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Author Topic: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree  (Read 26065 times)

bsbullie

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #100 on: February 02, 2015, 10:10:47 AM »
Gary Mango is a perfect example. Very low percentage of perfect flowers coupled with poor fungal resistance = few fruit.

A mango tree can full bloom all it wants, but if it's percentage of inherant perfect flowers is very low, you get little to very little fruit set- much less fruit that can reach maturity. No amount of pollination boosters can correct this.

Yes, the Gary is inheritantly one and not just on isolated trees.  I also do not believe this is an issue with trees not producing perfect flowers year afetr year, especially on 20+ year old trees that are 25+ feet tall.  The trees load themselves with blooms year afetr year but except in isolated years, set and hold little, very little, amounts of fruit.
- Rob

ClayMango

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #101 on: February 02, 2015, 01:52:35 PM »
Again, more "biology" and physiology jabber woke.  I can show you a number of trees that bloom profusely year after year but set little to no fruit set.

Bullie without taking growth habbits, production issues, health into consideration... How to rank the Pina Colada in terms of flavor??...screw the small mango and big seed factored into there.
Thinking about joining a Fruitaholics anonymous support group...Fruit addiction has taken over my life!

bsbullie

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #102 on: February 02, 2015, 02:00:02 PM »
Again, more "biology" and physiology jabber woke.  I can show you a number of trees that bloom profusely year after year but set little to no fruit set.

Bullie without taking growth habbits, production issues, health into consideration... How to rank the Pina Colada in terms of flavor??...screw the small mango and big seed factored into there.

It can be very good if left to ripen to the proper stage prior to harvest.  Would I rank it in the tops, don't think so.  Texture is very soft.  Picked to early, it is very chalky and will not have the proper flavor profile it should have.  If space is limited and a factor, I would think hard about planting one.  If space is more on the unlimited side, then stick one in the ground.

As for small mango and big seed, I am also not in the boat.  Its all about the quality first.  Sweet Tart is smaller in size with an obnoxious seed but I will highly recommend it because of its flavor.  I would rather eat two amazing mangoes than one average mango just based on flesh to seed ratio.
- Rob

Mark in Texas

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #103 on: September 06, 2015, 09:45:39 AM »
I would be very interested in seeing a picture of a productive Pina Colada mango tree.

Then you need to hit up Zands.  He just PM'd me a copy of one and it is beautiful and very dwarf which interests me.

Mr. Clean

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #104 on: September 06, 2015, 10:13:14 PM »
My Pina Colada tree had a full bloom and bore one (1) fruit.  It was unevenly ripened.  I cut off two main branches and am topworking the tree into a more productive variety.
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110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

simon_grow

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #105 on: June 17, 2018, 07:02:41 PM »
I just wanted to update this old thread with a picture from Zands Pina Colada tree in case anyone read this thread several years and decided not to plant a tree. See reply #1
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=28467.msg323145#msg323145

Iíve heard other people mentioning it but it appears some Pina Colada trees may have been grafted on some sort of dwarfing rootstock? Perhaps this delays fruiting? Anyways, Zands tree shows a productive Pina Colada tree although it took it a while to start producing.

It would be great to hear from others growing this tree if their PC trees eventually became productive. If so, about how long?

Simon

PurpleAlligator

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #106 on: June 18, 2018, 06:25:02 AM »
My four year old tree produced about 10 small fruit this year.

Cookie Monster

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #107 on: June 18, 2018, 11:27:47 AM »
My tree looks like zands' -- ie, it's loaded with fruit.
Jeff  :-)

simon_grow

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #108 on: June 18, 2018, 03:12:01 PM »
Thanks for the replies, looks like patience with this variety will pay off. Now to go graft up a few trees.

Simon

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Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« Reply #109 on: June 18, 2018, 04:36:26 PM »
Patience is key!
Jeff  :-)

 

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