Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 303843 times)

Tropicdude

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2096
    • Dominican Republic, Zone 13B.
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #375 on: April 17, 2013, 02:24:38 AM »
Sounds like lime deposits, have you ever checked the Ph of your water? if not try getting one of those Ph kits.  and/or even testing the soil. 
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

amadioranch

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 43
    • Phoenix Arizona
    • View Profile
    • Amadio Ranch
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #376 on: April 17, 2013, 11:03:00 AM »
low humidity is a big problem...turns leaves brown.

good luck with your mango!  Youre courageous!

I hear this repeated often....how does that jive with the fact that we grow mangoes with relative success here in Phoenix? Most of the year our humidity levels are below 10%.
 

mario

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 109
    • phoenix az Zone9
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #377 on: April 25, 2013, 10:59:11 PM »
Anyone knows what might be the cause? The flowers started putting little fruuts but they dried up and turned black

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15601
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #378 on: April 26, 2013, 12:01:45 AM »
Anyone knows what might be the cause? The flowers started putting little fruuts but they dried up and turned black

I guess anthracnose--fungal disease. Spraying with copper usually used to prevent that.
Oscar

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7488
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #379 on: April 26, 2013, 06:52:12 AM »
Sure sounds like anthracnose to me as well.Too much rain or water during flowering and poor nutrition can make it worse.Copper oxychloride and sometimes with a dash of mancozeb is used here.The fungicide treatment can burn the flower and small fruit off as effectively as the disease.

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8714
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #380 on: April 26, 2013, 07:19:14 AM »
depending on if there were truly "little fruits", hard to tell without pictures, it could also just be the life cycle of the pannicles without setting any fruit.  Here in SFla, with the extremely late blooms we have had or are getting, a lot of the pannnicles are just frying up/dying with no fruit set whatsoever.
- Rob

Charlie23

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 70
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #381 on: April 26, 2013, 05:11:47 PM »
this happened to my potted carrie too.... of all the pannicles or bloom, only 1 set fruit, and i doubt it'll make it to a full size mango anyway. 

Pancrazio

  • Off Tropic
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 910
  • Florence, Italy, USDA 8
    • Growing fruits in Florence, and Pratovecchio, Italy
    • View Profile
    • FruttAma.it
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #382 on: April 28, 2013, 08:58:44 AM »
Once more, after the cold winter, my mango starts to bloom. I have removed the first bloom early because panicles growt during winter usually are poor, with deformed ovary, and mostly male. So i removed the panicles when they were very young, too soon before noticing anything strange. I was hoping in an healthy second bloom with more favorable temperatures.
Last year (spring 2012) i got one diseased panicles, apparently one from MMD. I'm not sure because our long cold humid winter surely can give a lot of problem to a plant, so, of course, it may have been just a metabolic disease.  The plant seemed to recover during summer and the growth was normal till now. Now, in the second bloom of 2013, i seem to have spotted some blooms that aren't growing as expected: i'm wondering if someone of our experts can tell me if they are definitively from MMD, because on that cause, i would remove them and prune the twig. They seem to stay on the short side for now, but of course they are still vey small. Maybe i'm still in time for getting another bloom, but temperature are about to rise, and if i'm not quick i'll lose the chance to get some fruit in 2013, and it would be upsetting.

Here some picture of what i'm talking about. Do they seem normal to you?







In the last picture you can see the panicles low in the twig that have formed a bit earlier, but the seem me more healthy and well formed. Any idea/suggestion? Thank you from an hopeless grower.

Italian fruit forum

I want to buy/trade central asia apricots. Contact me in PM if interested.

davidgarcia899

  • Marabu Groves - Redland, Florida
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1536
  • Marabu Groves
    • USA, Miami-Dade, 33187, 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #383 on: April 30, 2013, 05:52:07 PM »
This goes out to all the forum members in Florida who have an Angie planted.

When it comes to mangos my property hates them. Serious I have planted dozens of varieties only to see them die from disease. Only my NDM have grown without any disease problems, although the fruits always crack  >:(. I have a Mallika that is doing okay and same for a San Felipe.

So what are your experiences growing Angie? Is it disease resistant?
- David Antonio Garcia

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #384 on: April 30, 2013, 06:07:59 PM »
It is very disease resistant....at my house anyway.  But then again, most mango trees do well at my house.  If a mango tree is dying at your house, I would be looking into some sort of soil contaminant, like a petroleum product or such, mangoes don't just die.  Its takes some doing to kill them as long as you provide water.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

mangokothiyan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 644
    • Coral Springs, Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #385 on: April 30, 2013, 09:40:12 PM »

Have been trying to get an Angie, but the tree is hard to find.

Apart from Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, is there any place where one can buy a 3 gallon Angie? What are the chances of getting one at the mango festival? 

Squam256

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2122
  • Mangos and budwood for sale
    • USA, West Palm Beach, FL, 33405, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • https://www.facebook.com/TropicalAcresFarms
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #386 on: April 30, 2013, 09:45:05 PM »

Have been trying to get an Angie, but the tree is hard to find.

Apart from Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, is there any place where one can buy a 3 gallon Angie? What are the chances of getting one at the mango festival?

They are good if I don't buy them all the day before and you can beat sleepdoc in a 400 meter sprint.

davidgarcia899

  • Marabu Groves - Redland, Florida
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1536
  • Marabu Groves
    • USA, Miami-Dade, 33187, 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #387 on: April 30, 2013, 10:16:33 PM »
It is very disease resistant....at my house anyway.  But then again, most mango trees do well at my house.  If a mango tree is dying at your house, I would be looking into some sort of soil contaminant, like a petroleum product or such, mangoes don't just die.  Its takes some doing to kill them as long as you provide water.

They don't die immediately, they get diseased and slowly die,
- David Antonio Garcia

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #388 on: April 30, 2013, 10:19:31 PM »
Diseased how?
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2626
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #389 on: May 01, 2013, 12:32:22 AM »
normal blooms
Har

davidgarcia899

  • Marabu Groves - Redland, Florida
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1536
  • Marabu Groves
    • USA, Miami-Dade, 33187, 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #390 on: May 01, 2013, 12:38:09 AM »
I am pretty sure it some sort of fungus. It looks like anthracnose the only difference is that the leaves eventually begin to turn brown and brittle staring around the edges and then the stem begins to die until it burns all the way down
- David Antonio Garcia

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8714
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #391 on: May 01, 2013, 07:02:57 AM »
Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?
- Rob

johnb51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3023
    • USA Coconut Creek, FL Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #392 on: May 01, 2013, 09:14:34 AM »
I am pretty sure it some sort of fungus. It looks like anthracnose the only difference is that the leaves eventually begin to turn brown and brittle staring around the edges and then the stem begins to die until it burns all the way down

I wonder if the Fairchild, UF, or USDA people down your way could help you determine what the problem is.
John

davidgarcia899

  • Marabu Groves - Redland, Florida
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1536
  • Marabu Groves
    • USA, Miami-Dade, 33187, 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #393 on: May 01, 2013, 09:45:17 AM »
Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?

sorry rob what do you mean?
- David Antonio Garcia

Tim

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1548
    • USA, Escondido, CA 92027, zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #394 on: May 01, 2013, 11:11:37 AM »
I believe BSbullie was addressing Pancrazio's post prior to my merging of the two topics.

Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?

sorry rob what do you mean?
Tim

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8714
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #395 on: May 01, 2013, 01:29:24 PM »
I believe BSbullie was addressing Pancrazio's post prior to my merging of the two topics.

Are you sure you had malformation on any part of the plant in the past?

sorry rob what do you mean?
Tim is correct.
- Rob

Pancrazio

  • Off Tropic
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 910
  • Florence, Italy, USDA 8
    • Growing fruits in Florence, and Pratovecchio, Italy
    • View Profile
    • FruttAma.it
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #396 on: May 01, 2013, 06:28:42 PM »
normal blooms

Thank you very much Har. Too bad, i was really paranoid about this mango malformation disease, and pruned the two terminal twig away yesterday. :(
Now i'm a bit on the sad side.
Italian fruit forum

I want to buy/trade central asia apricots. Contact me in PM if interested.

Doglips

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 980
    • Houston TX 9A
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #397 on: May 06, 2013, 07:18:03 AM »
After seeing how the Mango Whisperers are able to diagnose nutritional problems I started looking around the net.  There are many sites that help you do this, but this seems to be one of the better ones, the flow charts are great, and learning about mobile and immobile nutrients was the real a-ha moment for me.

http://landresources.montana.edu/NM/Modules/Module9.pdf

It was designed for grain crops (I don't think they grow many tropicals in Montana). I think that the core symptoms should apply to most any plant.  It doesn't cover pH lockout and many nutrient toxicities but it is still good.  Multiple deficiencies can really muddy the water.

It does seem like the easiest solution is to fertilize with major-minors-micros for most nutrient problems (defiencies at least).
 
I've been Fe and Mn dosing a couple of plant after reading this, I think I am have some success.

mario

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 109
    • phoenix az Zone9
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #398 on: May 06, 2013, 01:31:52 PM »
Has anyone here fertilized with the potash 0-0-51? Have you gotten noticeable results?

edzone9

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2542
    • Zone 10 SW Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #399 on: May 06, 2013, 06:15:19 PM »
Hello members;

I Have a Nice Carrie Mango Tree That is Blooming , I noticed little black dots on some of the green leaves , not on the blooms , Can I Spray the entire with Copper spray including the Blooms , Or Should i spray the entire tree with Neem Oil ?

If i have to spray with either , how often do i have to spray ?
Its my 1st Mango Bllom ;).
Thank You Ed.


Zone 10

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers