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Author Topic: Multiple rootstock grafting  (Read 46405 times)

fruitnursery

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #100 on: September 18, 2013, 10:42:50 AM »
Hi,

Regarding multiple rootstock. In my experience, the method is useful for annual bearing fruit trees. But for some fruit trees that biennial or shy bearing, it is not that useful in terms fruit production.

Multiple rootstock or nurse grafting is used mostly for fruitrees that are on the verge of dying because of root disease or because you're area is a typhoon stricken location.

In thailand, they use this method to preserve their durian gene bank plantation. In indonesia, they use this for mangosteen for faster growth. In my rambutan tree, it causes early fruiting and extension of fruiting.  In my r2e2 mango, it causes off season fruiting. My r2e2 mango tree is now producing 3 times a year of fruit.

That is interesting,  which has me thinking what role rootstock has on the bearing times of trees,  I mean what would happen if you were to use seeds from an early, mid and late variety fruit, as rootstock.   would this change the fruiting season of the grafts?

Its easy to assume that the grafted ( top ) of the tree is the head and determines the harvest dates, but its not unreasonable to think that the rootstock has some influence.

Using of multiple rootstock technique can alter the natural psysiological growth of a fruit tree. Thats why you need to experiment for results before using it if its works for the best or not.
Tropical fruit collector enthusiast

northborneo

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #101 on: March 28, 2014, 02:45:32 AM »



This is what inarched durian seedling cross section looks like.. It was a successful union but somehow got infected at the joint (Pith/xylem) area. Note the Xylem size of Durio Graveolens.

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #102 on: April 24, 2014, 05:50:18 PM »
here is a loquat I recently grafted with two rootstocks...I guess it's a cocktail tree...lol.





simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #103 on: August 19, 2015, 10:26:18 AM »
Does anyone have updates on their multiple rootstock fruit trees? I'm especially interested in Kevin and Jackfruitwhisperer69's Frankenstein plants.  I'm really interested in this technology. It is especially interesting how some of the Durian trees rootstocks died, possibly from Phytopthora and the tree and many of its additional rootstocks are still alive.

Earlier in this thread, someone asked about wether it's better to approach graft mango first and then graft the selected scion on top or graft the scion onto the single rootstock first and then approach graft. After performing many Double Stone Grafts, I've found it best to do it at the same time. See this thread: http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=16549.0. As Kevin already mentioned, the younger green wood is easier to work with because it's more pliable and you get higher percentage of takes.

The Double Stone Graft technique for mango utilizes young mango seedlings in the copper leaf stage because at this stage, the seedling is still utilizing the seed as a food source. It seems reasonable to assume that most dicots will will be easier to approach graft very soon after sprouting due to the fact they will still be depending on the seed for energy.

Those interested may want to experiment with more difficult to graft fruiting plants utilizing earlier stage or newly sprouted seedlings. This may give better results for plants like Mangosteen. I would assume that many of us that have grafted Mangosteen have performed the grafts when the seedlings have formed several true leaves which I am guessing is past the ideal stage.

Simon

Jsvand5

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Re: Multiple rootstock graftingt
« Reply #104 on: August 19, 2015, 11:07:21 AM »
x
« Last Edit: August 19, 2015, 11:51:31 AM by Jsvand5 »

stuartdaly88

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #105 on: August 19, 2015, 07:11:14 PM »
I have two young mexican garcinias approach grafted together and fused quite nicely. The one is growing normal speed but the bigger side seems faster than the ungrafed ones I can take pics if anyone wants to see:)
I went through a grafting experiment phase and killed alot of plants :'( so glad these guys made it through.

I also tried cherimoya on soursop and it looked like they fused but they all died soon as I topped them.
Gonna graft two Achachairus together for fun next but I'm wary this time!
« Last Edit: August 19, 2015, 07:15:02 PM by stuartdaly88 »
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #106 on: August 19, 2015, 09:13:55 PM »
I'd love to see some pictures. That's a good idea about multi rootstock Mexican Garcinia as they tend to grow extremely slowly at first.

Simon

stuartdaly88

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #107 on: August 20, 2015, 05:07:45 AM »
I will try take some better pictures tonight after work. The larger part has 8 leaves and the smaller one only 4 similar to my other single mex garcinias in the same conditions. It slowly looks like it is becoming one trunk:) This was taken a few months ago


Please dont just my grafting too harshly im an ultimate rookie :'( This is the only success I have had so far but I wont give up yet:)
« Last Edit: August 20, 2015, 05:12:00 AM by stuartdaly88 »
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #108 on: June 18, 2016, 02:31:03 PM »
How is everyone's multiple rootstock plants doing? Has anyone planted their multiple rootstock trees into the ground? Anyone get fruit from their trees yet? Thanks,

Simon

barath

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #109 on: June 19, 2016, 02:25:31 PM »
I still haven't planted my multirootstock mangoes in the ground (I don't really have a place to plant them anyway).  They're still lagging behind the single rootstock mangoes I grafted at the same time -- they've put out probably half the growth.  They're all in 5 gallon pots -- not sure if that's the issue (maybe the multirootstock trees have more roots?).

simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #110 on: June 19, 2016, 04:53:41 PM »
Hey Barath,

Something sounds wrong as the multiple rootstock trees should be growing faster than the single rootstock trees. The pot size should not be the issue since the single rootstock trees are in the same type of pot. Do you have any pictures of your double and single rootstock trees? Did you use Monoembryonic seeds from a vigorous variety such as Kent, Haden or Tommy Atkins?

I get slow growth from Polyembryonic seedlings. Did you use the exact same type of seeds for both your single and multiple rootstock trees?

Simon

barath

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #111 on: June 19, 2016, 08:38:07 PM »
Hey Barath,

Something sounds wrong as the multiple rootstock trees should be growing faster than the single rootstock trees. The pot size should not be the issue since the single rootstock trees are in the same type of pot. Do you have any pictures of your double and single rootstock trees? Did you use Monoembryonic seeds from a vigorous variety such as Kent, Haden or Tommy Atkins?

I get slow growth from Polyembryonic seedlings. Did you use the exact same type of seeds for both your single and multiple rootstock trees?

Simon

I think that must be the issue -- they're all polyembryonic seedlings (or I'm pretty sure they are), from store-bought Manila mangoes.

I'll save some Kent or Hayden next time.

How are the Indian seeds as seedlings?  I was saving some of the Banganapalli seeds from the recent fruits I bought but tossed the seeds eventually because they got moldy before I had a chance to plant them.  I wonder if Kesars are in the stores around here now.

simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #112 on: June 19, 2016, 09:25:17 PM »
Indian mango seeds work great as rootstock but don't use the irradiated ones from India as they will not sprout. I used Alphonso, Mallika and Kesar mango seeds from my tree and my friends tree.

If you use polyembryonic seeds, you can perfom greenwood graft or wait until the second year of growth so that the seedling is stronger and more vigorous. The more vigorous your rootstock, the faster the growth of your tree.

Simon

barath

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #113 on: June 20, 2016, 12:05:32 AM »
Indian mango seeds work great as rootstock but don't use the irradiated ones from India as they will not sprout. I used Alphonso, Mallika and Kesar mango seeds from my tree and my friends tree.

If you use polyembryonic seeds, you can perfom greenwood graft or wait until the second year of growth so that the seedling is stronger and more vigorous. The more vigorous your rootstock, the faster the growth of your tree.

Simon

Interesting, thanks.  I forgot about the fact that the mangoes from India were irradiated...it was dumb of me to save seeds!

Guanabanus

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #114 on: June 20, 2016, 05:27:21 PM »
Does the irradiation guarantee no germination?   Or does it make for interesting mutants?
Har

simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #115 on: June 20, 2016, 08:40:09 PM »
The irradiation causes most of the seeds to not germinate. Out of about 30 seeds, I got about one third that looked like they were starting to grow and then all of a sudden, they would stop growing. They never sprouted a stalk, I believe what appeared to be growing was actually swelling of the seed from absorption of water. I only got a couple to sprout and I didn't keep track of them so I'm not sure if they survived in the end.

I know that low level radiation can be used to cause mutations such as what they did with W Murcott to create a seedless W Murcott marketed as a Tango tangerine.

Simon

barath

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #116 on: June 20, 2016, 09:48:30 PM »
Does anyone know if Haitian mangoes are irradiated?  I got some of the Francique Haitian mangoes today.

00christian00

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #117 on: February 14, 2017, 04:24:56 AM »
Did anyone try to keep both plants alive, not just the rootstock?
What would happen if let's say you grow 2 mango varieties and let both of them grow? If one rootstock die will both plants live because they are grafted?

fruit4me

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #118 on: April 13, 2017, 09:26:39 PM »
Grafted a double rootstock peach cobbler for a friend. Rootstocks were from super market fruits, most likely kents or Tommy Atkins. It was planted somtime last year. Full of flowers now, waiting  for right time to remove.







geosulcata

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #119 on: April 13, 2017, 09:43:38 PM »
My husband does a lot of in-arch grafting of multiple seedling rootstocks on his grafted jackfruit trees. It seems to help push the growth of the trees.



(edited to post video)
« Last Edit: April 13, 2017, 09:48:57 PM by geosulcata »

birngerd

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #120 on: June 01, 2019, 09:44:15 AM »
Here are pictures of my multi-rootstock Cotton Candy Mango. I tried to pick rootstocks that were distinct from each-other so they might compete more. So far, the rootstocks are seedlings from Lemon Zest, Cotton Candy, Nam Doc Mai, Turpentine, Tommy Atkins, and a local no ID mango. I plan to add some non-indica Mangifera species to it as I'm able to acquire them (I think I have a source for M. casturi and M. zeylanica, I'm still looking for M. odorata). I'm not sure what to expect with all of the rootstocks, but I like the aesthetic at least, so as long as it's not hurting the plant I'll probably keep adding rootstocks to get that "banyan" look. I'm going to put the tree into the ground in July, so I'll probably experiment with planting some seeds into the ground next to the tree and grafting those too to give the tree some undisturbed taproots.









« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 09:47:16 AM by birngerd »

simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #121 on: June 01, 2019, 01:19:11 PM »
My husband does a lot of in-arch grafting of multiple seedling rootstocks on his grafted jackfruit trees. It seems to help push the growth of the trees.

http://youtu.be/AzI_DDN7TeY

(edited to post video)

Geosulcata, thanks for the information and for posting the video. I enjoy the videos your family puts together. I hope you continue to make videos of all the different Mango and Lychee varieties.

Simon

simon_grow

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #122 on: June 01, 2019, 01:22:06 PM »
Here are pictures of my multi-rootstock Cotton Candy Mango. I tried to pick rootstocks that were distinct from each-other so they might compete more. So far, the rootstocks are seedlings from Lemon Zest, Cotton Candy, Nam Doc Mai, Turpentine, Tommy Atkins, and a local no ID mango. I plan to add some non-indica Mangifera species to it as I'm able to acquire them (I think I have a source for M. casturi and M. zeylanica, I'm still looking for M. odorata). I'm not sure what to expect with all of the rootstocks, but I like the aesthetic at least, so as long as it's not hurting the plant I'll probably keep adding rootstocks to get that "banyan" look. I'm going to put the tree into the ground in July, so I'll probably experiment with planting some seeds into the ground next to the tree and grafting those too to give the tree some undisturbed taproots.










Birngerd, thatís an awesome experiment. Iím glad others in Florida are testing out the multiple rootstock trees. From my experiments, it seems to push the tree to produce at a very young age and keeps the tree more compact.

Simon

birngerd

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #123 on: June 01, 2019, 02:40:40 PM »

Birngerd, thatís an awesome experiment. Iím glad others in Florida are testing out the multiple rootstock trees. From my experiments, it seems to push the tree to produce at a very young age and keeps the tree more compact.

Simon

I have a small yard, so compactness would be a plus. I plan on starting the same process with Pickering mango soon, so we'll see how that turns out!

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #124 on: December 02, 2019, 01:18:36 PM »
This is really an intriguing topic.

What specific grafts/cuts do we think are most successful?

Also - perhaps a dumb question, how do you tell if the graft is successful? Clearly when you're dealing with scion grafts, it either takes or it doesn't and the signs are obvious.

 

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