the foreign grafted tree above.  If you want to maintain the variety that you purchased the tree for, you best trim off the new growth from the roots.  Otherwise, before long the root sprouts will overtake the tree and the roots will stop sending nutrients to the grafted portion of the tree.  The new tree grown from the roots will be a seedling and its own individual mango with its own characteristics.  Those characterics will likey be substantially inferior to the grafted portion that you purchased the tree for.

Edited for spelling errors...at least the one I spot so far.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2012, 09:52:04 AM by HMHausman »
Harry
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MarinFla

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #210 on: October 16, 2012, 08:08:07 AM »
It IS DEFINITELY Spiralling White Fly and it is VERY BAD. The Coconut Palms are tall and dripping honeydew on everything. The infestation is spreading to my fruit trees. I need to do something drastic!!

I am thinking soil drench of imidacloprid (commercial strength) and then spray all the trees with malathion. Thoughts?

Someone told me I have to 'inject' the coconut palms to treat them....is this true??

Someone posted a link to commercial imidacloprid ....Murahilin? PJ ? I need it and I should have saved it :(

I am having the same problem with my coconut trees and other trees. I don't think imidacloprid is the way to go though. A strong stream of water will remove the spiraling white fly from your trees. If you add some soap to that strong stream of water it will kill the white flies while also removing them. Then after a few weeks of weekly spraying, when the population has been reduced, you could purchase some beneficial bugs that parasitie spiraling white fly eggs and then your problem could possibly be controlled. Using chemicals like imidacloprid is generally not good for the environment and you should consider trying out alternative safer treatments before you go the systemic pesticide route.

The problem I have  is that the coconut palms are 35-45 ft tall so the hose spray isn't strong enough trying to reach that high. All  the hedges that are on my neighbors property are also now infested and it is too much to eradicate with natural predators. I am worried at how fast the sooty mold completely covered my mango trees and the flies have moved onto my  other healthy fruit trees to cause trouble.
I need to treat this aggressively.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #211 on: October 16, 2012, 09:50:16 AM »
Not sure what happened to my post from yesterday but, here goes again in a simplified form.

I would use Safari or its generic over Imidacloprid for the spiraling whitefly.  Both Safari and commercial/professional strength  Imidacloprid are available at Howard Fertilizer on Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach (just east of 441).
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #212 on: October 16, 2012, 03:19:56 PM »
Not sure what happened to my post from yesterday but, here goes again in a simplified form.

I would use Safari or its generic over Imidacloprid for the spiraling whitefly.  Both Safari and commercial/professional strength  Imidacloprid are available at Howard Fertilizer on Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach (just east of 441).

Thanks Rob. I am on it. I have our pest guy coming to check my house. The association may pay him to do the hedges but those coconut palms are not in the scope of his association duties. He wanted like $50 to inject each one x3 trees=$150.. For that much I can buy the stuff and treat it myself with a soil drench.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #213 on: October 16, 2012, 03:56:57 PM »
The Safari will cost you over $300.  The generic will be a little cheaper.
- Rob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #214 on: October 16, 2012, 07:32:06 PM »
Hi guys :). I might be annoying, but I still have the same problem on my mango tree, but it got worse. I really don't know what to do...Should I prune it back? I would like to keep the fruits!

Here's some pictures:

This one of the leaves that are affected. It should not be sunburn since it is a the bottom. All my other trees are looking great. The mango tree who is affected is also flushing where it was pug.





It looks like it is only affected in the back. I have about 20 leaves or more like that.

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #215 on: October 16, 2012, 07:34:32 PM »
Samuel, what you have looks like some cold damage.  Has there been a large swing in temps or humidity for this mango? 
Harry
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #216 on: October 16, 2012, 07:47:27 PM »
Not really, it have been indoors for about a month. I think the lowest temperature it have been through was 6 degrees celsius. the humidity is also pretty low, les than 50%.

HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #217 on: October 16, 2012, 08:06:10 PM »
6 C is about 42 F and with lowered relative humdity, could cause that kind of damage, especially if the growth was not completely hardened off and had been growing at much higher temps or relative humdity than it is experiencing now. In any case, if it gets no worse, I would not be concerned.
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #218 on: October 16, 2012, 08:11:43 PM »
You think it is caused by too much temperature variation?

HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #219 on: October 16, 2012, 08:14:09 PM »
That's my theory. Has it encountered wide temp or humidity swings?  It wold only take one timed correctly to cuase some leaf discoloration.  Could be something else, but I am at a loss to say what else it may be.
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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #220 on: October 16, 2012, 08:18:06 PM »
It could have. It might be the variation from outdoors to indoors?

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #221 on: October 16, 2012, 11:39:33 PM »
Your mango trees that are growing mostly from the roots are doing what almost all grafted mangoes want to do.....that is the rootstock wants to grow from itself rather than supporting the foreign grafted tree above.  If you want to maintain the variety that you purchased the tree for, you best trim off the new growth from the roots.  Otherwise, before long the root sprouts will overtake the tree and the roots will stop sending nutrients to the grafted portion of the tree.  The new tree grown from the roots will be a seedling and its own individual mango with its own characteristics.  Those characterics will likey be substantially inferior to the grafted portion that you purchased the tree for.

Edited for spelling errors...at least the one I spot so far.

Thanks for your response! My concern though is this is not a grafted mango, it is a seedling Manila Mango which are polyembronic..  I wish I could figure out why it's growing from the roots.

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #222 on: October 17, 2012, 10:11:35 PM »
Samuel,

The leaf underside mis-coloring and drip-tip burning could be from spray damage.   Even soap spray can do this, at too high a concentration or staying wet with spray for too many hours.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #223 on: October 17, 2012, 10:20:53 PM »
CaliforniaTropicals,
Did you plant a whole polyembrionic seed there?  Or did you separate out the other plants.  It could be that you have several plants in each pot, which need to be pulled out as weeds.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #224 on: October 17, 2012, 10:47:01 PM »
Samuel,

The leaf underside mis-coloring and drip-tip burning could be from spray damage.   Even soap spray can do this, at too high a concentration or staying wet with spray for too many hours.
That was my initial thought...posted a page or two back...
- Rob

 

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