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Author Topic: Multiple rootstock grafting  (Read 11082 times)

TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #25 on: January 31, 2012, 07:03:16 AM »
Very nice!  Now that is the result we're looking for.  Bryan Brunner demonstrated that method of grafting for us while visiting a few years back.  Makes for a nice clean look.  Thanks for sharing that.  J

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #26 on: January 31, 2012, 08:07:09 AM »
I glad you liked  the pics! :) This year I'm going to graft two rootstocks on a orange tree that I grafted last year!

 I saw that you done alot multi-root grafting! have you tried using Garcinia xanthochymus for an approach rootstock for Mangosteen?

Regards
Steven
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TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2012, 08:40:40 AM »
No I haven't, Steven...getting material to work with is not easy. 

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #28 on: January 31, 2012, 10:58:23 AM »
Very nice looking graft!  :)

Future

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2012, 08:50:22 AM »
Thanks for this detailed post and reviving a topic I looked at years ago on GW.   have yet to master the art of grafting but I have tried planting several seeds and seeing if they would fuse into one tree on their own.  So far I have a cashew that appears to have fused.  Trying this also on jackfruit and sugar apple.  The differing species aspect I was not aware of so thanks for this added info.  On a differing not I have also experimented with multiple annuals in one hole (okra, beans, squash) with mixed results so far.

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #30 on: April 27, 2012, 05:39:39 PM »
Hey Ohiojay, have you attempted any more multiple rootstock grafts?  Is there any new information out there.  I tried to go back to Bernie Dizon's website but all the links are now gone!  While doing some research on multiple rootstock technology, I found a thread where you mentioned you watched a DVD regarding multiple rootstock technology, do you have a link or website where I can purchase this DVD? 

Several months ago, I innarched my Maha Chanok mango with a Manilla mango but my technique was absolutely terrible.  It was my first attempt at grafting mango and I was not prepared for the extremely hard woody material on the main trunks where a leaf grows from the main trunk.  I tried to make a single long cut of about 6 inches down the side of both my Maha Chanok and the Manilla Mango and everytime I hit an area where a leaf used to be, my knife would stop and my single cut became about 12 whittling cuts.  My cuts were so uneven and wavy that I was barely able to get any cambium to match.  Now, several months later, I have two portions of my graft that have fused.  One of the segments that fused was on the upper portion of my graft and is about 1/2 and inch long and the other portion that fused is on the lower portion of my graft and about 1/4 inch has fused.  I topped my Manilla Mango when I did the innarching but the Manilla mango has since sprouted new branches which I will remove this weekend.  I wouldn't call my multiple rootstock attempt a success but it is not a complete failure.  I will just have to keep my eye on the Manilla rootstock and pinch back any growth untill the Maha Chanok completely takes over.

Because all my Lychees are air layered and have weak root systems, I would like to add additional rootstocks to them but I would really like to check out that DVD or CD before attempting these grafts.  Thanks in advance!
Simon

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #31 on: April 27, 2012, 08:29:31 PM »
Considering the vigour of maprangs it seems hardly worth it to multiple rootstock.I suppose if you had a one of the giant wans and wanted to mollycoddle it it kinda would be more experimental.With durians multiple rootstocks is more hardcore and useful.The juvenile period can be shaved down to 4 years for montongs and gaan yeows.

TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #32 on: April 28, 2012, 08:57:19 AM »
No such thing as maprang and vigour.  Simon...the video came from a friend in the Philippines demonstrating their longkong multiple rootstock grafting.  I just recently grafted an achachairu seedling to a grafted achachairu plant.  Why?  Just to see what the results might be.  I have others to do but just no time to do them right now.  I never decapitate the nurse plant until I'm positive the graft was a success and on its way.  Good luck!

Mike T

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #33 on: April 28, 2012, 09:10:25 AM »
My mayon chids took off after 3 years  and they do speed up.Trees of friends and my brother needed serious trimming to control them.When you see the huge seedling examples in thailand you realise they not that far behind mangoes once they get going.   

HMHausman

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2012, 02:17:20 PM »
My mayon chids took off after 3 years  and they do speed up.Trees of friends and my brother needed serious trimming to control them.When you see the huge seedling examples in thailand you realise they not that far behind mangoes once they get going.   

Well...that is welcomed news.  I can't wait for my Kai Maprang to go "mango" on me growth-wise. 

Harry
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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2012, 03:06:19 PM »
I'm going to multi-root graft some Jacks...hoping It will drop atleast 2 years of waiting for them to produced!

Has anybody tried multi-rootstock for Jackfruit?
Steven Silva

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Guanabanus

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2012, 05:39:37 PM »
Good job, Steven.  That is what I was going to suggest.  I believe I have heard that called "in-arching" also.  Once the graft has taken, it does not have to go through the stress of a later decapitation.
Har

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #37 on: April 29, 2012, 02:46:46 PM »
Good job, Steven.  That is what I was going to suggest.  I believe I have heard that called "in-arching" also.  Once the graft has taken, it does not have to go through the stress of a later decapitation.

Hi Har,
Thanks for the compliment :)

Yes, your right...it is called ''in-arching''
Steven Silva

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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #38 on: April 29, 2012, 03:26:04 PM »
Hi :),

The Lucuma seedling is 2 year old and a year ago I planted another lucuma seeds for inarching...It took very well :)



This year I decided to graft the double rootstock with a scion from my grafted ''La Molina'' tree! The graft was done about 2 weeks ago and it's still alive and kick'n ;D ;D ;D

Thanks to Berto and a knowledgeable gentleman who shall remain anonymous :-X for giving me excellent info and advice on grafting Pouterias and in this case Lucuma...Many thanks my fellow friends...I owe you guys one  ;) ;) ;)
 






Steven Silva

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Guanabanus

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #39 on: April 29, 2012, 11:22:55 PM »
I believe that there should be a plastic bag over this leafy-scioned cleft graft.
Har

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #40 on: April 30, 2012, 03:11:57 AM »
My mayon chids took off after 3 years  and they do speed up.Trees of friends and my brother needed serious trimming to control them.When you see the huge seedling examples in thailand you realise they not that far behind mangoes once they get going.   

Well...that is welcomed news.  I can't wait for my Kai Maprang to go "mango" on me growth-wise. 

Harry

Hate to be the spoiler, but at your latitude the maprang will never grow as fast as a mango. But Mike is right in that once they get to be a few years old they speed up, just don't expect warp speed. LOL
Oscar

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #41 on: April 30, 2012, 05:39:39 AM »
I believe that there should be a plastic bag over this leafy-scioned cleft graft.

Hi Har,

 I removed it so that I can take a pic. ;)
Steven Silva

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HMHausman

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #42 on: April 30, 2012, 04:48:25 PM »
I do notice substantial growth with my maprang.  Buds swell for what seems like eternity, then one day you come out to look and they have all burst out with new growth that really adds substantial inches to the size of the tree.  I could see that once the tree gets some size that the growth would become geometric and that will be something to behold if I can get the tree to some size.

Harry
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Tropicdude

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #43 on: June 30, 2012, 04:36:38 PM »
I really want to practice on this, I read through this post again, maybe I missed it, but where does one unite the two rootstock ? above or below the scion graft?

lots of cheap seedling mangoes will be available soon and I want to try this out.

I read that it is suggested that you first must graft your scion then add the other rootstocks later, but I was wondering if one could just graft the scoins after the rootstock have been combined.
William
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CoPlantNut

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #44 on: August 28, 2012, 02:57:15 PM »
I've been practicing my approach grafts by planting all the seeds from jackfruit I've eaten this summer.  I've got a number of little "Frankenstein" jackfruit plants with 3, 4, 5 and 6 rootstocks (mostly not siblings) grafted onto a single top.  My observation so far is that the multi-rootstock plants are sending out larger leaves with shorter internodes than single-rootstock seedlings, and are starting to send out side branches where similar-age single rootstock seedlings are not.  The oldest of my seedlings are only 14 weeks old at this point, so it's still too early to tell if the 6-rootstock plants are different or better than the 3-rootstock plants.

Sample 3-rootstock plant (with two more seedlings to be grafted on):

Sample 5-rootstock plant, with 3 more seedlings:


Sadly I don't have the room to run a proper experiment to see what various numbers of rootstocks would do over time...  But if 2 rootstocks is better than 1, is 3 better than 2?  Is 5 better yet?  How about 10 or 20?  At what point would adding more rootstocks be detrimental?

I'm thinking of grafting a few of my existing multi-rootstock plants together to form a plant with 10 or 15 rootstocks (from 9 different fruits, so there will be some sibling rootstocks) just to see what it would do, but I'm curious if anyone has any experience with large numbers of rootstocks on a single plant.

I'll be breaking my own rule of not growing fruit I can get in a "decent" form in local stores if I keep a jackfruit plant over the winter, but perhaps I can make an exception for one with a large number of rootstocks just for the curiosity factor.

Incidentally, after doing about 150 approach grafts so far, I've found on jackfruits that they take much better if the trunk is still green; once it is woody it takes a lot longer to heal and the success rate drops from about 90% to around 50%.  If the supplemental rootstock is still green but being grafted onto a woody trunk, I get about 75% take.  If I was doing the grafting late at night when I was tired, that also negatively affects the success rate.

   Kevin

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #45 on: August 28, 2012, 04:05:06 PM »
Quote
Incidentally, after doing about 150 approach grafts so far, I've found on jackfruits that they take much better if the trunk is still green; once it is woody it takes a lot longer to heal and the success rate drops from about 90% to around 50%.  If the supplemental rootstock is still green but being grafted onto a woody trunk, I get about 75% take.  If I was doing the grafting late at night when I was tired, that also negatively affects the success rate.

What would be better for mangoes, at green stage or woody? or is it all the same? 
William
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CoPlantNut

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #46 on: August 28, 2012, 04:24:45 PM »
Quote
Incidentally, after doing about 150 approach grafts so far, I've found on jackfruits that they take much better if the trunk is still green; once it is woody it takes a lot longer to heal and the success rate drops from about 90% to around 50%.  If the supplemental rootstock is still green but being grafted onto a woody trunk, I get about 75% take.  If I was doing the grafting late at night when I was tired, that also negatively affects the success rate.

What would be better for mangoes, at green stage or woody? or is it all the same?

I've only done 2 mango approach grafts so far, both in green stage, with no failures yet, but I can't say anything about doing it with woody mango stems yet.  I would guess that it would be easier and more likely to take in the green-stem stage for almost any plant just due to increased pliability, but that's just a guess.

  Kevin

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #47 on: August 28, 2012, 11:32:56 PM »
green stage
Har

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #48 on: August 29, 2012, 12:43:12 AM »
Thanks for the tips, I only have a few seedlings to experiment with so, want to raise the chances of success.  just another question, if I have a small tree, lets say 2 years old, and want to add additional rootstock to it, can I still use green to woody grafts or should I in this case go woody with woody?
William
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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #49 on: August 30, 2012, 11:44:30 AM »
Hi Kevin,
Those multi-root grafted Jacks look freak'n AWESOME 8) I totally agree with you...green stage has far higher takes than woody ;) I will inarch my Jacks, next year at 30 cm/12in height, so that I get some fruits below the graft union, on both rootstocks 8) I was also thinking of adding more rootstocks as the tree grows...more nutrients and water is absorbed, trees grows much faster, wind tolerant and production will be much earlier than grafted or seedling Jacks 8)

I have seen a Durian with 15 or + rootstocks 8) So...Sky's the limit ;D ;D ;D

Thanks a bunch for sharing :)
Steven Silva

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