Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Asimina Trilobas in the wild  (Read 15170 times)

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #25 on: August 26, 2014, 07:36:49 AM »
Here is another area. Enjoy :)



















Life is good

Triloba Tracker

  • Pawpaw Crazy Person
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 761
  • Rom. 1:20
    • USA, Middle Tennessee, Zone 7a
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #26 on: August 26, 2014, 07:04:40 PM »
Thanks for the pictures, Bob! I think you've outdone me in your efforts and energy invested in finding wild pawpaws!

Too bad you are back in FL. I am planning to check out my "secret patch" as soon as I can. Last year I wasn't able to find ripe fruit until I believe early October (whether due to 'possums devouring them or ....?). They were the size of small mangos.

Jus crazy bout dem pawpaws!

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #27 on: August 26, 2014, 09:34:59 PM »
Good to hear from you Anthony! The coons and possums are quite effective at fruit removal. There were many trees that had the fruit removed by the time I came back to enjoy them. One tree in particular that I found in Lincoln county, with exceptionally large fruit, was completely clean when I came back. Also there is new competition, I saw an armadillo in Fayetteville! Armadillos in Tennessee!!??
Life is good

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2014, 03:42:02 AM »
This small scenic creek was hiding some Trilobas as well.











Life is good

Coconut

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 986
  • Boca Raton Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2014, 08:04:25 AM »
Look like snakehead fishing territory, when are you going to bred a paw paw for the sub tropic so Appalachian like me can feel a little of Home in South Florida? :)
The Biggest Fart in the Old West! 68 confirmed killed🔫💀

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2014, 12:33:56 PM »
Jack, it would be nice to find a suitable breed. I am planning on hitting the woods in south Georgia/ north Florida to find some wild Trilobas for seed to begin the process and have a friend who has a Triloba flowering in zone 9b but it has  not set fruit yet. I have brought some trees with me to Florida to see how they handle it here. I am hopeful about one from Tifton Georgia, but time will tell. I am also letting some grow here to speed up the process from seed to fruit and then they will get a truck ride back to Tn. I also have some seedlings started here in Fl. I know it sounds crazy but what is an enthusiast to do!
Life is good

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #31 on: August 27, 2014, 06:14:51 PM »
I was roaming around in middle Tennessee and found a tree just off a river. I gave it a shake and these fell out.



I cut this open on the spot


After a day of ripening further

I have read descriptions that compare these fruits to banana, but I found this particular fruit to taste like a banana pudding with a hint of vanilla.  It wasn't as complex as the first fruits on this post but did have a very good flavor.


Life is good

Coconut

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 986
  • Boca Raton Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #32 on: August 27, 2014, 07:48:07 PM »
Jack, it would be nice to find a suitable breed. I am planning on hitting the woods in south Georgia/ north Florida to find some wild Trilobas for seed to begin the process and have a friend who has a Triloba flowering in zone 9b but it has  not set fruit yet. I have brought some trees with me to Florida to see how they handle it here. I am hopeful about one from Tifton Georgia, but time will tell. I am also letting some grow here to speed up the process from seed to fruit and then they will get a truck ride back to Tn. I also have some seedlings started here in Fl. I know it sounds crazy but what is an enthusiast to do!

I am glad to see some one with passion like you for paw paw; I scrounge the world for a. Squamosa & its derivatives to develop my passion of trial & tribulation border on the eccentric & stupidity; in the end it paid off.  Your compassion for our native fruit give me great hope that finally it will be brought to light how wonderful this All American Native Fruit  Cherish by my Choctaw Ancestors will be free of its mississippian woodland obscurity.  The Great Spirit will guide you in your quest as we cheer you on to your excellent discovery & creating something Magical! Maybe I should plant some in Royal Palm. ;D
The Biggest Fart in the Old West! 68 confirmed killed🔫💀

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1954
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #33 on: August 27, 2014, 09:36:17 PM »
Mr. Eric Duckworth fruited several Pawpaw trees every year in San Mateo--- southwest of Saint Augustine and east of Palatka.
His Pawpaws were all growing in partial shade from very tall trees.  I visited him several times back in the 90's.  I don't know if he is still living--- he was in his 80's then.
Har

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #34 on: August 28, 2014, 12:26:06 AM »
Thank you for the info Har!
Life is good

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #35 on: September 25, 2014, 12:19:18 PM »
It is interesting how big some leaves can be.



Life is good

FlyingFoxFruits

  • Prince of Plinia
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • www.FlyingFoxFruits.com
    • USA, FEMA Region IV, FL Zone 9a
    • View Profile
    • Flying Fox Fruits
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #36 on: September 25, 2014, 04:53:15 PM »
wow, that tree in the second pic is pretty!!!

i notice the leaf size changes with my annonas, depending on time of year, (when they flower, the leaves get smaller), also of course more sunlight makes for a smaller leaf.

and of course there are always varieties that have larger leaves.
www.FlyingFoxFruits.com

www.PLINIAS.com

www.youtube.com/FlyingFoxFruits

I disabled the forum's personal messaging system, please send an email to contact me, FlyingFoxFruits@gmail.com

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #37 on: September 25, 2014, 07:30:39 PM »
Adam, both pics are the same tree. I have so many more pics to post of Trilobas. I have just been so busy that I have neglected this thread!
Life is good

Triloba Tracker

  • Pawpaw Crazy Person
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 761
  • Rom. 1:20
    • USA, Middle Tennessee, Zone 7a
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #38 on: September 25, 2014, 10:46:40 PM »
Bob, you didn't miss much at the secret pawpaw patch I mentioned to you off the Natchez Trace. I went over the weekend and only found three fruits. Last year there were many more. Fortunately one of the fruits was very ripe on the tree and was ready to eat right away. It had a wonderful aroma and the best flavor of any wild pawpaw I've tasted. Bubblegum/cherimoya is what came to mind.
One other fruit ripened well on my counter and was equally good. No "gamey" taste like in others I've had.
I put some of it in some kombucha I was bottling. We'll see how that tastes.
I also did not get sick from eating these like I have before. Not sure if because it was a small amount or because I was careful to avoid the seed "casing" which has off-flavors and which I suspected of leading to my nausea before.

On a positive note, we discovered quite a populous patch on my parents' property in Clarksville. Only a hundred paces from their back door, we found several trees and even a few fruit. They were able to eat them and seemed impressed!
Jus crazy bout dem pawpaws!

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #39 on: September 26, 2014, 08:15:38 AM »
Bubble gum and cherimoya sounds like a very good flavor combo. I will have to check out that area one day and see for myself. I have been looking around Florida for Asiminas but am less familiar with the terrain and they seem even more elusive down here.
Life is good

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #40 on: January 13, 2015, 12:45:08 AM »
Here are some pics from August. This small tree had some fruits.





Triloba tree extending over the creek, with fruits also.







Life is good

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #41 on: January 13, 2015, 01:00:31 AM »
I looked over a few spots and was surprised to see some trilobas pushing buds. I didn't think there would be any action until spring.





Life is good

jabotica

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
    • U.S.A.-N.of Okeechobee,Florida-zone 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #42 on: January 13, 2015, 05:25:18 PM »
I was in Clarksville Tn on Thanksgiven. Visited Dunbar Cave State Natural Area.
The park has a list of the trees,which includes Asimina Triloba All I found was Osage Orange
I will check it out In the summer

FlyingFoxFruits

  • Prince of Plinia
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12125
  • www.FlyingFoxFruits.com
    • USA, FEMA Region IV, FL Zone 9a
    • View Profile
    • Flying Fox Fruits
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #43 on: January 13, 2015, 05:56:14 PM »
i planted a pair of poor man's banana by a wet area in my yard....they seem happy so far...i can see the new growth wants to bust out.



www.FlyingFoxFruits.com

www.PLINIAS.com

www.youtube.com/FlyingFoxFruits

I disabled the forum's personal messaging system, please send an email to contact me, FlyingFoxFruits@gmail.com

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2015, 03:07:09 PM »
Here is another area where trees are pushing buds.
 

My glove is at the bottom of the tree for scale.


Life is good

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #45 on: January 18, 2015, 03:36:50 PM »
And another.






The same tree in December and this past June.




It is interesting to see an annona that can take the weather.
Life is good

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #46 on: March 26, 2015, 12:36:00 PM »
To all the members in the eastern portion of the US and Canada, get out there and find those pawpaws! This would be a good time to start looking for those flowering trees. If you have some creeks or rivers near you there are probably some pawpaws waiting to be found. Take pics and do some pollinating yourself!
« Last Edit: March 26, 2015, 12:39:23 PM by Bob407 »
Life is good

Triloba Tracker

  • Pawpaw Crazy Person
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 761
  • Rom. 1:20
    • USA, Middle Tennessee, Zone 7a
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #47 on: March 31, 2015, 01:14:13 PM »
I went on a hunt yesterday and came away totally stoked.

Prior to last fall, the only pawpaw trees i'd managed to find were in far-flung or hard to access areas. Then on a hike in our county park (5 min drive from here) last fall, I found a few pawpaws.

Yesterday I went back to the park to check on flowers. The trees I had previously found did have buds that were not quite or barely opening.

But the bigger news is I found a shuge "patch" of trees (or is it ONE tree?!? LOL) on a southwest-facing slope of a hill. Most of the trees were small and had no flower buds, but as I kept walking down the slope, I found some much more mature trees that were pretty well loaded with flowers. These were at the edge of the woods, where there is a clearing. These get lots more sun so are much happier.

Finally I have a good supply of very accessible wild pawpaws! I will be checking every few days. I may have to come back here and/or PM some experts when it comes to trying to pollinate them.
Jus crazy bout dem pawpaws!

Bob407

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
    • Isla de Bieke, PR 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #48 on: March 31, 2015, 02:33:12 PM »
Excellent! Keep us posted and pictures are a must!  Being that close to your house take us through the season with pictures, please! You could purchase a small tub of chicken livers and spread those around the area to attract flies for pollination.
Life is good

Triloba Tracker

  • Pawpaw Crazy Person
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 761
  • Rom. 1:20
    • USA, Middle Tennessee, Zone 7a
    • View Profile
Re: Asimina Trilobas in the wild
« Reply #49 on: March 31, 2015, 05:38:55 PM »
Excellent! Keep us posted and pictures are a must!  Being that close to your house take us through the season with pictures, please! You could purchase a small tub of chicken livers and spread those around the area to attract flies for pollination.

Will do...I tried to take a few yesterday but the iPhone wasn't cooperating (can't focus on close objects GRRR).

Secretly collecting and depositing roadkill beneath the trees did actually cross my mind...chicken livers would be a lot easier, since all I have to put stuff in is the family minivan  ;D
Jus crazy bout dem pawpaws!

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers