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Author Topic: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree  (Read 26063 times)

naturelover

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #75 on: August 05, 2014, 01:33:50 PM »
And did he mean weeds around thev tree or weeds right up against the trunk?


http://youtu.be/agr8UCAb7kc


He is speaking about Biden Flowers here- they arent really weeds because they planted them. And  they use a weedwacker to knock them out right before mango bloom- looks a bit labor intensive to me.
I do remember that at a lecture, he showed slides and said there were weeds as well.  Perhaps he was speaking about theses Bidens? Who knows.
And in the video, it does look like there isnt anything right up against the trunk, which is always a good idea. I do believe that the root crown and the underside of the tree needs good air flow. And that the tree can rot if there is excessive moisture trapped near the trunk.

Anyway, I still think you need to give the tree more time before passing judgement....

Mr. Clean

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #76 on: August 05, 2014, 02:01:54 PM »
Really....weeds are fine in the mango orchard but growing up to the trunk is ridiculous, they are robbing the tree unless you fertilize more to compensate. I like a 3-4ft diameter of mulch around trees but others have the philosophy of a 3-4ft diameter of bare earth. Either way such fruit trees roots and feeder roots are not competing with grass and weeds.

Mr. Clean.....  Your PC is 3 times more leafy than mine. It would be even larger and  a quicker grower without those weeds hugging it

If I had more energy and more money, I might do the 3 ft bar earth/mulch.  With around 75 fruit trees/plants, the cost of mulch is a little pricey.  The labor to remove the weeds and mulch is also extensive for that many trees.  I do what I can.  My trees seem to do alright with the care given.  I fertilize like fertilizer was free.  The PC is a beautiful tree, I like the compact growth pattern.  But so far it has been an ornamental fruit tree. 
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mangomandan

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #77 on: August 05, 2014, 03:22:48 PM »
Hate to say it, but Rob is a filthy liar. I have a 15 year old cocktail mango tree composed of pina colada, sweet tart, galaxy, and orange sherbet.

For those in doubt, here's the picture:




Finally, a "cocktail" fruit tree worthy of the name. Can't wait for these to be on sale at Home Depot.............

mangomandan

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #78 on: August 05, 2014, 03:30:01 PM »
Does anyone have a picture of a productive Pina Colada mango tree?  A picture of a productive Pina Colada mango tree would really help.


My PC is very productive. A closeup from last year. Delicious fruit that do taste a bit like a pina colada and with a pineappley smell and taste.


another photo



Zands-    Do you put Pina Colada in the Elite tier group with LZ, CC, Sweet Tart, Carrie etc.? or is this a tier 2 or even tier 3 Mango?


I've only tasted 6-8 Pina Colada mangos over the last few years.  Last week I ate two, one of which was a bit tart for my taste. The other was possibly the finest damn thing I have ever tasted. I would compare it to mango candy, except that no candy could be that good.

I wonder if Patrick's care regimen was as successful with his Pina Colada as it was with Lemon Zest.


bsbullie

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #79 on: August 05, 2014, 03:33:24 PM »
Hate to say it, but Rob is a filthy liar. I have a 15 year old cocktail mango tree composed of pina colada, sweet tart, galaxy, and orange sherbet.

For those in doubt, here's the picture:




Finally, a "cocktail" fruit tree worthy of the name. Can't wait for these to be on sale at Home Depot.............


Here is the resultant harvested fruit from that tree.


- Rob

Mr. Clean

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #80 on: August 05, 2014, 11:54:53 PM »
I've only tasted 6-8 Pina Colada mangos over the last few years.  Last week I ate two, one of which was a bit tart for my taste. The other was possibly the finest damn thing I have ever tasted. I would compare it to mango candy, except that no candy could be that good.

I wonder if Patrick's care regimen was as successful with his Pina Colada as it was with Lemon Zest.

I thought Patrick removed the Pina Colada tree to make room for a Pineapple Pleasure tree.
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mangomandan

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #81 on: August 06, 2014, 12:58:53 AM »
You might be right, Mark.

I was assuming he still had it based on his comment:     "I may actually eliminate (or topwork) anything other than the new varieties.  I would much rather have Lemon Zest, Pineapple Pleasure, Pina Colada, Sweet Tart, Peach Cobbler, Providence, and Coconut Cream or Fruit Punch instead of Cogshall, Pickering, NDM, Maha Chanok, Carrie, or other older varieties."

But as you know, it's best not to assume.

zands

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #82 on: August 06, 2014, 07:07:19 AM »


If I had more energy and more money, I might do the 3 ft bar earth/mulch.  With around 75 fruit trees/plants, the cost of mulch is a little pricey.  The labor to remove the weeds and mulch is also extensive for that many trees.  I do what I can.  My trees seem to do alright with the care given.  I fertilize like fertilizer was free.  The PC is a beautiful tree, I like the compact growth pattern.  But so far it has been an ornamental fruit tree.

If you start with a good dark topsoil then more fertilizer should cover it. Should compensate for what the weeds are taking from your mangoes roots. But I would mow the weeds now. Let them decay and throw the nutrients they have robbed back into the soil. Use your mower in  a way that throws the weed debris towards the PC tree not away...obviously! I hope you have a mower. I do and may copy this approach. Actually I have done this on a large mature tree.

Plus the PC tree will look better without tall weeds near it and Mr Clean will lose all thoughts of axing it. Then next year let weeds grow back for bee pollination reasons. After pollination season mow weeds again at the highest height off ground setting on your lwan mower

For a real boost to select un-mulched trees apply some black Kow cow manure in a bag. It has that magical organic thing that modern  NPK fertilizers lacks plus will add humus since you are not using wood chips. My local Walmarts have it at $3/bag instead of the usual $5

I think it was Seadation who posted a mango pic here w grass growing up to the trunk. He fertilized to the drip line
His mango tree was doing very well as far as fruit yield

Lastly bsbullie should quit dogging your posts. My all encompassing advice is not free. You owe me ten twenty thirty PC fruits next year and for getting bsbullie-Rob off your back.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2014, 07:47:40 AM by zands »

pj1881 (Patrick)

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #83 on: August 06, 2014, 08:50:59 AM »
I currently have a branch of Pina Colada grafted onto my Pineapple Pleasure.  Its in a bit of a bad spot and hasn't kept up with the PP's growth.. I did however get a couple branches of Gary to take on the same tree, and they are growing at about the same pace.  Gary is very similar to PC in flavor to me, with a bit larger fruit.

bsbullie

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #84 on: August 06, 2014, 10:58:00 AM »
I currently have a branch of Pina Colada grafted onto my Pineapple Pleasure.  Its in a bit of a bad spot and hasn't kept up with the PP's growth.. I did however get a couple branches of Gary to take on the same tree, and they are growing at about the same pace.  Gary is very similar to PC in flavor to me, with a bit larger fruit.

Funny, I find Gary to be equal of smaller in size and a known poor producer. ..but excellent in terms of taste.  One of the reasons Gary used the Gary mango a lot in his trials was to try and get a tree that produces a fruit with taste similar to Gary but better production,  large fruit size and better texture (the texture of the Gary mango is very soft).
- Rob

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #85 on: August 06, 2014, 12:14:38 PM »
And did he mean weeds around thev tree or weeds right up against the trunk?


Not sure what he meant- he said this at a lecture and his slides did show weeds that were at least close to the trunk, I couldnt tell.

Richard has always told me to mulch and I consider him an expert as well. So differing opinions.

The downside I see logically is that weeds compete for nutrients and moisture , so the later makes sense.


Now once a tree has a significant canopy, unless you cut out most of the middle large branches, like Dr Campbell shows in his video, the shade will choke out the weeks anyway.
Walter Zill's trees have canopies and are close together so the weeds are gone from directly under the tree, but his backyard has significant weeds elsewhere so who knows what his opinion is; I've never asked . Rob, have you ever asked this?

My guess would be that the weeds pull nitrogen out of the ground reducing leaf production and increase fruiting?

Saltcayman

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #86 on: August 06, 2014, 07:31:58 PM »
I believe the groundcover is planted to attract pollinators and in some cases will fix nitrogen in the ground ie. legumes. I would think it would be best to keep it away from the trunk by a few inches at least to prevent root rot.

forumfool

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #87 on: August 06, 2014, 10:30:46 PM »

If I had more energy and more money, I might do the 3 ft bar earth/mulch.


Have you tried calling a tree trimmer/Craigslist? I get free trimmings from those guys (the usually have to pay a dump fee, and are more than happy to give to you instead). It's a nice mix of green/brown too....

jbaqai

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #88 on: August 09, 2014, 12:26:49 AM »

Lastly bsbullie should quit dogging your posts. My all encompassing advice is not free. You owe me ten twenty thirty PC fruits next year and for getting bsbullie-Rob off your back.


Finally someone point this out

I was trying to raise it for so long , but as a newbee was not feeling justified to be the person to raise the concern here

It was to the point that it was feeling that I better not say anything about zills mango, otherwise will get the same treatment

Sorry if I mis-judge the situation here , and definitely doesn't have background here , so apologies in advance

Mr. Clean

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #89 on: January 31, 2015, 09:08:39 PM »
This is my Pina Colada on 1-31-2015.  Sadly, I predict it will have less than five harvestable fruit, which means it will probably be top worked.

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JF

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #90 on: January 31, 2015, 09:12:13 PM »
This is my Pina Colada on 1-31-2015.  Sadly, I predict it will have less than five harvestable fruit, which means it will probably be top worked.




Hey Mr.Clean welcome back!! won't be long before the slapdog gets all over your derriere LOL

bsbullie

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #91 on: February 01, 2015, 12:10:36 AM »
Might as well just cut all your mangoes down now and plant pine trees.
- Rob

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #92 on: February 01, 2015, 12:06:59 PM »
JF:  Thank you for the well wishes.   :)
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gnappi

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #93 on: February 02, 2015, 06:49:07 AM »
Might as well just cut all your mangoes down now and plant pine trees.

:-) So supportive!
Regards,

   Gary

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #94 on: February 02, 2015, 06:52:41 AM »
This is my Pina Colada on 1-31-2015.  Sadly, I predict it will have less than five harvestable fruit, which means it will probably be top worked.

WOW! with a bloom like that you predict such low harvest? Damn, my Julie seedling had 1/20 th of that last year and I had enough for two legged squirrels to find and steal :-)
Regards,

   Gary

zands

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #95 on: February 02, 2015, 07:40:16 AM »
This is my Pina Colada on 1-31-2015.  Sadly, I predict it will have less than five harvestable fruit, which means it will probably be top worked.

WOW! with a bloom like that you predict such low harvest? Damn, my Julie seedling had 1/20 th of that last year and I had enough for two legged squirrels to find and steal :-)

My PC had profuse blooming in 2013 and 2014. My total haul was 2 bad tasting fruits in 2013. I have good blooming this year with BB size fruits forming so I think I will get something good this year.

I think profuse blooming and then getting nothing is a sign that the tree will soon be giving big yields. Might be the next year or the year after. Carrie was like this for me and IIRC Kent was too.
So a mango tree has a great bloom and no fruiting? I think its a matter of the hormones and similar in the tree just not lining up right for fruit production... You have to wait for this||||||
That the hormones and biology can be right for blooming but not for fruiting

bsbullie

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #96 on: February 02, 2015, 07:45:18 AM »
Again, more "biology" and physiology jabber woke.  I can show you a number of trees that bloom profusely year after year but set little to no fruit set.
- Rob

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #97 on: February 02, 2015, 08:09:16 AM »
A mango tree can full bloom all it wants, but if it's percentage of inherant perfect flowers is very low, you get little to very little fruit set- much less fruit that can reach maturity. No amount of pollination boosters can correct this.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)
F*ck squirrels
and deers

zands

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #98 on: February 02, 2015, 08:54:15 AM »
A mango tree can full bloom all it wants, but if it's percentage of inherant perfect flowers is very low, you get little to very little fruit set- much less fruit that can reach maturity. No amount of pollination boosters can correct this.

So then the tree does not produce perfect flowers until it is ready. Until it matures more to get 100% out the juvenile stage. So blooming is one thing BUT blooming and getting enough perfect flowers is another
« Last Edit: February 02, 2015, 10:16:52 AM by zands »

jc

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #99 on: February 02, 2015, 08:56:45 AM »
Gary Mango is a perfect example. Very low percentage of perfect flowers coupled with poor fungal resistance = few fruit.

A mango tree can full bloom all it wants, but if it's percentage of inherant perfect flowers is very low, you get little to very little fruit set- much less fruit that can reach maturity. No amount of pollination boosters can correct this.
JC

 

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