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Author Topic: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango  (Read 8934 times)

Squam256

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Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« on: January 15, 2012, 12:55:22 AM »
After the night of temps in the 30s we had here in SFL the other week, I observed some minor cold damage on some of my tropical stuff (Spanish Lime, Custard Apple, Coffee). My mangoes had appeared largely  unscathed except for 2 very small trees (an Alphonso and a Pim Sen Mun) that had some leaf damage.

However, upon further observation I noticed that my Coconut Cream trees were exhibiting some cold damage. One actually looks like every leaf got affected. At first I though this might have to do with the location of the row maybe being in a colder micro -climate, but none of the other cultivars in close proximity were showing any signs of cold stress. Also double checked the irrigation to make sure the drips were working for those trees.

Then when I was going through some of my nursery potted trees, I discovered that a potted Coconut Cream tree was showing signs of cold stress on the leaves as well. Not as noticeable as the in-ground trees but visable on closer inspection. It was in a group of other mangoes (Cogshall and Fairchild trees) as well as other tropicals, none of which showed any symptoms of being affected by the cold other than some potted bananas.

Overall, just one observation and the sample size is admittedly small. But it could be something to look for from this cultivar in the future.

Anyone else growing Coconut Cream in areas that experienced temps in the 30s?
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 12:57:25 AM by Squam256 »

pj1881 (Patrick)

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2012, 12:58:48 AM »
I have a few three gallon trees that saw 38-39 last week, I will check tommorow morning! Good to see you here man!

Tropicalgrower89

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2012, 01:17:24 AM »
My forecast low temp last week was 36 degrees. It was also windy. Most of the leaves of my soursop fell-off, and some of the leaves of my mamey got slightly burnt.  All of my mangoes were untouched, including the coconut cream mango. That same evening, before the temps fell, I had the sprinklers on for an hour.
Alexi

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2012, 09:20:30 AM »
We got down to 39 degrees in Coral Springs and my Coconut Cream in a 15 gal pot shows no damage.
   
FloridaGreenMan

Squam256

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2012, 03:50:06 PM »
I have a few three gallon trees that saw 38-39 last week, I will check tommorow morning! Good to see you here man!

Thanks Pete Patrick (*edit*), glad to be here.

I'm not sure what the low was on my property but I thought that the recorded low for Lox Groves was something like 36. May have been colder than that in pockets. 
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 04:13:26 PM by pj1881 »

Cookie Monster

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2012, 06:20:50 PM »
The damage was from the dry, cold wind and the strong cloudless sun that followed the morning after. Even though we only got to about 40F, I also had leaf damage to several of my mango trees. However, out of the couple hundred or so potted mango trees I have here, the only ones that showed a pattern of damage were the 3 and 7 gallon nam doc mai #4 trees.  The other cultivars were hit and miss (eg, 1 lancetilla out of several, 1 pina colada out of several, etc) despite being located in close proximity to one another. None of my couple dozen potted coconut cream trees showed any signs of damage.

One of the most important things is to do in these cold, windy events is to water the hack out of your younger/potted trees just before and right after. The dry wind really beats them up. Zill's HPP had heavy damage to a row of in ground mango trees when they got down to 32F last year because they hadn't been watered well enough. It looked like someone walked through with a flamethrower on just that one row.

Jeff
Jeff  :-)

Squam256

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2012, 09:15:10 PM »
I have a few three gallon trees that saw 38-39 last week, I will check tommorow morning! Good to see you here man!

Thanks Pete Patrick (*edit*), glad to be here.


Wow, how THAT one got by me I have no idea.  ???.

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pj1881 (Patrick)

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2012, 09:22:58 PM »
I have a parts vendor at my truck shop in Accounts that calls me "Dan".  Everytime I call the guy I say "This is Patrick" he says "How can I help you Dan"... Have you been attending the Rare Fruit Council Meetings at Mounts?

Squam256

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2012, 09:33:23 PM »
I have a parts vendor at my truck shop in Accounts that calls me "Dan".  Everytime I call the guy I say "This is Patrick" he says "How can I help you Dan"... Have you been attending the Rare Fruit Council Meetings at Mounts?

Haha....yes I've been at all the meetings. I also go to the Broward RFC and been at most of those.

lycheeluva

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2012, 08:35:12 PM »
i often read about florida farmers turning their sprinklers on when they are expecting a cold snap but i never see an explanation for how watering a plants gives some protection from the cold. can you explain?

Cookie Monster

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2012, 10:03:00 PM »
Water freezes at 32F and is an exothermic process (heat is released). So if you can keep the freezing process going, you can keep the temperature of the plant you're trying to protect right around 32F, even though ambient air temp may be quite a bit lower. You might get some tender limb damage, but the tree itself will survive.

Water also has a high specific heat capacity - needs to release a lot of heat energy in order to cool down relative to air. So, where I'm at, I water the heck out of my trees (rootballs only) so that over the night, the water retains a small amount of heat - possibly enough to raise the temp a couple of degrees near the trunk. It also obviously helps with desiccation as a result of the dry wind that usually accompanies the cold snaps.

Jeff
Jeff  :-)

lycheeluva

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2012, 11:12:22 PM »
thanks Jeff

Cythompson159@yahoo.com

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2018, 07:04:52 AM »
Thanks for the info. I have just experienced the same issue here in central Florida. We had 2 rare cold fronts come thru this year. Both getting close to 32 degrees. Since I live close to the waterways we rarely ever freeze. I covered all of my tropical trees for the first one and saw no damage at all including a different mango tree (lemon zest), avacado tree, citrus, guava,lychee and lemon and lime. The 2nd cold front I did not cover any of them. Only the coconut cream has damage and looks quite bad. 75% of the leaves have damage and are turning brown. The tree has a nice 2" diameter trunk and is 3 to 4 years old. Can u tell me how your tree(s) responded after the cold damage? And if ok, did they flower and produce well in the spring? And if anyone could tell me if I should prune back on all of the branches that have the leaf damage once spring starts to show on the tree?

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2018, 12:23:10 PM »
I have a inground CC (3gal) at 9B. We saw 29oF on the 2nd night of the cold weather early this January and the CC got fried. Time will tell if all of them are still alive (some 32+ mango trees). Peach Cobler however took it like a champ. 3-4 minor leaf patchy discoloration for a bushy 6ft tree. Its flowering right now actually. Not one leaf lost. No microclimate going on their either. 1 gal rows of coconuts 20ft to the east...crispy. Rows of mangoes 16ft south..crispy. Rows 16ft north....crispy.
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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2018, 12:28:39 PM »
Leave the crispy trees untouched for now. See if the warmer weather in spring rejuvenates them back to life. Only then you'll know what needs to be replaced. The "scrape test" (to see if it's green underneath) can be misleading in cases like these.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)
F*ck squirrels
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sidney

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2018, 02:42:58 PM »
I planted a Coconut Cream in September from a 3 gallon pot and before the cold got here on the Treasure Coast it had grown to 5 feet, it rained here just before the cold weather hit so I had little time to cover things. I hastily hammered a long metal stake near it and covered it with a brown tarp and held down the edges with bricks. I also heavily mulched roots with straw. So far all is well, just a few burned edges from the tarp. It is not yet blooming but  others older different varieties are blooming now.

mangomongo

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2018, 01:30:37 PM »


 
Coconut cream at a friend's house in downtown Orlando looks like it's a gonner.

WGphil

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2018, 06:26:37 PM »
I cut back Lisa’s CC yesterday and cut about half off.   A smaller tree might not have made it. Others hit hard was the fruit punch. 

On the other hand my juicy peach looks flawless even though trees planted at same time around it all have leaf and/or twig damage.



« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 06:54:25 PM by WGphil »

Cythompson159@yahoo.com

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2018, 07:15:09 PM »
Wow, my cc mango tree looks identical to that one. Hope it is not "fried"

mangomongo

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2018, 09:36:38 PM »

Just over the river on the island island we didn't see much damage at all despite a temp recorded as low as 31 for less than an hour onbth e coldest day.

gozp

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Re: Possible cold sensitivity of the Coconut Cream mango
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2018, 11:34:26 PM »
Coldest temp we experienced dec of 2017 located in SoCal
No damage.




 

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