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Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 304162 times)

jc

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #425 on: August 14, 2013, 12:03:12 PM »
Har and Harry,

Thanks for the attempt. I'm not really concerned, just curious at this point.
JC

Mucbean

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #426 on: August 27, 2013, 07:45:42 PM »
Does anyone know what is causing this on my mango tree. It looked fine(except for the browning of the leaves at the bottom) a week ago. I'm not sure what type of mango tree it is, it was given to me by a vietnamese friend of mine.
Thanks,
Mike








Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #427 on: August 28, 2013, 09:34:41 PM »
Likely to be powdery mildew or anthracnose, and the condition was probably contributed to by wind damage when the new leaves were at their most tender stage.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #428 on: August 29, 2013, 04:10:09 PM »
There are many different problems people have asked questions about through the course of this thread. 

The first one was regarding what appears to be some kind of egg cases on a mango plant.  I also noted that in the close-up pictures, it looked like some of the egg cases may have already hatched out.  Before applying any kind of spray I think it is important to determine: is it friend or foe?  Since no one seemed to recognize what was in the picture, I suggest the following course of action.  Get a one quart canning jar (a clean Classico spaghetti sauce jar will do nicely).   Pick up some plastic window screen scraps from your local hardware store.  Carefully remove some un-hatched egg cases and deposit them in the canning jar.   Screw on the canning jar screw cap, minus the lid and some place where you won't forget it or the sun won't cook it.  Watch and see what hatches.  If they are a friend of the garden, release them.  If they are a pest, add a little dish soap, fill with water and dump them down the drain. 

As for the fungal diseases, where there is a minor infection use Kop-r spray.  For more severe infection, like the nasty looking black one,  I suggest cutting the tree back to healthy material and discarding the infected part in the trash or burn it.  Make sure the clippers are then disinfected with Clorox so you don't  transfer the problem to other plants.

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #429 on: September 08, 2013, 03:15:26 PM »
Wanted to share some pictures of our little Cogshall and see if anyone has any thoughts.

We bought it in June from Excalibur and brought it back to TN with us.  It's still in the same pot and has been outside in as much sun and heat as we can provide it.  On cooler nights we've been bringing it in. 
I have been watering it only sparingly, and it does drain well.  We pugged it about 2-3 weeks ago.

This first picture is of the tip of the tree where we cut it, and you can see the sort of necrotic section at the top.  I'm assuming this is okay, as it does appear that the leaf nodes directly below it are bulging somewhat with what I hope is future branching.



My second concern is some of the newer leaves, which have some holes and in some cases have just died back by about 50%




Lastly, some of the older leaves have small black spots, but they haven't seemed to spread or get bigger.  Anything to worry about?



Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #430 on: September 08, 2013, 10:58:47 PM »
The third picture shows Mango Bacterial Leaf Spot, probably from too-wet conditions back at the nursery.  Keep the leaves from staying wet for many hours, and the infection is not likely to spread much.  When the leaves get old, or when there is plenty of new growth to sustain the plant, dispose of the contaminated leaves.
Har

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #431 on: September 10, 2013, 12:01:28 PM »
The third picture shows Mango Bacterial Leaf Spot, probably from too-wet conditions back at the nursery.  Keep the leaves from staying wet for many hours, and the infection is not likely to spread much.  When the leaves get old, or when there is plenty of new growth to sustain the plant, dispose of the contaminated leaves.

Thank you so much!

One other question, out of curiosity.  The third picture I posted above also shows some pale speckling on the mature leaves.  I would almost call it iridescent - it sort of shimmers or changes colors as you move the leaf around in the sun. It almost looks like a residue of something, but I've never sprayed anything on the leaves.

Anything to be worried about?

Carbo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #432 on: October 11, 2013, 08:14:13 AM »
My Cogshall has recently shown sooty mold growth on many of its leaves.  It's my understanding sooty mold is a result of white fly infestation, as well as aphids.  But an inspection hasn't revealed the presence of either pest.  What are other possible causes?

phantomcrab

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #433 on: October 11, 2013, 09:17:02 AM »
I have noticed it on my Maha's interior leaves but not on any other trees.
Richard

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #434 on: October 11, 2013, 11:02:04 PM »
Mealy bug and scale also produce honeydew which black sooty mold grows on.

In several cases, I have not found a culprit, but sooty mold can be visible for months after the pests are gone.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #435 on: October 11, 2013, 11:06:23 PM »
Mineral deposits from water can sometimes be iridescent when still very thin.
Har

Carbo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #436 on: October 12, 2013, 05:06:42 PM »
Mealy bug and scale also produce honeydew which black sooty mold grows on.

In several cases, I have not found a culprit, but sooty mold can be visible for months after the pests are gone.
What do you recommend for treating either or both of these pests?  I have a bottle of Southern Ag Parafine Horticultural Oil.  But my concern is the label says not to use after October 1 in Florida.  I'm surprised.  Can someone tell me why?  Thank you.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2013, 05:31:10 PM by Carbo »

mangaba

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #437 on: October 12, 2013, 09:26:11 PM »
 I have a mango tree in my garden where most of the mangos show this change in pulp.  Is this a  nutritional problem ? What corrective measure would be advisable?



                       
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                                                                          mangaba
               

bangkok

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #438 on: October 15, 2013, 08:52:59 AM »
moved
« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 06:47:20 PM by bangkok »

HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #439 on: October 15, 2013, 12:34:12 PM »
I have a mango tree in my garden where most of the mangos show this change in pulp.  Is this a  nutritional problem ? What corrective measure would be advisable?



                       
              Thank you in antecipation
                                                                          mangaba
             


What kind of mango is is this?  Has it fruited before with a different looking interior?
Harry
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Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #440 on: October 15, 2013, 08:03:46 PM »
Mangaba,

What kind of soil is your tree growing in?  What kind of fertilizer have applied?
A good mix containing lots of Potassium, Magnesium, Zinc, and Boron, usually along with several other elements, should probably be applied to the ground, under the tips of the branches.  Lime or Gypsum, for Calcium, should also be applied.
Har

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #441 on: October 15, 2013, 08:07:43 PM »
Carbo,

Oil sprays, applied two weeks or so before cold weather, increases many plants susceptibility to cold damage.  But that 1 Oct cut-off date sounds appropriate to Zone 9b!
Har

Carbo

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #442 on: October 15, 2013, 08:51:41 PM »
Carbo,

Oil sprays, applied two weeks or so before cold weather, increases many plants susceptibility to cold damage.  But that 1 Oct cut-off date sounds appropriate to Zone 9b!
Thanks, Har.  If that is Southern Ag's reasoning, then it really has no bearing for those of us here in southeast FL.  I should be good to go this weekend.

nch

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #443 on: October 22, 2013, 12:27:27 AM »
I am sorry if my question has been asked and answered before, but I am overwhelmed with all the reading about mango diseases and sprays, I need a short cut. I just bought a Mallika mango, and some of the leaves have brown edges with some greasy stuff on them on the underside. It's too dark to go take pictures right now, but if needed, I'll take some tomorrow. Not knowing any better, I did cut off the worst ones and threw them away yesterday. I didn't realize they could be a sign of something really bad.

HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #444 on: October 22, 2013, 08:18:13 AM »
Mangoes don't necessarily require spaying to grow and be productive.  Cutting off the diseased leaves was not a bad thing....except for diagnosing the problem.  Keep the tree well watered and give it a very light balanced fertilizer (time release is good). Make sure the fertilizer has minor elements.  And I repeat.......light on the fertilizer.  If the problem comes back take pictures and re-post.
Harry
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nch

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #445 on: October 22, 2013, 12:04:23 PM »
Thank you Harry for answering. It's good to know that mangoes don't require spraying to grow. Here are some pictures I just took. The fungus under the leaf is new to me. The new leaves are not affected, at least to my newbie eyes.[imghttp://][/img]

Cookie Monster

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #446 on: October 22, 2013, 07:53:50 PM »
The one burnt leaf looks similar to fertilizer burn, but the other leaves look healthy and you're growing in a completely different climate than me. It also looks like there may be some premature leaf drop on the trunk, which could also be a sign of either fert burn or lack of water. Mangoes can be very sensitive to over fertilization.
Jeff  :-)

nch

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #447 on: October 22, 2013, 08:44:40 PM »
Thank you, Cookie Monster. As for the fungus under the leaves, is it something to worry about?

HMHausman

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #448 on: October 22, 2013, 09:23:52 PM »
Is it fungus underneath or scale insect.  From the picture it is hard to tell.
Harry
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nch

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #449 on: October 22, 2013, 09:28:57 PM »
Harry, it is fungus. It was very visible in the morning when the leaves were covered with dew, but at noon time, when the leaves were dry, I could barely see it.

 

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