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Author Topic: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?  (Read 4852 times)

simon_grow

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Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« on: February 21, 2015, 11:41:43 AM »
Hello everyone,

I have an Imam Passand graft that took and is currently flowering. I did a search on the forum but couldn't really find any info other than that Squam is growing and evaluating it. Does anyone have any info on growth, productivity, taste when grown in the USA?

I did find some interesting read by Googling:

http://m.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/a-king-among-mangoes/article6040843.ece/
http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2009-05-22/news/27663492_1_mangoes-alphonso-varieties

Several articles from India seem to suggest it is a highly regarded mango.
Simon

dongeorgio

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2015, 11:48:32 AM »
I have this on my mango cheat sheet that I put together:


CAVEAT:  I put the cheat sheet together early in my mango career so the sources could be any website or book out there mixed with this forum.  I can't stand behind how accurate any of this info is.  That being said, Sheehan raved about this so I have 2 of them.




trailing growth habit and is easily controlled of 8 to 10 ft disease resistant - silky flesh, deep, sweet flavor with citrus overtones


[/size]‘Imam Pasand’ is one of the best mangos of India, ideally suited for dessert, the table and show. The fruit weigh 16 oz or more and are a beautiful smooth oval at maturity. The skin is a dark green, with distinct white highlights over the entire surface. Upon ripening the fruit can attain a deep yellow blush the shoulders and mid-section. The tree has a trailing growth habit and is easily controlled by annual pruning. The properly pruned tree will have a full, spreading canopy of 8 to 10 ft in height and spread. During the fruiting season of June and July, ‘Imam Pasand’ hangs heavy with consistent production. The fruit should be harvested mature green and ripened off the tree at a temperature of 75° to 85° F. Harvesting should occur 2 to 4 weeks before ripening on the tree for the development of the best quality. Properly harvested and ripened fruit have a fiberless, silky flesh with a deep, sweet flavor and distinct citrus overtones. The tree and fruit are tolerant of diseases and require little in the way of special care.
[/size]

George
Parkland - South Florida

simon_grow

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2015, 11:52:02 AM »
I also found this viewer that shows lots of different Indian varieties:
http://photogallery.indiatimes.com/news/events/mango-season-is-back/articleshow/19736820.cms

Simon

TnTrobbie

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2015, 12:16:15 PM »
I have a young growing tree inground and currently flowering. Mines a slow grower and internodal distances seem optimum for compact and bushy growing/ training. Pannicles seems resistance to PM and Anthrac in my yard as well thus far.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)
F*ck squirrels
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simon_grow

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2015, 01:21:55 PM »
Here is a picture of my graft that has pushed one small set of leaves and has a small pannicle on it now. It is a very low graft and is shaded so it will probably grow very slowly.



Simon

JF

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2015, 02:02:37 PM »
Here an article Behl send me:





On Wednesday, February 18, 2015, Info (Behl) <I> wrote:



Mangoes are the obvious luxury of summer
Vikram Doctor, ET Bureau May 22, 2009, 08.12am IST

Mangoes are the obvious luxury of summer – so obvious, I almost gave them a miss. Besides I didn't want to get into the inevitable argument about which variety is best. Usually I am happy to debate the merits of different food varieties, but with mangoes I feel it's pointless.

Dasheharis, Langras, Neelams, etc. are all fine mangoes, but the Alphonso is so superior that I no longer bother even debating the issue. If people don't want to eat Alphonsos, that's fine because it just leaves more for those of us who do.


It's true that of late some interesting new varieties have been coming on the market, mostly developed at agricultural research centres. Some are not bad, like the Mallika, a cross between the Dashehari and Neelam, that is big, smooth and sweet, though a little too much like a papaya in taste.

A very good papaya certainly, but I don't eat mangoes to taste papaya. None, for me, have seriously challenged the Alphonso, except for one so different from the Alphonso, and yet so good, that comparisons are really pointless.

This is the Imam Pasand, a mango that sounds like it should come from the Nawabi culture of the North, but in fact is from the deep South. Unlike other recently available varieties it wasn't developed at a research centre, but unlike most of the older varieties , its origin is not entirely obscure either. It comes from Tiruchirapalli (Trichy) where it is said to have been developed by the family that owns the Thathachariar gardens, a once sprawling estate at Srirangam, the island on the Cauvery, where the city's famous Sri Ranganathaswamy temple is located.

How a mango with such a Muslim-sounding name came from such a Hindu identified place is a mystery. Some have argued that it more likely was developed in the erstwhile Nizam's kingdom, perhaps in Masulipatam in Andhra Pradesh, from where it was taken to Tiruchirapalli. Another argument points to Tiruchirapalli's own years of Muslim rule, after the Deccan sultans seized it from the Vijayanagar empire in 1565.

But further confusing matters is its alternate names of Himayuddin or Humayun Pasand, which suggest a Mughal origin. Whatever its origins, there's no doubting the Imam Pasand's quality. It is a large, not too attractive looking mango, mottled green that lightens to blotched yellow-green as it ripens.

It has a hard stone which you can hear rattle inside . The flesh is a light yellow that looks unripe, and in fact, when you first bite in, there's a sourness that makes you think you've made a mistake. But the flesh is ripely smooth, with little stringiness, and then you realise the sourness is really a citrusy tang that adds a zest to the sweetness that spills over your palate.

A friend's father who grew up near Tiruchirapalli tells me that he's heard the Imam Pasand was a cross between a Banganapalli and a Mulgoa. I don't know if this is scientifically accurate, but in taste terms it makes sense. It has the heft of a Banganapalli, the biggest mango of any quality, and its light yellow flesh, but where that tends towards sweet insipidity, with a chalky undertaste, a Mulgoa-like acid bite rescues it, adding lively interest.

Many mangoes are initially sweet, but are undone by aftertastes which can be harsh, rank, chalky or chemical (thanks to the turpentine that some varieties naturally contain). The true glory of Alphonsos , I think, is not their sweetness (others are sweeter) but their aroma and incredibly rich smoothness of its aftertaste.

Squam256

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2015, 06:32:37 PM »
I have a couple Imam Passand trees growing, and they are slow/low vigor trees for sure.

Jani

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2015, 02:03:32 PM »
Bought a sorry looking specimen last Fall that was full of scale and soot, also it clearly hadn't seen much direct sunlight in the last couple years.

It was in a 3-gallon pot (as were the other small number of Imam Pasands for sale). Although they were 3-gallons it appeared to me (just visually speaking) that these trees were there for a while, and were the height of what you may expect a 7-gallon to be. Mine stood about 6 feet tall with about 4 feet of that being its slender trunk but had a pretty nicely developed canopy and branch structure.

So I cleaned it up as best as I could, leaf by leaf with neem/soap etc, fertilized, mulched and applied some minors from time to time, freed up the tangled mess of roots, put it a bigger pot, and stuck it away in a less visited part of the yard between an oak and a wall, and kind of just forgot about it as I wasn't expecting much from it any time soon.

Actually, my plan was to wait til around now that our south Florida "winter" seems to be over to "pug" it to start it on its path hopefully towards a better shape.
To my surprise a couple days ago, the tree is now about to go into full bloom and I must say that though its shaping up to be an exceptional mango season in my yard with practically every thing else with heavy fruit set so far and all pushing lots of second blooms - this little scraggly Imam Pasand is actually the one I'm most excited about, likely because their seems to be so little info about it out there especially for U.S. growers.

So going with the theme of the thread, any first hand info out there about what to expect fruit-wise, especially under S.FL conditions?

Also, I've decided I'm going to let it fruit, to my un-expert and untrained eye, it seems big enough to hold a handful.

Assuming it does hold some fruit to maturity, should I still go ahead with my plans to "pug" it afterwards? Or will that be too much for the tree to handle after what hopefully and possibly will be a decent fruit set, but as it's just started blooming will likely be a late season harvest, with a shortened window of prime growing season late in the summer....  ?




Thanks,
always longing for a JA Julie

gunnar429

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2015, 02:20:53 PM »
Bought a sorry looking specimen last Fall that was full of scale and soot, also it clearly hadn't seen much direct sunlight in the last couple years.

It was in a 3-gallon pot (as were the other small number of Imam Pasands for sale). Although they were 3-gallons it appeared to me (just visually speaking) that these trees were there for a while, and were the height of what you may expect a 7-gallon to be. Mine stood about 6 feet tall with about 4 feet of that being its slender trunk but had a pretty nicely developed canopy and branch structure.

So I cleaned it up as best as I could, leaf by leaf with neem/soap etc, fertilized, mulched and applied some minors from time to time, freed up the tangled mess of roots, put it a bigger pot, and stuck it away in a less visited part of the yard between an oak and a wall, and kind of just forgot about it as I wasn't expecting much from it any time soon.

Actually, my plan was to wait til around now that our south Florida "winter" seems to be over to "pug" it to start it on its path hopefully towards a better shape.
To my surprise a couple days ago, the tree is now about to go into full bloom and I must say that though its shaping up to be an exceptional mango season in my yard with practically every thing else with heavy fruit set so far and all pushing lots of second blooms - this little scraggly Imam Pasand is actually the one I'm most excited about, likely because their seems to be so little info about it out there especially for U.S. growers.

So going with the theme of the thread, any first hand info out there about what to expect fruit-wise, especially under S.FL conditions?

Also, I've decided I'm going to let it fruit, to my un-expert and untrained eye, it seems big enough to hold a handful.

Assuming it does hold some fruit to maturity, should I still go ahead with my plans to "pug" it afterwards? Or will that be too much for the tree to handle after what hopefully and possibly will be a decent fruit set, but as it's just started blooming will likely be a late season harvest, with a shortened window of prime growing season late in the summer....  ?




Thanks,

did you ever get a chance to taste the imam pasand?
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

JF

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2015, 04:29:50 PM »
Imam Passand is a very slow grower in Socal don't grow it on Turpentine. Tasted the fruit this summer along with Ratol  wasn't impress but love  Anwar Ratol.  Will  be propagating it this coming summer. Pix of imam multi-grafted with dupuis saigon, Ivory and Edward


« Last Edit: November 10, 2015, 04:56:49 PM by JF »

ibliz

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2015, 10:12:36 PM »
I have this on my mango cheat sheet that I put together:


CAVEAT:  I put the cheat sheet together early in my mango career so the sources could be any website or book out there mixed with this forum.  I can't stand behind how accurate any of this info is.  That being said, Sheehan raved about this so I have 2 of them.




trailing growth habit and is easily controlled of 8 to 10 ft disease resistant - silky flesh, deep, sweet flavor with citrus overtones


[/size]‘Imam Pasand’ is one of the best mangos of India, ideally suited for dessert, the table and show. The fruit weigh 16 oz or more and are a beautiful smooth oval at maturity. The skin is a dark green, with distinct white highlights over the entire surface. Upon ripening the fruit can attain a deep yellow blush the shoulders and mid-section. The tree has a trailing growth habit and is easily controlled by annual pruning. The properly pruned tree will have a full, spreading canopy of 8 to 10 ft in height and spread. During the fruiting season of June and July, ‘Imam Pasand’ hangs heavy with consistent production. The fruit should be harvested mature green and ripened off the tree at a temperature of 75° to 85° F. Harvesting should occur 2 to 4 weeks before ripening on the tree for the development of the best quality. Properly harvested and ripened fruit have a fiberless, silky flesh with a deep, sweet flavor and distinct citrus overtones. The tree and fruit are tolerant of diseases and require little in the way of special care.
[/size]

 "Harvesting should occur 2 to 4 weeks before ripening on the tree for the development of the best quality."

From what I read, most Indian mango have to to be picked at mature green stage. I am assuming 2-4 weeks before ripening the fruit would  still be green ? So how would one know when it is ready to be picked. Is there some kind of a tell tale sign or do they keep a  record of the date of the fruitset?   

HMHausman

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2015, 10:16:44 PM »
Strong flavored mango.  At my house so far, it has not been very productive.  It blooms nicely but hasn't many fruits.  I haven't sprayed copper or sulphur so I don't know if that would help.  The fruits, the few that did form, seem susceptible to fungus and splitting.
Harry
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simon_grow

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2015, 10:47:23 PM »
Is Imam Passand sweet? I like strong flavored mangos as long as they are sweet. Thanks,

Simon

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2015, 07:48:30 AM »
Hey Simon,

I got a couple bird pecked early harvested mangos off my tree to try..about 6 were maturing nicely until the blue Jays ripped into them.. hard to get a true sense of the taste as they were picked maybe 3 weeks early due to the birds and the holes they left.. the light color of the flesh was interesting and even though immature and damaged it had an interesting flavor...hopefully this season I can get a proper taste ...and will be going out of my way to protect the fruit on this tree this time...
always longing for a JA Julie

simon_grow

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2015, 08:13:50 AM »
Thanks for the report Jani. Hopefully you will be able to taste some fully ripened fruit next year.

Simon

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2015, 08:15:05 AM »
Yes....they have sweetness in their complex flavoring.
Harry
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simon_grow

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Re: Any info on Imam Passand Mango?
« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2015, 08:51:28 AM »
Thanks Harry,

That's all I wanted to hear. Now to see if it will sweeten up in my yard. I hope Imam Passand performs better than Alphonso.

Simon

 

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