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Author Topic: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree  (Read 7849 times)

adiel

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Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« on: April 23, 2012, 11:42:13 AM »
Since Zinc usually is not brought up as a topic.  I thought it would be a good idea to cover it in a thread and learn from each other.

I am interested in knowing the different forms that our tropical fruit forum members are supplying the Zinc needs for Mango trees:

Are you using Foliar sprays containing Zinc, if so which one and how much per year are you applying?

Are you using Fertilizers containing Zinc, if so which one and how much per year are you applying?

Are you using another method to apply Zinc, if so which one and how much per year are you applying?


Zinc can help to avoid Mango Decline according to this article:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg216
Adiel

zands

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2012, 03:13:22 PM »


http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg216


from your source link--
"Mango trees growing in calcareous soils should receive annual nutritional sprays of copper, zinc, manganese, and boron for the first 4 to 5 years. Thereafter, only zinc, manganese, and possibly boron are necessary. Boron (sodium borate formulation) may be applied annually in a foliar spray or in dry form. Boron should only be applied at very low rates (1/300th of the nitrogen rate) because it is toxic to plants at moderate to high rates. Mixes containing copper, zinc, manganese, and boron are available from many garden centers. Iron should be applied in chelated form (FeEDDHA compounds are the best) as a soil drench 2 to 3 times per year."

Has to be foliar like Southern Ag nutritional spray for citrus and other fruits...... Because the high soil ph of calcareous soils inhibits root absorption of the minerals mentioned here. Copper, manganese, zinc, iron. Though chelated iron can be absorbed by roots (via a drench) or used as a foliar.


adiel

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2012, 03:19:40 PM »
Zands, thanks for your input on using Southern Ag Nutrional Spray (containing Zinc).

I would also like to know what others are using:

Are you using Foliar sprays containing Zinc, if so which one and how much per year are you applying?

Are you using Fertilizers containing Zinc, if so which one and how much per year are you applying?

Are you using another method to apply Zinc, if so which one and how much per year are you applying?
Adiel

zands

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2012, 03:25:38 PM »
Zands, thanks for your input on using Southern Ag Nutrional Spray (containing Zinc).

 What is in Southern Ag nutritional spray found at Home Depot and other places http://www.southernag.com/docs/labels_msds/ms0190.pdf

My Kent mango tree looks ragged so I am going to start using Southern Ag nutritional spray on it.

Cookie Monster

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2012, 05:06:13 PM »
Though I'm in Broward, I have a similar situation -- limestone rock just a few inches beneath the soil. Fortunately, the mango tree isn't all that sensitive to alkaline soil, so I've been able to get good success by simply mulching over the entire backyard. It took a couple of years, but somehow the humus helps the tree to absorb micronutrients. My carrie mango, which previously had signs of micro-nutrient deficiency (ie, chlorosis), is now green as grass in the summer without micronutrient application due to the layer of compost in my yard.

However, the same can't be said for my carambola. It requires multiple applications of chelated micronutritional spray multiple times a year, regardless of how much compost it has.

If you don't want to go through the trouble of mulching over your backyard with a thick layer of tree trimmings, then you could just hit it with the southern ag chelated spray that Zands referenced a couple of times per year. Non chelated forms of micronutrients (eg, granular fertilizers) will not work at all if you have alkaline soil.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 05:07:49 PM by Cookie Monster »
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2012, 05:31:27 PM »
Ironite would work well up in your area, as I'm assuming you have deep sand. However, it doesn't work down here in Broward / Dade, since most of our 'soil' is alkaline. The high-ph inhibits root absorbtion of non-chelated micronutrients. I've tried Ironite and several other brands before settling on keyplex 350. Alkaline soil necessitates the use of chelated micronutrients.

I stopped using the foliar nutritional sprays because they are messy and stain. Plus if it rains it washes off.  I now use Ironite Mineral Supplement 1-0-1. This has all the micro-nutrients plus iron and calcium. If you over apply it, no burning or damage. Get it at lowes and hd.

http://ironite.com/
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2012, 11:06:06 PM »
When spraying mangos for any problem, adding in a little Zinc sulfate (such as one cup in 100 gallons) gives added benefits.
Har

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2012, 12:43:24 PM »
Har,  I kind of remember Gary Zill recommending soil application of a small amount of some sort of chelated zinc. He may have been answering the question of someone in Broward with alkaline soil.
Would you remember offhand what exact product this might have been?

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2012, 11:22:43 PM »
I recall using chelated iron (Sequestrene 330, for non-alkaline soil) and various KeyPlex and similar mixes as soil drenches.  I don't recall just chelated Zinc by itself, but maybe I have forgotten.   Frequent light foliar sprays with Zinc sulfate was what worked well.
Har

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2012, 12:42:05 AM »
When spraying mangos for any problem, adding in a little Zinc sulfate (such as one cup in 100 gallons) gives added benefits.

ironic how zinc and copper are plant poisons if used heavily. They are used on roofs to inhibit mold. Strips of the metal (either one) at the roof peak. I even sprayed my roof tile with copper sulfate to kill some black mold buildup which you always get in FL. But it seems both are needed and if you have alkaline (like Broward) soils you have to go foliar to apply and get them absorbed

zands

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2012, 12:47:00 AM »
I recall using chelated iron (Sequestrene 330, for non-alkaline soil) and various KeyPlex and similar mixes as soil drenches.  I don't recall just chelated Zinc by itself, but maybe I have forgotten.   Frequent light foliar sprays with Zinc sulfate was what worked well.
 

Zinc sulfate cheap on ebay for those who want to mess around http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?clk_rvr_id=335862893348&_nkw=Zinc%20sulfate&_sop=15. I have already bought iron and copper sulfates there at nice prices

adiel

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2012, 07:42:39 AM »
Thanks for all who have contributed to this thread.  Zinc, although considered a "micro-nutrient" is still required by most trees.  It looks like for alkaline soils the best way to go is using a foliar spray.  Has anyone used the Southern Ag Zinc Sulfate Granular(or similar product) in addition to foliar spray:


Adiel

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2012, 09:50:48 AM »
Thank you for the cheap source information.

Another source is the Hi-Yield brand.

Old Bridge Chemical in New Jersey sells several grades of Zinc sulfate.

It is important to know which compound you are working with:

Zinc sulfate monohydrate (specific gravity around 3.28) is very concentrated;

Zinc sulfate heptahydrate (SG around 1.97) is much less concentrated, because it has 7 molecules of water bound in it instead of 1.

If a recommendation does not specify which Zinc sulfate molecule is being talked about, to be on the safe side, assume that the recommendation is for the heptahydrate.  If what you have is monohydrate and you don't know how to calculate chemical moles, use only about 1/6 of the recommended amount.

I didn't lay hand on a specific recommendation for mangos just now, the recommendation for heptahydrate on cherimoya leaves is 1 gram per liter of water.
Har

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2012, 04:22:47 PM »
More important than the raw numbers is the form in which the micronutrients are given. Water soluble iron (for example) has nil effect when inserted into an alkaline soil situation -- it all binds with calcium before the tree can even utilize it.

Alkaline conditions here in South Florida arise due to one of two situations:
  • Well water which comes from limestone aquifers and is rich in calcium
  • Soil that sits directly on top of oolitic limestone (and is also laden with calcium)
Even chelated iron comes in a couple of different forms depending on the ph of your soil. So, make sure you get the right product for your soil, lest your money be spent in vain :-).

My personal favorite for alkaline soil is keyplex 350 mixed with a smidgen of peters 20-20-20.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2012, 04:27:38 PM by Cookie Monster »
Jeff  :-)

natsgarden123

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #14 on: April 25, 2012, 07:00:42 PM »
Though I'm in Broward, I have a similar situation -- limestone rock just a few inches beneath the soil. Fortunately, the mango tree isn't all that sensitive to alkaline soil, so I've been able to get good success by simply mulching over the entire backyard. It took a couple of years, but somehow the humus helps the tree to absorb micronutrients. My carrie mango, which previously had signs of micro-nutrient deficiency (ie, chlorosis), is now green as grass in the summer without micronutrient application due to the layer of compost in my yard.

However, the same can't be said for my carambola. It requires multiple applications of chelated micronutritional spray multiple times a year, regardless of how much compost it has.

If you don't want to go through the trouble of mulching over your backyard with a thick layer of tree trimmings, then you could just hit it with the southern ag chelated spray that Zands referenced a couple of times per year. Non chelated forms of micronutrients (eg, granular fertilizers) will not work at all if you have alkaline soil.

Jeff
Do you think mulching heavily around the tree, to the drip line, would accomplish the same thing? :)

Cookie Monster

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2012, 07:36:50 PM »
There are a couple of things to keep in mind: Once the tree matures, the roots will extend quite a ways beyond the drip line (Gilman says 3 times the width of the canopy). Also, if you're using cypress, you could be waiting quite a while (years) for it to fully decompose and start to contribute to the soil.

In my case, I used tree trimmings which break down quite a bit more rapidly, and it still took about 2 years before I noticed a difference. As Har pointed out on a different post -- during the beginning stages of the decomposition process, the mulch consumes nitrogen. After it's in a more progressed stage of decomposition, it starts to contribute to the nitrogen content.

So, recommendation is to use tree trimmings (free from local tree trimmer), mulch very deep and wide, and be patient because it takes a while :-). You'll be happy in the end though.

Though I'm in Broward, I have a similar situation -- limestone rock just a few inches beneath the soil. Fortunately, the mango tree isn't all that sensitive to alkaline soil, so I've been able to get good success by simply mulching over the entire backyard. It took a couple of years, but somehow the humus helps the tree to absorb micronutrients. My carrie mango, which previously had signs of micro-nutrient deficiency (ie, chlorosis), is now green as grass in the summer without micronutrient application due to the layer of compost in my yard.

However, the same can't be said for my carambola. It requires multiple applications of chelated micronutritional spray multiple times a year, regardless of how much compost it has.

If you don't want to go through the trouble of mulching over your backyard with a thick layer of tree trimmings, then you could just hit it with the southern ag chelated spray that Zands referenced a couple of times per year. Non chelated forms of micronutrients (eg, granular fertilizers) will not work at all if you have alkaline soil.

Jeff
Do you think mulching heavily around the tree, to the drip line, would accomplish the same thing? :)
Jeff  :-)

zands

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #16 on: April 25, 2012, 07:45:23 PM »

Do you think mulching heavily around the tree, to the drip line, would accomplish the same thing? :)

I mulch heavily but not out to the drip line because I like to see a lot of green grass. I mulch with trimmings/chipped trees bushes not the Home Depot stuff ........ BUT..... you are in Palm Beach County and you may not have an alkaline soil problem. How deep does your sand layer go? I hit rocks (coral) after 8 inches but I bet your sand is three feet deep at least


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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #17 on: April 25, 2012, 07:55:30 PM »

Do you think mulching heavily around the tree, to the drip line, would accomplish the same thing? :)

I mulch heavily but not out to the drip line because I like to see a lot of green grass. I mulch with trimmings/chipped trees bushes not the Home Depot stuff ........ BUT..... you are in Palm Beach County and you may not have an alkaline soil problem. How deep does your sand layer go? I hit rocks (coral) after 8 inches but I bet your sand is three feet deep at least

Its sand for at least a few feet down, maybe more

zands

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2012, 08:20:04 PM »


Its sand for at least a few feet down, maybe more

So I doubt you have an alkaline situation like Jeff or me we both have houses in the 33321. But all soils here are devoid of any clay which is awful situation because it retains minerals.  So lacking clay we have to move onto humus to retain nutrients. Wood chip mulch turns into humus.

You go out to the mucky soils around the Okeechobee where a lot of FL vegetables are grown. Muck=humus so it can retain some of the fertilizers and nutrients the commercial farmers put down

z

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #19 on: April 25, 2012, 08:35:18 PM »
I've read that mangoes and other trees actually tend to be more prone to the lack-of-magnesium problem in sandy soils especially when it receives a lot of water. My guess would be due to lots of drainage/leeching which basically rinses out the minerals from the roots.
Alexi

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2012, 09:32:37 PM »


Its sand for at least a few feet down, maybe more

So I doubt you have an alkaline situation like Jeff or me we both have houses in the 33321. But all soils here are devoid of any clay which is awful situation because it retains minerals.  So lacking clay we have to move onto humus to retain nutrients. Wood chip mulch turns into humus.

You go out to the mucky soils around the Okeechobee where a lot of FL vegetables are grown. Muck=humus so it can retain some of the fertilizers and nutrients the commercial farmers put down

z

Muck is what its called in Belle Glade, which has as its motto "Her Soil is Her Fortune"

My husband was born and raised there and EVERYTHING grows.   His parents have Eugenia bushes that are 5 feet thick and 15 feet tall. They also have a Pecan  Tree, which wont grow here in West Palm.

Would compost help the micronutrient situation? 


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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2012, 10:02:19 PM »
Compost does provide micronutrients.  BUT, if all your compost is from plants grown on Zinc-deficient sands, your compost will be very low in Zinc.  Etc. 

"Robbing Peter to pay Paul"--- taking the vegetative wastes from an acre or more to mulch a city lot--- sheet composting the whole lot, a foot thick with unchipped trimmings and leaves, about once a year--- will eventually provide most of the plants' mineral needs.
Har

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #22 on: April 26, 2012, 11:53:10 AM »
Yep, it also depends on the plant. My mangoes are doing spectacular. However, the more ph-sensitive plants (eg, carambola) look horrible no matter how much compost they get; those I have to hit with keyplex several times a year.

It's also nice diverting tree trimmer waste from the landfill to the city lot.

Compost does provide micronutrients.  BUT, if all your compost is from plants grown on Zinc-deficient sands, your compost will be very low in Zinc.  Etc. 

"Robbing Peter to pay Paul"--- taking the vegetative wastes from an acre or more to mulch a city lot--- sheet composting the whole lot, a foot thick with unchipped trimmings and leaves, about once a year--- will eventually provide most of the plants' mineral needs.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2017, 01:53:53 AM »
Thank you for the cheap source information.

Another source is the Hi-Yield brand.

Old Bridge Chemical in New Jersey sells several grades of Zinc sulfate.

It is important to know which compound you are working with:

Zinc sulfate monohydrate (specific gravity around 3.28) is very concentrated;

Zinc sulfate heptahydrate (SG around 1.97) is much less concentrated, because it has 7 molecules of water bound in it instead of 1.

If a recommendation does not specify which Zinc sulfate molecule is being talked about, to be on the safe side, assume that the recommendation is for the heptahydrate.  If what you have is monohydrate and you don't know how to calculate chemical moles, use only about 1/6 of the recommended amount.

I didn't lay hand on a specific recommendation for mangos just now, the recommendation for heptahydrate on cherimoya leaves is 1 gram per liter of water.

You said the zinc monohydrate is concentrated, my question is on how many tbsp of zinc monohydrate do u put on a 5 gallon home depot bucket?

Thanks

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Re: Zinc and its application to the Mango Tree
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2017, 09:24:22 PM »
1 to 2 teaspoons.
Har

 

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