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Author Topic: Greening? Old fading leaves? Nutrient Deficiency? All of the above?  (Read 1483 times)

demingcr

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Afraid this is "all of the above" and that this persian lime has greening.

West Coast of FL, from a cutting, in ground roughly 2 years. Have had it on imidicloprid treatment off and on to give it half a chance between aphids thrips psillids and leafminers but not diligently enough for it to be psillid free.

Worried about the seemingly color inversion on the fruit pictures and mottling of the leaves. Sometimes "old" citrus leaves look mottled especially if nutrient deficient which has prompted this post instead of an immediate axe and disposal. Thanks for the expert opinions ahead of time.

I have a naval orange and a Honey Murcott and various potted sour citrus that don't seem to have this same issue/coloration.









- Colin

brian

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Looks like just old leaves to me, but I'm no expert.  My trees started looking like that prior to a huge growth flush.

Millet

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I don't see any fruit to look at.  At this time I also don't see any greening.  The tree does look a little deficient in nitrogen.  The symptoms of nitrogen deficiency are, Yellow-orange veins with some green in between, and out on the far side.   Nitrogen deficiency shows up on older leaves, while newer leaves still has some green.  Note that new growth flushes  always look more yellow until the leaf matures. - Millet

demingcr

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Hi Millet, thanks for looking.

The very last picture has a small fruit on it that is very pale green. I have two slightly larger fruit (not pictured) that are dark green and appear normal. I will apply more nitrogen, thanks.
- Colin

Millet

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demingcr, yes now I see the fruit on the last picture.  Looks very normal. - Millet

demingcr

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Thanks for the answers, going to treat deficiencies and see what we end up looking like. Appreciate it!
- Colin

citrange

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It might also help to first clear the grass from under the tree up to the drip line.
Otherwise the grass gets the available nitrogen before the lime!

Millet

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Grass or weeds growing under a citrus tree causes more difficulties for citrus than most other types of trees.  Citrus has a very shallow root system with many feeder roots near the soil surface.  Weeds, and grass should not be allowed to grow under citrus trees. .  Grass is especially a big competitor when water and fertilizer are applied to the tree.  Much of the moisture and nutrition is absorbed by the grass instead of the tree.  That is why many citrus trees growing in the lawn show nutrient deficiencies, even when fertilizers have been applied.  As Citrange pointed out in the above post, it is always considered best to keep the soil under a citrus tree bear of growth. - Millet
« Last Edit: May 16, 2014, 09:08:41 PM by Millet »

 

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