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Author Topic: Grimal is not Plinia spiritosantensis, most likely "Peluda-de-alagoas"  (Read 21488 times)

shah8

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Re: Grimal is not Plinia spiritosantensis, most likely "Peluda-de-alagoas"
« Reply #75 on: January 18, 2017, 09:13:31 PM »
My grimal grows best in the sunroom because of the issues with rust.  Outside, new growth is pretty quickly killed off.

Mango Stein

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anyone know the significance of the reference to the Holy Spirit in the latin name?

the region it's from is Espirito Santo

Coincidentally, there is one variety of P. spiritosantensis that does have a clear, cross-shaped scar. It is called jabuticaba-peluda-de-cruz (hairy cross). The common name of the species is jabuticaba roxa (purple).
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 06:48:03 AM by Mango Stein »
There's no such thing as "ultra tropical"

arvind

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Re: Grimal is not Plinia spiritosantensis, most likely "Peluda-de-alagoas"
« Reply #77 on: August 10, 2017, 05:45:19 AM »
Ha! definitely staying in a pot for a while till I get it big enough and then amend the hell out of the clay first. So we'll compare notes in 10 years! Ha ha ha

seems like most of the jabuticabas love that red/clay type of soil.
The red soil that you assume as clay is not clay.Here in malaysia we have a similar soil.Its iron rich and slightly acidic at 6 ph.Its well draining and when wet you cannot roll it into sausage shape unlike real clay.Very fertile too.Here one truck of this soil is sold at 45usd which is expensive considering the exchange rate.Its the number 1 choice used by landscaper and the local council in gardens and parks

 

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