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Author Topic: Wet feet successful trees?  (Read 5031 times)

Tropheus76

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Wet feet successful trees?
« on: July 22, 2014, 07:57:38 AM »
Well since we have had more rain than I have seen since I have been here and currently I have two figs, a jujube, and a yuzu citrus sitting under about 4 -6 inches of water I think its time I reevaluate my lower front yard area. Note before last week I have never had standing water in this area, but then we have never had downpours of this magnitude everyday since I have been here. If these guys die off I will have to build mounds to plant whatever I replace them with. So that said what are some oddball subtropical -9B  fruit trees I can replace them with that like lots of water? I have all-spice and lychee trees in the back yard that regularly get submerged(and the all-spice are on foot tall mounds) and don't seem to care so something along that level of hardiness would be awesome.

bsbullie

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2014, 08:12:08 AM »
Not anything to do with wet feet, except the yuzu wont like it but just a few comments in case you weren't aware.  You are pushing the zone limits with the Allspice in 9b.  It may need cokd protection.

From what I understand,  you have a jujube in your front yard?  Just so you know, that is one eyesore of a tree.  Something you wou l d more want in your backyard and not to be any direct vision or focal point.
- Rob

greenman62

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2014, 08:25:32 AM »
i know what you mean.
Here in New Orleans, we get a lot of water as it is
(top 10 rainfall cities - or top 5? i forgot)

in the last 2 years, it has increased. Winter, spring, summer, fall...
just increased heavy rainfall, sometimes every day for a week.
Unfortunately, my house was built on a swamp that was filled in with river sand 35 years ago.
but, it still gets standing water.
i have a pond where the liner broke, so it always reflects the water table.
most of the time, i see water 8-10 inches below the soil level
heavy rainfalls, or times when it rains a lot,
it can stay almost soil level for days at a time.

my satsuma orange does well.
Jujube is doing great!
my mulberry does well surprisingly (its a local volunteer)
 my guava does well.
i grow papaya and everything else on mounds or containers...

I have a baby jackfruit that hasnt died yet, but isnt growing fast either
i think due to water stress.
Passionfruit (Maypop) is on a 2 inch mound and going OK
Avocado did OK for years until last years freeze.

I have a Jaboticaba i hear can take weeks of wet feet.
i may put that in the ground soon.

these 2 should be tolerant of standing water...
American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana, zones 4 to 9)
Paw paw (Asimina triloba, zones 5 to 9)

some info here may help.
http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/content/81/4/475.full.pdf

one part says it (temp flooding) helps lower PH of soils
in Southern Fla which can be beneficial


you can always plant water chestnut and lotus :)




Tropheus76

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2014, 08:42:56 AM »
BSbullie- Have had the all-spice for several years now haven't had any cold issues even with the surprise frosts we had last winter.(They said low of 37, it wasn't). Wasn't aware of the jujube appearance thing but it is in the middle of the front yard about the third tree back in the second row of trees so once the other trees fill out a bit, this guy will be hardly noticeable. I built a butterfly garden around my apple/persimmon grove so it looked a little nicer in the winter. Not to mention I have a 6-8 foot saw palm "hedgerow" across the front along the road further blocking line of sight into the yard.

Greenman- Hmm didn't even think of Jabos, I have two along my driveway and the lowest spot(currently occupied by a dying fig) would be a perfect place for one of those. So mulberry is a pretty water tolerant tree? That was one I was thinking about. How is the fruit on those taste-wise? Guava is another good option. Maybe I will move the one I have that's high and dry down there and replace it with the Yuzu if it doesn't die from drowning.

bsbullie

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2014, 09:52:16 AM »
Jaboticaba should do well where the yard holds water plus it is an extremely ornamental tree.  A win - win.  There are many  different kinds of "jaboticaba" so you could really benefit from the fruit and looks.
- Rob

murahilin

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2014, 12:31:58 PM »
BSbullie- Have had the all-spice for several years now haven't had any cold issues even with the surprise frosts we had last winter.(They said low of 37, it wasn't). Wasn't aware of the jujube appearance thing but it is in the middle of the front yard about the third tree back in the second row of trees so once the other trees fill out a bit, this guy will be hardly noticeable. I built a butterfly garden around my apple/persimmon grove so it looked a little nicer in the winter. Not to mention I have a 6-8 foot saw palm "hedgerow" across the front along the road further blocking line of sight into the yard.

Greenman- Hmm didn't even think of Jabos, I have two along my driveway and the lowest spot(currently occupied by a dying fig) would be a perfect place for one of those. So mulberry is a pretty water tolerant tree? That was one I was thinking about. How is the fruit on those taste-wise? Guava is another good option. Maybe I will move the one I have that's high and dry down there and replace it with the Yuzu if it doesn't die from drowning.

The appearance issue that BSBullie is referring to is dependent on the species of jujube. The Chinese jujube is a prettier tree than the Indian jujube trees that we have in Florida.

gnappi

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2014, 07:46:31 PM »
So mulberry is a pretty water tolerant tree? That was one I was thinking about. How is the fruit on those taste-wise? Guava is another good option. Maybe I will move the one I have that's high and dry down there and replace it with the Yuzu if it doesn't die from drowning.

My mulberry is in my swale, it loves it there.My jabo was in a neighbor's broken sprinkler for a few weeks and even with the rain we've had recently has no problem.

Mulberry is one of my fave fruits when picked fully ripe, they are very sweet, if you like a bit of tart you can pick them with some red still showing and they are also good. Mine fruit early, a nice start to the fruit season.

Regards,

   Gary

bangkok

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2014, 12:00:09 AM »
My mango and pomelo have been in the flooding for 3 weeks. The water was 60 cm or 2 feet high. No problem.

Tropheus76

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2014, 07:46:19 AM »
I also have a pomelo just barely outside the flood zone so I know its roots are there. I pulled the Yuzu and put it in a pot to dry out under the eaves of my house. Hopefully moved it in time. Water had finally stopped running out of it this morning.

Cant do mangos unfortunately, it gets too cold here and freezes down to the roots. I planted one a few years back and pulled it after two years and replanted it in my hill of forgotten trees. A small hill I replant stuff I pull giving them a fighting chance outside of my care. It hasn't gotten above 15" since.

Think I am going to go with another Guava and depending on if my other fig goes, start with a bigger jaboticaba. All on low mounds. Was going to go mulberry but reading online about them has very negative reviews. Need to see if there is any kind of alcohol I can make from Guava and Jabo. For some reason I haven't looked.

gunnar429

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2014, 03:46:34 PM »
could always try grafting an annona of choice onto pond apple.  I believe david garcia has a. reticulata on pond apple growing out of his fish pond.
~Jeff

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gunnar429

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2014, 02:44:04 PM »
http://toptropicals.com/downloads/cold,P20hardiness,P20fruit.pdf.pagespeed.ce.92lK3dKbhq.pdf

This document is a rough guide, and from TT, so who knows how accurate, but it has basic info on shade-loving, cold-tolerance, etc.

According to this doc, black sapote is also flood tolerant (along with coconut and jaboticaba).

Also, if lychee or longan are air-layered (and possibly for all air-layered trees  :-\ ???), they can tolerate flooding as long as soil is mounded up around the trunk.  Chris Rollins showed a picture of longans in the mekong delta during flood season.  This won't work for grafted longan/lychee trees though--only air-layered
~Jeff

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Tropheus76

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2014, 03:25:55 PM »
My grafted lychee, pretty sure its grafted anyway sat under a foot of water for about a week this summer. It got covered in new leaves soon afterwards. Hoping for blooms this spring. I keep hearing that black sapote is more cold hardy than the internet hive mind gives it credit for. I might try a tree in the near future. I have a good spot in mind for it.

gunnar429

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #12 on: December 16, 2014, 03:38:05 PM »
My grafted lychee, pretty sure its grafted anyway sat under a foot of water for about a week this summer. It got covered in new leaves soon afterwards. Hoping for blooms this spring. I keep hearing that black sapote is more cold hardy than the internet hive mind gives it credit for. I might try a tree in the near future. I have a good spot in mind for it.

What makes you think it's grafted?  I know we usually buy grafted trees, but with lychee and longan, they are commonly air-layered.  It is possible, and last year there were a few grafted emperor lychees, but unless you grafted it, or had it specifically grafted, I would say it's an air-layer.
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

greenman62

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2014, 05:26:59 PM »

. I keep hearing that black sapote is more cold hardy than the internet hive mind gives it credit for. I might try a tree in the near future. I have a good spot in mind for it.


i have several sub-tropicals that just went through 1 night at 27F
it only lasted a few hours below 32, but most of these were in pots.
not protected at all.

the lychees were not bothered at all (6 - 12 inches tall)
the Jabo had minor leaf loss (3ft tall)
the starfruit had no problems
3 Jackfruit had leaf loss, but seems OK now, 1 died. (1 to 2 ft tall)
1 black sapote died, 2 still recovering (about 1 ft tall)
the guavas had minor leaf loss
several papaya (3ft to 6ft) ... 1 died, 3 had leaf loss, but seem OK now.
several small papaya (2ft and under) 2 died, the rest are damaged.
4 Loquat, all OK (2 ft tall)
1 Mamey - 3ft tall - still unsure if it will pull through - major leaf loss.

i was really surprised at how well the Jabo handled it.
it showed no signs at all of a problem
until a week after the freeze, then it lost about %15 of its leaves
but seems OK now.

several small Lychees did not seem bothered one bit
(grown from seed last year)
if nothing else, they will be great rootstock.

i thought the Mamey would have handled it better.
and it was the most protected of the bunch !

Jabo right-rear / Lychee (small) between the Aloes + Guava in black 5gal


Mango, (Florigon) small leaf-burn spots


Papaya TR Hovey leaf loss + MAMEY


bangkok

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2014, 07:45:53 PM »
I 've read somewhere that pommetia pinnata (Fiji longan) can also stand floodings.

BMc

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #15 on: December 16, 2014, 09:32:22 PM »
Achachairu seem very tolerant of wet feet. The farm up north had flood water for a month that wiped out citrus orchards in the area, but the garcinias were fine. The fruit was just less sweet.

bangkok

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2014, 02:30:26 AM »
Achachairu seem very tolerant of wet feet. The farm up north had flood water for a month that wiped out citrus orchards in the area, but the garcinias were fine. The fruit was just less sweet.

Maybe pomelo can stand floodings better then, mine was 3 weeks in 50 cm water and survived without a problem. Also my mango.
Mango tree's around our villapark were in 150 cm water for 4-6 weeks and survived but with problems.

Tropheus76

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2014, 08:14:25 AM »
That actually corresponds with findings I had as well with a pomelo that while water wasn't up the trunk, its bed and feet were definitely under water for several days(it was at the edge of and touching the open water pond I suddenly had in my front yard) and it looks great, actually in the last two months since has put out a lot of new leaves.

arvind

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2017, 06:53:53 AM »
I 've read somewhere that pommetia pinnata (Fiji longan) can also stand floodings.
Thats true since in its native habitat it grows along riverbank

Tropicdude

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Re: Wet feet successful trees?
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2017, 02:06:00 AM »
The most insatiable potted plant i have when it comes to water,  is my Grumichama,  not sure how it would react to wet feet,  but sure is a thirsty plant.   I think it is one of the more attractive plants I have. 
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

 

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