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Author Topic: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?  (Read 5584 times)

Millet

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Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« on: May 23, 2014, 09:49:04 PM »
Would you like to grow a citrus tree in your yard, but you don't live in California or Florida?  Would you like to have the only citrus tree in your area? A citrus tree growing outside the warm citrus built would be a tree never before seen by your neighbors.  With the many cold hardy citrus varieties available, you can do this. There  are 30 to 40 citrus varieties citrus that can be grown out of the citrus built with either no protection, or with protection of a couple weeks a year. 

TRIFOLIATE ORANGE ( Poncirus trifoliata) - The most hardy citrus that can be grown without protection as far north as Washington DC in most areas is Trifoliate Orange (Poncirus trifoliata).  This hardy citrus tree is generally given a hardy temperature rating of -15-F (-26-C).  If the Flying Dragon cultivar is planted you will have a strangely crooked but beautiful looking tree.

ICHANG PAPEDA (generally hardy to 0-F (-18-C): is a slow-growing species of Citrus, which has a characteristic lemon scented foliage and flowers. It is native of China. Its main claim to fame is its unusual hardiness, with the exception of Poncirus trifoliata, it is the hardiest citrus tree, tolerating both moderate frost and damp conditions. For this reason, it is one the only species of true citrus which can be reliably grown outside in the temperate areas of Europe and the United States. The tree produces a small mandarin like fruit that is quite fragrant, ripening to yellow or orange. Most people grow the Ichang papeda as an ornamental. The best known of its hybrids include the Ichang lemon, and the popular yuzu, both of which have a number of culinary uses and are notably cold-hardy.

There are many other cold hardy citrus cultivars, some that have a taste sufficient to be eaten out of hand, and still can be grown in colder areas.  These will be added to this post in the days ahead. - Millet   

Millet

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2014, 09:39:57 PM »
THOMASVILLE CITRANGEQUAT
This tree is a very old cultivar developed by the USDA, and is considered the best citrangequat yet developed.  The fruit is egg-shaped, with egg-sized fruit that makes a good lime substitute in summer, I find it good on fish and salads, and becomes edible out of hand by Christmas. Due to the fruit having a thin sweet albedo ( the white inner peel), it makes an excellent marmalade.  The Thomasville citrangequat is a fast fruiting tree from seed, which normally is 3 to 4 years. I had a Thomasville tree and thought that the fruit was very  eatable if left hanging on the tree until around Christmas. Hardy to around 10 degrees F (-12-C)  This is a very good tree to try for yards out of the citrus built. - Millet

http://hardycitrus.blogspot.com/2013/07/thomasville-citrangequat-was-early.html
« Last Edit: May 30, 2014, 09:42:58 PM by Millet »

kh0110

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2014, 09:45:42 PM »
Where can one get such trees? Please don't tell me to google!!!
Thera

Millet

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2014, 02:01:24 PM »
kho11o, below are two well known citrus nurseries that sell cold hardy citrus trees.  Unfortunately because you live in a citrus producing state (California) no out of state supplier of citrus trees can legally ship anything to you.  You will have to find a supplier within California.. - Millet

http://mckenzie-farms.com/photo.htm
www.Plantfolks.com

kh0110

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2014, 02:11:36 PM »
Thank you, Millet. It's not for me, but for a family member in France.
Thera

Millet

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2014, 09:51:30 PM »
Ten Degree Tangerine also known as Clem-Yuz 3-3 can be a citrus tree for yards outside of the citrus belt.  This very ornamental citrus tree was developed in Texas, and it sure lives up to it name. A friend's tree bloomed and then set fruit after sustaining temperatures as low as 21-F over a cold period of 49 hours.  The sweet/sour tasting tangerine fruit ripens around Christmas in Texas.  Grafted upon a Flying Dragon root stock the tree can reach a height of around 12- feet when fully matured. Stan Mckenzie of Mckenzie Farms offers this tree at $20.00 in a one gallon container (or $20 per gallon). - Millet
« Last Edit: June 02, 2014, 09:53:52 PM by Millet »

Pancrazio

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2014, 08:00:58 PM »
Thank you, Millet. It's not for me, but for a family member in France.


It's forbidden to import citrus budwood in EU from outside the EU (you can just import seeds), but must of the plant Millet mentioned can be found in european nurseries.
Take a look:
http://www.oscartintori.it/elencodellevarieta.php
http://www.exotickerostliny.cz/en/katalog-rostlin-othermenu-95/citrusy-othermenu-90.html
http://www.eisenhut.ch/
http://www.agrumes-baches.com/baches/1292/boutique
The last one is located in France.

Also, Millet, if you can share any info you have on yuzu, I will find it very useful. I'm thinking of yuzu for planting in my garden, because i want a lemon lookalike with bright yellow fruit hanging from it for the winter, but i don't really know if it is feasible. I have heard that yuzu fruit can survive to -5C freezes, but they also drop from the plant as soon as they turn yellow.
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Millet

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2014, 09:19:55 PM »
Yuzu is an ancient cultivar going back thousands of years in China. The British plant hunter Frank Meyer, famous for discovering the Meyer Lemon, which is named for him, also discovered the hardy Yuzu in  Hsi-Chi village in northwestern China in 1914.  Yuzu is a cross between Citrus ichangensis x C. reticulata, thus it is a ichandarin.   The yuzu does not resemble either parent which is quite unusual. The tree is medium sized, narrow upright, and quite cold hardy.  The most notable characteristic of Yuzu is it pungent aroma.   Yuzu fruit are normally harvested in autumn while still green, although the fruit eventually turns a dark yellow color, and when dried is commonly used as a spice.  The peel is edible, and the albedo (the white inner portion of the peel) is distinctly sweet, much like a kumquat.  It is used in Japan like a lemon, and as an aroma ingredient in hot baths.   When fully dormant it can tolerate temperatures as low as 10F and perhaps lower when fully dormant.  Like many Citrus ichangensis hybrids, it can go deciduous during cold spells with no loss to fruiting wood. -Millet

Mark in Texas

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2014, 09:10:36 AM »
Arctic Frost satsuma and Orange Frost sat are two super cold hardy hybrids.  I've got Arctic Frost in this spring and the young tree is doing well.

The results of his breeding work with citrus live on in the form of new, Satsuma x ‘Changsha’ tangerine hybrids with enhanced tolerance of freezing cold. The Moy varieties entering the market are:

    ‘Orange Frost™’ Hardy Satsuma (Plant Patent #23496) – A selection with improved cold hardiness having survived 12 degrees F. at Overton, TX.
    ‘Arctic Frost™’ Hardy Satsuma (Plant Patent Applied For) – The most cold hardy selection having survived 9 degrees F. at Overton, TX.


My very young Owari went thru 18F unprotected with no problems.

http://www.plantanswers.com/Articles/TheHardySatsuma.asp

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2014, 09:03:14 PM »
Very interesting. Too bad because those absurd patents, will be unlikely that i will be able to experience their cold hardiness first hand.
I have a Miyagawa and a Okitsu, i will try to test their hardiness next winter, if i will be able to graft them on FD before the end of the summer. Grafting on FD can be tricky sometimes.
They are on Alemow right now.

@Millet: the yuzu has a sweet albedo? The after it is juiced the peel can be eaten like a kumquat? This would be something.
It seems to be a very hardy plant. I have a anecdote of a plant in Switzerland which, fully acclimated survived to 0F (with complete defoliation of course).
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Millet

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2014, 10:09:34 PM »
Some time back I seen a TV documentary on Dr. Moy and his work with citrus. - Millet

Mark in Texas

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2014, 10:36:13 PM »
Very interesting. Too bad because those absurd patents, will be unlikely that i will be able to experience their cold hardiness first hand.
I have a Miyagawa and a Okitsu, i will try to test their hardiness next winter, if i will be able to graft them on FD before the end of the summer. Grafting on FD can be tricky sometimes.
They are on Alemow right now.

@Millet: the yuzu has a sweet albedo? The after it is juiced the peel can be eaten like a kumquat? This would be something.
It seems to be a very hardy plant. I have a anecdote of a plant in Switzerland which, fully acclimated survived to 0F (with complete defoliation of course).

Flying Dragon is a PITA for me.  Come winter it shuts down regarding nutrient uptake and takes forever to induce the scion to come out of dormancy.  I've got Meyer and Rio Red on it that still haven't pushed foliage and here it is summer.

I'll take sour orange over FD any day.

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2014, 07:09:57 PM »
I can see what you mean, sour orange is also pretty easy to graft. But I'm willing to plant the satsumas near a fence, so they have got to stay small and I was thinking that, since cold hardiness is my biggest limiting factor, FD was just perfect. On the other hand, as i said, is very difficult to cleft-graft on smaller twigs, at least for me.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2014, 09:54:14 PM by Millet »
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Millet

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Re: Want A Citrus Tree In A Cold Yard?
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2014, 10:58:15 PM »
Mark In Texas, thank you so much for bring Orange Frost Hardy Satsuma to our attention.  Orange frost  has is an excellent citrus for people outside of the citrus built.  Orange Frost satsuma has been repeatedly observed to be cold hardy to at least 12F (-11 C), with some leaf defoliation at temperatures below about 15F (-9 C). Above 15F the tree's foliage remains evergreen. The fruit is similar in quality to a high quality Satsuma type tree with few seeds present between 0 to 4 per fruit. The fruit is sweet with a tinge of tartness and has an easy to peel skin.  Although  its female parent Changsha exhibits slightly better cold hardiness, the fruit of Orange Frost is much improved as the fruit of Changsha is less flavorful,  and has abundant seeds. In comparison to the male parent, which is a Satsuma, Orange Frost is more cold hardy. Tree sales of Orange Frost is exclusive to Greenleaf Nursery in El Campo, and will not be available for general release until 2014. Greenleaf Nursery has applied for a plant patent, docket No. 201008 on this variety. - Millet

 

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