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Author Topic: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...  (Read 6135 times)

bsbullie

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #25 on: February 26, 2015, 11:38:19 AM »
I grow all the species I mentioned, in zone 7, in pots. The plants I suggested to you, but the Ylang ylang, are not ultra tropical nor are they fruits, these are often grown by new gardener's interested in tropical flowers, because getting a plant to flower is less involved to get it to flower then fruit.

The Kamya will grow in ground with protection in my area.  I know that Angel Trumpet grows in the 8-11 zone, but even in my 7 zone there's a hardy variety that can withstand low temperatures. I suggest you try that out if you're worried, Stormin. Basically, If you can grow Mangoes, which it seems you've committed to, then you should be able to grow my suggestions.
The Angel Trumpet, Kamya, and Plumeria can be grown in ground in zone 9 with protection. I've seen it. The Ylang ylang, I'd put in a pot or enclosed structure. My plant is inside where it's by a draft, 60 degrees or so during the day and lower at night, and it's still growing. :)

Right, you are a zone pusher growing in pots.  Most people in Florida are not growing in pots or don't know your recommendations are based on your pot culture.  Pot culture in colder zones also slows the growth tremendously.  It can even stunt or prohibit the growth.  The Ylang Ylang gets huge, so keeping it in a pot is more than a challange.

Mangoes in 9b can be a challange, and can even have detrimantal results due to weather.  It is very common to have frost, freezez and even a hard freeze in 9b.  Are there microclimates, yes but people need to know the truth, not an opinion of a zone 7 "grower". 

Maybe you should update your profile, as has been requested (and should be required) by the mods and members, to show your zone.  That way when you state "you are growing it", they know to take it with a grain of salt and ask questions or do some research before wasting time, effort and money.

Also, if you think I am making the information up I posted, do a little research and let me know what you find.
- Rob

Tropicaliste

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #26 on: February 26, 2015, 12:53:48 PM »
Stormin: Despite what naysayers may tell you, the flowers I suggested are growable. I'm not the first, nor the last, to grow these successfully. Of course, it's up to you, these were just suggestions, that I think your mom would love. I've done my research and know that it can be done. You already know growing mangoes will be a challenge, but by applying your knowledge to these other tropicals you can easily bask in the bounty. The Kamya can easily grow in the ground with no protection in your area. The Plumeria and Angel Trumpet will need some protection, but I've seen these flourish in the ground in zone 9 and the Plumeria especially was covered in flowers.

The Ylang ylang will need to go into a large pot, and protected in the Winter, but it's not as dainty and weak as some may have you believe. If you feel up to the challenge, then go for it. No plant is a breeze for any grower, there may be freak weather, or water restrictions that occur, but unless you live in the rain forest, then we're all trying our best. Best wishes to you garden and feel free to PM or email me if you have any more questions. :)

bsbullie

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #27 on: February 26, 2015, 01:39:48 PM »
Stormin: Despite what naysayers may tell you, the flowers I suggested are growable. I'm not the first, nor the last, to grow these successfully. Of course, it's up to you, these were just suggestions, that I think your mom would love. I've done my research and know that it can be done. You already know growing mangoes will be a challenge, but by applying your knowledge to these other tropicals you can easily bask in the bounty. The Kamya can easily grow in the ground with no protection in your area. The Plumeria and Angel Trumpet will need some protection, but I've seen these flourish in the ground in zone 9 and the Plumeria especially was covered in flowers.

The Ylang ylang will need to go into a large pot, and protected in the Winter, but it's not as dainty and weak as some may have you believe. If you feel up to the challenge, then go for it. No plant is a breeze for any grower, there may be freak weather, or water restrictions that occur, but unless you live in the rain forest, then we're all trying our best. Best wishes to you garden and feel free to PM or email me if you have any more questions. :)

You are right, what was I thinking.  Your Zone 7 experience of growing in pots far exceeds the experience and knowedge I will ever have...
- Rob

Bob407

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2015, 03:54:11 PM »
I have grown plumerias in zone 9 and they can make it to about 8' tall and survive and flower until there is the occasional cold snap but they come back. Angel trumpets grow quite well in zone 9 and there are many trees around 10' tall that do well even through the cold. If you know where to look you can find some very large mango trees in zone 9. I have a pic of a mango tree that must be at least 35' tall and has a trunk that is around 3' or 4' feet. I have to find the pic to post , if I don't find it I will swing by and take another pic and post it soon.
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bsbullie

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2015, 04:04:47 PM »
Right, and as I said there are microclimates but it is not the norm.  Ask Nancy. a resident in 9b, how her trees have fared over the years.  It is truly not worth it, everyone go ahead and recklessly ant anything you want no matter what the zone irrigation...
- Rob

Bob407

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #30 on: February 26, 2015, 04:30:21 PM »
Rob, I do not know Nancy. However I do know others in the same zone with positive experiences. It seems as if you are going against your own advice to others regarding mangos, " give them time to establish themselves and be patient". I do not think it is necessarily reckless, that seems a bit extreme to say. I enjoy the surprises that occur by attempting to grow plants outside there native range and I am sure others do too. I respect your advice and experience, but your experience does have its limit and so does mine. Every attempt is a new opportunity. I have had many surprise and many failures, I have learned from them both.
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GrassFlats

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #31 on: February 26, 2015, 05:41:23 PM »
There are some mango trees in Altamonte springs that are 20' plus in height and have given a lot of fruit over the years

jbaqai

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #32 on: February 26, 2015, 05:50:24 PM »
I am in north cali 9b
Out of 4 years of growing mango , I end up killing them 3 years straight , mostly through my ignorance

This year is the only year with zero casualties , and it may be due to fact of mild winter , strong plants (to begin with) , or gain of knowledge though forums like this one

So yeah I agree , it's tricky , but doable

Rob has a point here, I can see my plants do really good in summer months , but really struggled in winter , that may effect the overall health of the plant

jbaqai

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2015, 05:52:33 PM »
Going back to the main topic of the this thread

Called the nursery , and they don't ship to Cali   :(


Want to buy some more plants , buts my fav wild papaya is not responding to my request , may be they are still close for the season

bsbullie

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #34 on: February 26, 2015, 05:57:54 PM »
Rob, I do not know Nancy. However I do know others in the same zone with positive experiences. It seems as if you are going against your own advice to others regarding mangos, " give them time to establish themselves and be patient". I do not think it is necessarily reckless, that seems a bit extreme to say. I enjoy the surprises that occur by attempting to grow plants outside there native range and I am sure others do too. I respect your advice and experience, but your experience does have its limit and so does mine. Every attempt is a new opportunity. I have had many surprise and many failures, I have learned from them both.


I am not saying people cant or shouldnt try.  What I am saying is that some on here are completely new and ZERO knowledge or understanding what they are getting into and what it takes once they do.  For a lack of a better term, a newbie comes here and loves the thought of growing a mango, goes and buys one or five of them based on "recommendations" from others (others with and without direct experience).  They don't understand that just cause they buy and plant the trees, it is not as simple to plant and watch it grow into a producing tree with no efforts.  Not all zones afford the same luxury.  Not all people understand what it takes and how to protect the trees in certain cold spells.  Whats worse, many learn the hard way, after it is too late. 

What I am saying is not directed at any one person here, it even happens at nurseries.  A nursery in Central or Northern Florida will sell a tree to someone without explaining to them what it takes to grow it, the care to give it and the risks involved.  There are areas south of Orlando that have the same issues, the climate in some areas around Lake O that will support mangoes however there are some areas that are just too cold for someone not wishing to cover, heat, build a shelter, etc. just keep th etree alive, or at least the part above the graft alive.

Yes, I preach patience but it is for those who want a 3 gal or 7 gal to produce fruit in one to two years and when it doesnt, claim the tree is crap and not worth a damn.  Those people should not be growing mangoes or any other fruit trees.  Those people should plant a pine tree or oak tree and be done with it.

Meet Nancy, aka Puglvr1 (you can also do a search on this site, or google, to see her trials and tribulations over the years).

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=14472.0

Another from Zone 9b

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=14486.0
- Rob

michsu

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #35 on: February 26, 2015, 06:07:38 PM »
yeah, all my trees are turning to crap right now because of the winter .. I'm going to sit here and forget about them for at least a month.. I hope they have fruit by then.. actually, I think some will  ;D
 one to two years is way too long to wait.. if one tree won't have fruit, then I'm just going to walk over to my other one and get it. Planting the trees are just a hobby for everyone, and many learn because of successes or failures (so next time they won't or will do the same thing to get better); basically, this is all a learning experience for everyone here; It is good to also have very knowledgeable people like yourself to help us out when we do; Not all of us has the space or climate to grow things, but we just want to try; You won't know until you try, right?  ;D You are right though in that they should buy one or two trees first to test it out, and if everything is good after a few years, then just add more of the same kind (like mangoes perhaps).. That's also what I'm doing with my yard too.. have a little of everything.. if something dies, I see what happens and try not to do it next time, or just get another thing.. For example, I have been trying to grow abius here in CA (4 died so far because of freezing, but I try different areas of the yard).. I still have one alive, but it is very small (about 1 gallon).. it's not going anywhere, just slowly getting more leaves.. hey, it's all about growing more stuff, and that's the fun of it.. failures and successes.. I even tried durian and rambutan too, but I'm not touching those until I get a greenhouse next time haha..
« Last Edit: February 26, 2015, 06:27:56 PM by michsu »

Bob407

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #36 on: February 26, 2015, 06:33:42 PM »
Thanks for your reply Rob. I appreciate your intense passion for tropical fruits. Here is a pic of the mango tree I previously mentioned in zone 9. This thing is a machine.
 
That is a pecan tree to the right of the mango.



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GrassFlats

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #37 on: February 26, 2015, 07:17:11 PM »
Yes, i can see how growing mangos in 9b can be difficult with the freezes and all.  However, if you plant the right varieties that can be kept under 10 feet and still be productive then it may be worth it to some.  I agree, it can be a pain in the ass to cover the trees when it gets cold, especially when the trees are bigger.  Growing some in pots is an option as well and when they get too big then plant them in the ground, leave them be, or cont to try to bring them indoors when it gets cold.  i hope to get a few mangoes from my 7 gallon Pickering this year.  The tree is exploding with flowers and has some fruits on it.  I will thin them out with time as i know it is not good to try and harvest a bunch of mangoes on such a small tree

bsbullie

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Re: Went to a nursery with the intent of getting two mango trees...
« Reply #38 on: February 26, 2015, 08:08:59 PM »
Part of my case and point, do you realize how difficult it is to keep a maturing or mature mango tree at 10 feet (except for maybe a Julie).  Its not like you just hat rack it to keep it at that height. Yes, you can watch the Richard Campbell videos but you she keep in mi d, his skill and knowledge is far beyond the average homeowner or forum member.
- Rob

 

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