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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304276 times)

Tropicdude

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #350 on: March 27, 2013, 02:22:13 AM »
Euphoria sepulcralis
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/IN/IN75000.pdf

DM


I see he is a bad guy for sure.   almost looks like the nasty fellow that was nibbling on my mangosteen roots, except he had smooth shell, not this Klingon forehead looking beetle.
William
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rusahlynn

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #351 on: March 28, 2013, 05:07:11 PM »
I need help with my mango, but can't seem to get my pictures to post :( I used the "add image to post" button, and upload my picture, but it won't copy anything to here. I am on a different forum that uses the exact same system of posting pictures and it works just fine there...what am I missing?!

My issue with my little mango plant (approximately 8" tall) is that the leaves are curling and brown, and it's tiny trunk has split in one spot. Also, some leaves came off and there's a "scab" (for lack of a better word) where they were, does this prevent new growth? (It happened on the sides and the top, there were three tiny (1/2") leaves coming out the top, and they got knocked off :( ) it was planted last June, and grew well until about 4 months ago, and hasn't grown at all since. (Besides those three leaves that got knocked off a couple weeks ago). I do live in Canada, and we have very cold winters, but it's been in a pot in my (cool) house the whole time. Any idea on why it could be going brown? (And I realize its hard to tell without photos)

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #352 on: March 28, 2013, 09:59:14 PM »
Extremely low air humidity could be stressing the leaves.

There could be a nutritional deficiency, such as not enough Potassium.

There could be microscopic bud-mites.  Or thrips.

There could be powdery mildew if the air in the house is ever of high humidity and cool.
Har

rusahlynn

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #353 on: March 29, 2013, 12:22:44 AM »
Extremely low air humidity could be stressing the leaves.

There could be a nutritional deficiency, such as not enough Potassium.

There could be microscopic bud-mites.  Or thrips.

There could be powdery mildew if the air in the house is ever of high humidity and cool.

How could I tell which it is? And I looked, and there is tiny specks of white stuff on the backs of the leaves, would that be bugs? If so, how would I get rid of them?
And I have no idea if its humid or not in my house....generally the area I live in is quite dry...but my house might be more humid...but I don't think so.

rusahlynn

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #354 on: April 01, 2013, 04:05:37 PM »
Last year my sister planted a mango seed from a store bought mango (so I have no idea what variety it is!), and once it started growing, she gave it to me. That was last July. It grew well for the next couple months (it was in a small pot on my windowsill), but then seemed to stop growing and the leaves started going brown :( I thought maybe it just needed a bigger pot, so I moved it to a little bit larger of a pot, but it didn't seem to help :( I am wondering if it was just the cold and lack of much sunlight that stopped its growth? I had a couple leaves fall off, and the stalk appears to have had a split down it, as there's a hard brown like running down it. Now, I'm seeing what appears to be new growth in places, which is very exciting as it means its still alive! But I'm wondering what to do about the brown leaves? And is it ok to keep it indoors? Or should I move it outside at some point?

I realize it'll be hard to "diagnose" the problem without seeing pictures, but I can't seem to get the post an image link to work :(
If it helps, the brown appears to have started on the edges of the leaves and has worked it's way toward the middles. I looked under the leaves and there a tons of tiny white specks, but I don't have a magnifying glass so I can't tell if its bugs or dust  :-\

Oh and I live in Canada, and it gets very hot in the summer (100+ degrees F) and very cold in the winter (well below freezing).




« Last Edit: April 09, 2013, 03:04:43 PM by rusahlynn »

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #355 on: April 01, 2013, 04:09:43 PM »
low humidity is a big problem...turns leaves brown.

good luck with your mango!  Youre courageous!


HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #356 on: April 01, 2013, 06:22:50 PM »
I realize it'll be hard to "diagnose" the problem without seeing pictures

Hard?  I would say near impossible.
Harry
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rusahlynn

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #357 on: April 09, 2013, 03:05:24 PM »
I realize it'll be hard to "diagnose" the problem without seeing pictures

Hard?  I would say near impossible.

Pictures added :)

HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #358 on: April 09, 2013, 03:10:27 PM »
I really can't say what caused the browning of your leaves.  What I can say is that if new leaves are forming, ansd those leaves have no issue with the browning, then you needn't worry about it.  Mango leaves can drop for various reasons and can get burned by chemicals, salt, sun, cold, low humidity and probably a host of other things. So, I would watch the new leaves, keep humidity and light up, stay away from chemical applications and see what happens.  Good luck.
Harry
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adiel

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #359 on: April 09, 2013, 03:12:40 PM »
Have you added anything to the soil?
Adiel

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #360 on: April 09, 2013, 03:18:37 PM »
My pickering had leaves that looked exactly like that. it also lived in a pot. couple weeks after the brown spots appeared the leaves smelled rotten, they started to drop, and the limb was actually dead. very surprising because it was doing great! the whole tree dried and rotted, dropped all leaves, and is now just a small stick in a pot :(

rusahlynn

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #361 on: April 09, 2013, 03:29:00 PM »
My pickering had leaves that looked exactly like that. it also lived in a pot. couple weeks after the brown spots appeared the leaves smelled rotten, they started to drop, and the limb was actually dead. very surprising because it was doing great! the whole tree dried and rotted, dropped all leaves, and is now just a small stick in a pot :(

That happened to my sisters avocado too :( she figured out it was some kind of big (I can't remember what it's called....black something or other!), and she found a spray that killed it. Also apparently the bug doesn't like sand so she covered the top of the soil in sand. As did I, thinking it might be the same thing....but it doesn't seem to be....

And no, I haven't added anything to the soil.
I will keep an eye on the new leaves and see if they turn brown as well...

demingcr

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #362 on: April 09, 2013, 03:39:38 PM »
what soil is it potted in, it looks like ash?

There seems to be a dish underneath the pot which can cause water to pool at the feet of the plant and eventually cause root rot. This would be more prevalent in a thicker potting mix where the water can't drain all that well.
- Colin

rusahlynn

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #363 on: April 09, 2013, 04:36:02 PM »
what soil is it potted in, it looks like ash?

There seems to be a dish underneath the pot which can cause water to pool at the feet of the plant and eventually cause root rot. This would be more prevalent in a thicker potting mix where the water can't drain all that well.

It's potted in a tropical plant soil mix...I had no idea what to use, so I just used that....I also mixed in some of that white stuff that's supposed to make it drain well since I had heard that mangos like well drained soil.
What you're seeing is the sand I put on top of the soil to prevent getting the same little bugs that my sister had that killed her avocado....I have no idea if that's ok or not  :-\
I put some pebbles in the bottom of the pot over the hole so that the water wouldn't pool, the dish is just there to keep water off my table, there is rarely water sitting in the dish...but I'll be sure to keep an eye on it and dump it immediately if theres any water in it! Thanks!!

MangoFang

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #364 on: April 09, 2013, 05:26:35 PM »
The white stuff I believe is called perlite....


And I beg to differ but Low Humidity is NOT a problem with mangoes....I live in a desert - if that was true I would have every single leaf of every mango looking like that one......

It could be many things - how often are they watered, do they sit in water after watering (guess that issue's been mentioned already), too much fertilizer, the water has a high salt content and if any potted plant is not flushed occasionally, (and certainly some plants more than others), they will exhibit salt burning, etc.

Rusa - do you know the kind of water you've got?  That would be my first suspect.  Can you get like some kind of water filter thing (like a Brita?) to take out some of the bad stuff you might be watering it with....?

Try flushing it real good - meaning - let a slow stream of water (probably doing this in the sink or outside with a hose) trickle into the pot and let the water drain freely out the bottom - I don't know - maybe 15 minutes?  But a real slow trickle...that should grab some of the salts sitting in the soil and take them away....

Maybe worth a try.  You're new growth budding out from the top looks healthy enough........



Fang

HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #365 on: April 09, 2013, 05:54:37 PM »
Low humidity, I meant to say, is not the issue, but dehydration which can come from low humidity and an inadequate amount of water to the roots.  Even with insufficient water to the roots, higher humidity will sustain the leaves for some time longer than if there was no humidity.  Mangoes love humidity and do their most vigorous growing with humidity.  That's what I meant to say.
Harry
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Tropicdude

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #366 on: April 09, 2013, 06:31:08 PM »
Did you use some kind of fertilizer?  does the water have a lot of chlorine, or other minerals.

try looking at the roots, just turn it over , pull it out, at look at the bottom,  use your nose, also, does it smell nasty?  do you have a lot of roots or almost non at all? 

you may have water storing at the bottom,   

salts and chemicals could cause some leaf burn like that,  my big book on nutritional problems , has leaves that look similar to this on trees with potassium deficiency.

I noticed in the picture you have already lost a couple of leaves at the top, and the tip looks like its also starting to burn.   not looking good for your little tree, but mangoes are tough little buggers.
William
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Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #367 on: April 09, 2013, 07:08:17 PM »
agree with william. possible chlorine / fert / salt burn.
Jeff  :-)

Pancrazio

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #368 on: April 09, 2013, 07:12:09 PM »
Check the stem where it buries in the soil. Usually watered plants, indoor, stay wet for too long (you know, no wind whatsoever) and this can lead to stem rot under the soil level. After that leaves have problems because the stem doesn't bring there enough water/nutrients. If the entire cambium dies, the plant can live for some time (like a cut flower) but it is practically dead.
Give the plant some fresh air and some more sun as soon as possible. But pay attention when you first expose it to sun, because it may get scorched.
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MangoFang

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #369 on: April 09, 2013, 07:12:33 PM »
...totally agree with you Harry....


Thirsty Fang

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #370 on: April 09, 2013, 07:24:36 PM »
i remember when i went to canada that indoor plants dried up very quickly...2 waterings a day was not enough,it was incredibly dry and cold...but if it's humid and cold...that's also bad for tropicals.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #371 on: April 10, 2013, 04:43:18 AM »
Although bad drainage, excess salts, potassium deficiency, and burying of the root crown are all viable interpretations of the problem, the burn patterns on the leaves and vertical white-covered brown stripe on the stem and white fluff under the leaves appear to indicate Powdery Mildew.
Har

Mike T

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #372 on: April 10, 2013, 05:07:03 AM »
One problem can have compound effects.Sodium and chlorine are bad news and burnt edges are often a sign of salt problems and this may also influence K availability.K deficiency causes burnt tips.Exces fertilizer application can also burn leaves like that.
The quality of water used and history of fertlizer applied may hold the answer to the problem.

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #373 on: April 10, 2013, 11:02:40 AM »
Ohh wow, that would make sense since indoor temps and humidity would be conducive to PM growth. Good eye.

Although bad drainage, excess salts, potassium deficiency, and burying of the root crown are all viable interpretations of the problem, the burn patterns on the leaves and vertical white-covered brown stripe on the stem and white fluff under the leaves appear to indicate Powdery Mildew.
Jeff  :-)

rusahlynn

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #374 on: April 17, 2013, 12:03:11 AM »
Wow, thanks for all the great replies!
We are on well water, so I'm not sure what's all in it, all I know is its very hard, it leaves white deposits everywhere. For example, our kettle will have a solid white layer on the bottom within a day or two after totally cleaning it!
I have never used any sort of fertilizer or anything like that on it, all I do is water it!
I will maybe try "flushing it out" (or whatever it's called!) and see if that helps!
I now have three new leaves (yay!), each about an inch long, and I am keeping a close eye on them for any brownness!

 

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