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Author Topic: Grapefruit in S. Florida - Easy or Difficult?  (Read 1077 times)

BrettBorders

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Grapefruit in S. Florida - Easy or Difficult?
« on: May 20, 2014, 11:12:29 AM »
I love grapefruit.

I have one prime planting spot in my yard.

As a kid growing up in South Florida I remember seeing orange and grapefruit trees everywhere. Groves, gardens, yards, etc. Now I don't notice too many trees out and about.

I read about HLB / greening ruining Florida citrus.

In light of HLB, its it viable or wise for a beginner to plant a grapefruit tree for long term fruit and shade in a small yard? 


I do not want a high-maintenance tree, a tree that requires heavy chemicals to protect,  or a tree that is likely to be killed several years down the road.

bsbullie

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Re: Grapefruit in S. Florida - Easy or Difficult?
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2014, 11:13:02 AM »
While I agree that home grown fruit tromps store bought fruit any day, growing citrus in South Florida can require more attention.  Yes, there is the "threat" of greening (which I havent seen a lot of in this area, there is also canker, leaf miner, mites, soil condition issues (ground holding water, composition of soil, etc.) and other problems that can affect citrus here.

I don't want to say you cant grow quality citrus here, I do want to alert/advise that it can be fruit that requires extensive care/hihj maintenance at times to be successful.

If you want a citrus (grapefruit, lemon, lime, orange, tangerine, etc.), than plant a citrus of your choice.  If you want a fruit tree that provides shade, there are many other options that may suit your shade needs that will be a more reliable producer with less care.
- Rob

mrtexas

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Re: Grapefruit in S. Florida - Easy or Difficult?
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2014, 10:26:08 PM »
I love grapefruit.

I have one prime planting spot in my yard.

As a kid growing up in South Florida I remember seeing orange and grapefruit trees everywhere. Groves, gardens, yards, etc. Now I don't notice too many trees out and about.

I read about HLB / greening ruining Florida citrus.

In light of HLB, its it viable or wise for a beginner to plant a grapefruit tree for long term fruit and shade in a small yard? 


I do not want a high-maintenance tree, a tree that requires heavy chemicals to protect,  or a tree that is likely to be killed several years down the road.

With grapefruit so cheap in south Florida why bother growing it?

Millet

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Re: Grapefruit in S. Florida - Easy or Difficult?
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2014, 10:42:22 PM »
South Texas (Rio Grand Valley) and Florida, are the two best locations for growing grapefruit in America.  First choose whether you prefer a red flesh or a white flesh grapefruit.  Then make a call to your local county adviser for the variety that will grow best in your location. One last comment: Grapefruit will hang on a tree for a long time.  The longer you let grapefruits stay on the tree the sweeter the fruit becomes. Most people say not to pick a grapefruit until February or March. - Good luck. - Millet

gnappi

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Re: Grapefruit in S. Florida - Easy or Difficult?
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2014, 03:41:27 PM »
I love grapefruit.

I have one prime planting spot in my yard.

As a kid growing up in South Florida I remember seeing orange and grapefruit trees everywhere. Groves, gardens, yards, etc. Now I don't notice too many trees out and about.

I read about HLB / greening ruining Florida citrus.

I do not want a high-maintenance tree, a tree that requires heavy chemicals to protect,  or a tree that is likely to be killed several years down the road.

I too love grapefruit, but when mine died from reaching salt ground water I decided to not buy another.

You're right about citrus disappearing as a yard fruit, with the issues involved there are many other tropical fruits that have less problems.
 
I find carambola an excellent sweet / tart substitute. They make attractive trees, can provide shade without citrus thorns, have no disease issues and grow with little care. If you haven't tried home grown carambola do so, if you have tried store bought fruit don't judge them by the horrid store fruit in Florida.








Regards,

   Gary

 

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