Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mangosteen grafting  (Read 5162 times)

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5042
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Mangosteen grafting
« on: June 02, 2012, 03:53:56 AM »







Mangosteen grafting is becoming more common for farms so trees fruit faster and have greater early vigour.Compatability is unpredictable with some rootstock/scion combinations causing adventitious rootstock shooting and scions not developing.Other combinations show booming scion development.Above is a successful graft and mangosteen rootstock seedlings.

Jackfruitwhisperer69

  • Into Fruits, Orchids, Herbs and Veggies!!!
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2287
  • Zone 11b
    • Madeira Island, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2012, 08:14:55 AM »
Mike,

The mangosteens looks very slick 8).

Grafted mangosteens will definitely produce way earlier that seedling trees. is it worth planting grafted mangosteens?...I have read that grafted mangosteens must be staked to promote proper growth in their early years and some times fruit size is also reduced.

Thanks for sharing :)
Steven Silva

The endless journey of life and it's pleasures.

murahilin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2347
    • USA Greenacres, Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2012, 08:37:11 AM »
Mangosteen grafting is becoming more common for farms so trees fruit faster and have greater early vigour.Compatability is unpredictable with some rootstock/scion combinations causing adventitious rootstock shooting and scions not developing.Other combinations show booming scion development.Above is a successful graft and mangosteen rootstock seedlings.

Is there only a certain part of the tree that mangosteen scions should be harvested from? In Puerto Rico, the mangosteens that were grafted were generally stunted and under 5ft tall after 12 years while the seedlings were pretty tall and producing well. This was not an isolated case but around maybe 100 or so trees.

Also with mangosteen, I've read that the tree has to read a certain mass before it will fruit regularly. Does the same hold true for grafted trees? I've seen grafted trees around 1-2 ft tall with a few fruit but I don't know if they will produce regularly and continue to grow at a normal pace or does the growth become stunted once the grafted tree begins to fruit?

TropicalFruitHunters

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 808
    • USA, Columbus, OH, xxxxx Zone 5b
    • View Profile
    • Tropical Fruit Hunters
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2012, 08:52:57 AM »
While grafted plants are always a hit...I believe it has been proven over time that grafted mangosteens are more the oddity than a benefit for orchard farmers.  As Sheehan stated, they may produce much earlier but often very few fruit since the trees just do not attain much size at all.  Seedling plants quickly outrun and outfruit grafted plants.

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5042
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2012, 08:57:12 AM »
Grafting mangosteens successfully is pretty common in thailand and the correct rootstock/scion can mean the initial ass dragging can be passed through quickly.Bad combinations can result in lankiness,multiple below graft shooting and slow growth but good compatabilty means an improvement in all growth,productivity and juvenile period characters.My large leafed type grafts nicely onto common type rootstock but borneos never seem to do well on common rootstock.I have seen tiny thai ones with fruit and they dont seem to have the same size threshold thing going on as durian.I suspect the Puerto Rico trial and other one off trials were done without the benefit of thai expertise.I understand that trees grow normally but never get to be 70 foot giants like seedlings can be.

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5042
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2012, 08:25:14 PM »

This is the conventional wisdom on grafting mangosteen but it fails to take the Thai experience into account or look at recent success in grafting.
Conventional vegetative propagation of the mangosteen is difficult. Various methods of grafting have failed. Cuttings and air-layers, with or without growth-promoting chemicals, usually fail to root or result in deformed, short-lived plants. Inarching on different rootstocks has appeared promising at first but later incompatibility has been evident with all except G. xanthochymus Hook. f. (G tinctoria Dunn.) or G. lateriflora Bl., now commonly employed in the Philippines.


Mangosteen can be successfully grafted onto rootstocks of Garcinia venulosa, G. xanthochymus and G. hombroniana (mangosteen grafting).


Although mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) is one of the most delicious tropical fruits, large scale planting of this crop has not occurred, due to slow growth and a long juvenile phase. Mangosteen trees require 8 - 15 years to begin flowering. The vegetative method of propagation using top-grafting can shorten the flowering age to 5 years. However, it takes 2-3 year to grow the rootstock and the growth of grafted mangosteen is poor. The slow growth rate of the mangosteen tree is due to the absence of root hairs and poor branching of the root system, thereby restricting water absorption and nutrient uptake. To improve the root system of mangosteen and enhance growth a nurse stock plant technique has been developed. Giving an additional nurse stock plant to the mangosteen seedling provides the tree with a double root system. Nurse stock plants of G. dulcis and G. fructicosa on non-grafted seedlings enhanced seedling growth as much as twice compared to seedlings without a nurse stock plant. Other experiments using mangosteen as the nurse stock plant of three types of mangosteen seedlings (non-grafted, grafted with juvenile scion, grafted with mature scion) showed that seedlings with a nurse stock plant, especially non-grafted plants and those grafted with juvenile scion, grew better than seedlings without a nurse stock plant. The growth of non-grafted seedlings was better than grafted seedlings. Seedlings grafted with mature scion showed the poorest growth.


Center for Tropical Fruit Studies of Bogor Agricultural University has been developing several approaches to improve existing trees and technology package to establish mangosteen orchard, which consists of (a) introducing new mangosteen clone ‘Wanayasa’, (b) improvement rooting system using mycorhyza and Agrobacterium rhyzogenes, (c) enhancement of tree growth using double-rootstock system, (d) cropping system, (e) irrigation and fertilization system, (f) trees husbandry, and (g) harvest and post-harvest technology. We are also conducting several researches on genetics variability identification and development, studies on cause of gamboges and methods to overcome the gamboges problem on fruits, developing non-destructive technology for detection of gamboges, and improving technique for prolonging shelf-life of fruits

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11250
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2012, 10:07:17 PM »


Is there only a certain part of the tree that mangosteen scions should be harvested from? In Puerto Rico, the mangosteens that were grafted were generally stunted and under 5ft tall after 12 years while the seedlings were pretty tall and producing well. This was not an isolated case but around maybe 100 or so trees.

Also with mangosteen, I've read that the tree has to read a certain mass before it will fruit regularly. Does the same hold true for grafted trees? I've seen grafted trees around 1-2 ft tall with a few fruit but I don't know if they will produce regularly and continue to grow at a normal pace or does the growth become stunted once the grafted tree begins to fruit?

Yes, you should pick mangosteen scion materials that are upright in growth manner. If you pick a scion that is growing horizontally and graft that the mangosteen scion will continue to grow horizontally.
I think Mike T is correct. The Thais, and maybe other Asian countries, have perfected mangosteen grafting. I think the proper techniques are just not well known in the west yet. Unfortunately a lot of the research results are published in Thai language and completely unaccesible to most of us.
Oscar

murahilin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2347
    • USA Greenacres, Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2012, 11:44:04 PM »
Yes, you should pick mangosteen scion materials that are upright in growth manner. If you pick a scion that is growing horizontally and graft that the mangosteen scion will continue to grow horizontally.
I think Mike T is correct. The Thais, and maybe other Asian countries, have perfected mangosteen grafting. I think the proper techniques are just not well known in the west yet. Unfortunately a lot of the research results are published in Thai language and completely unaccesible to most of us.

Thanks for that info Oscar. Are your mangosteen trees grafted or seedlings? If you have both, have you noticed any difference in growth between them?

I think the grafted mangosteen trees in PR were bought from Malaysia and not Thailand so maybe they have not learned the proper way to graft them in Malaysia. Well, that was probably 12 years ago that they were grafted so maybe by now they've learned.


fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11250
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2012, 03:17:45 AM »
Yes, you should pick mangosteen scion materials that are upright in growth manner. If you pick a scion that is growing horizontally and graft that the mangosteen scion will continue to grow horizontally.
I think Mike T is correct. The Thais, and maybe other Asian countries, have perfected mangosteen grafting. I think the proper techniques are just not well known in the west yet. Unfortunately a lot of the research results are published in Thai language and completely unaccesible to most of us.

Thanks for that info Oscar. Are your mangosteen trees grafted or seedlings? If you have both, have you noticed any difference in growth between them?

I think the grafted mangosteen trees in PR were bought from Malaysia and not Thailand so maybe they have not learned the proper way to graft them in Malaysia. Well, that was probably 12 years ago that they were grafted so maybe by now they've learned.

Hi Sheehan, my mangosteen trees are all seedlings. All the other nurseries here also only produce seedling trees. I pondered this question for a long time about seedling versus grafted mangosteen. There is a lot of debate still over this issue. After seeing grafted trees fruiting in pots in Chantaburri experimental station in Thailand i became convinced that grafted trees can produce younger and smaller. Unfortunately i was never able to find out what rootstock they were using or exact technique. I think Dr. Salakpetch is the one to ask. She was the one in charge of those trials.
Oscar

TropicalFruitHunters

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 808
    • USA, Columbus, OH, xxxxx Zone 5b
    • View Profile
    • Tropical Fruit Hunters
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2012, 07:50:54 AM »
A lot of that write-up sounds like it came directly from Bernie Dizon's website.  Dizon in the Philippines has been doing the nurse stock or multiple rootstock grafting for ages and seems to have huge successes with it.  His website shows that they have better results grafting mangosteen onto mangosteen.  Using one of the other garcinias with better rooting systems as a nurse stock sounds interesting.  His website has changed and there is no longer links to the many articles covering these efforts.

The grafted plants I've seen in Thailand or have received here from Thailand all seem to have been grafted onto mangosteen rootstock.

Bryan Brunner, in PR, experimented with mangosteen grafting onto g. xanthochymus and g. hombroniana.  In several instances, the mangosteen scion outgrew the rootstock resulting in plants that could not support the weight.  The scion's trunks were at least 2-3 times the size of the rootstock after several years of growth.  It was very odd.

Here are some insights on Dizon and multiple rootstock grafting from Joe Real...many of us are familiar with Joe and his grafting prowess.

I knew that site and I personally know the site owner.

Bernie Dizon is cool. He has received many achievement awards in the field of tropical fruit trees. He promotes multiple rootstock. I have also suggested to Bernie Dizon to use rootstocks that are non-siblings. Apparently, they have used any compatible rootstock they can get hold of and do multiple of them.

I mentioned my theory of how using non-sibling rootstocks can enhance survival and vigor based on scientific research published for the sibling and non-sibling plants grown in containers. We have this proof to that theory and another one that came well before that, which is the Parent Washington Navel tree which is composed of three kinds of non-sibling rootstocks.

If you ever go to the Philippines, you have to visit Bernie Dizon. His nursery is located next to my high school alma mater, Philippine Science High School in Diliman, Quezon City.

Bernie Dizon, Verman Reyes and other Philippine Rare Fruit Growers are actively using the yahoo group forum. Kind of not-user friendly unlike the forum we have here, but it is great for disconnected users who seldom have direct or troublesome internet connections. so the email type forum works in such country where the web based type of forum is unreliable. So you know why the site has not been as active. Not a lot of users can get connected online for long periods of time.


The following was posted many years ago on a Philippine Ag Site...author unknown:

I've been doing some research for the last 3 years on this Multiple Rootstock Technology which was popularized by Mr. Bernie Dizon. Here some facts regarding this practice and you'll will be surprised this practice is not new and was just re-branded to make it like a new practice or technology or lets just say it is a new propagation variation which is great propagation technique or style.

First of all the other terms used by other fruit growers on multiple rootstock:

1. Tripod Method
2. Double Rootstock
3. Triple Rootstock and so on like Quadruple Rootstock so forth
4. Octopus Method
5. Prolific Method

Scientific terms related to Multiple Rootstock:

1. Inarching
2. Bridge Grafting
3. Nurse Grafting
4. Repair Grafting
5. Interstock Grafting

History:

Well, Multiple Rootstock if you're going to search it in the agricultural books or in the internet, you'll have limited topics on it except ofcourse from the website of Mr. Bernie Dizon which popularized it in the Philippines.

The reason for this limited search is because the term is not accepted by the scientific world. Its is a new brand of a hybrid propagation technique.

So, why is this a hybrid technique? Because it is a propagation technique which entails combination of propagation techniques for fruit trees. To be able to make a multiple rootstock fruit tree; first, you will be needing a single graft fruit tree then a rootstock or seedling of a same species then inarch it with the grafted fruit tree. You can also make a faster double rootstock tree by cleft grafting a large scion unto 2 rootstock that is equal to the large scion.

Does international countries use multiple rootstock:

Answer is yes, they do but not as termed multiple rootstock. Some of the terms they use with relation of multiple rootstock are interstock grafting, repair grafting, nursre grafting etc...

In the USA, repair grafting is used when a fruit tree like an apple or citrus is already hit by a disease in the roots and is given another rootstock to aid the main branch. This is in connection with Mr. Bernie Dizon's book that was saying an american has used the multiple rootstock technique in his apple trees.

Nurse grafting is mostly used for marcotted fruit trees like Lychee, Longan etc... to also aid on the sturdiness of the fruit trees root system. As we all know, marcotted fruit trees have a weak root system because it was air-layered, a form propagation technique. By adding another rootstock with a marcotted fruit tree, you are making the tree sturdy from the soil and making it more productive.

But to sum it all up, Multiple rootstock is an old age technique practiced by nature itself from the survival instinct of trees. Trees tend to have a natural instinct on bridge grafting another root unto the branch when the tree is damaged.

I do consider that multiple rootstock is a hybrid propagation technique because it is a combination of 2 or more propagation technique.

Thailand has used multiple rootstock on there Durian trees because of Phytoptora disease. Multiple rootstock is mostly used if you're going to notice it is from root problems of fruit trees. Another use of multiple rootstock is for propagation purposes, because of flushing of multiple rootstock, propagators tend to have more scions for grafting.

Tropicdude

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1699
    • Dominican Republic, Zone 13B.
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2012, 02:35:25 PM »
Research has shown that rootstock that has been inoculated with beneficial mycorrhizal fungi have a higher success rate.

I was thinking about this while reading through  this thread on how difficult it is to graft mangosteen, it seems logical that one of the reasons is the poor root structure of mangosteen.

The report posted earlier of innarching a G. xanthochymus by Mike-T makes complete sense, in that article it explains success by using a dual rootstock,  also at Dizons site it also mentions using the dual rootstocks technique.

Now this is just an idea, but, if  you can innarch a mangosteen before  grafting, I believe you will have more success.

Now getting back to mycorrhizal fungi,  one has to expect that in Thailand the soil used is teaming with symbiotic bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi. 

I went searching to see if i could find any possible research done on this, and came across this report;

Mangosteen (Garcinia delicious fruits of Malaysia and has great potential for commercial development. However, the long juvenile period resulting from the extremely slow growth of the seedlings renders itself an unattractive propcsition for cultivation on a large scale. Accelerating the growth rate of mangosteen seedlings is therefore an important prerequisite for the extensive commercialisation of this crop. Poorly developed root system characterised by unbranched, coarse and lack of laterals strongly correlated to the slow growth. Such root characteristics offer great opportunity for colonisation by arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM). The main objective of this study is therefore, to promote seedling growth through symbiotic associations between AM fungi and mangosteen roots. Results of inoculation studies have shO'Ml that mangosteen seedlings responded to AM infection with more than 60% of the total root length being infected. Introduced AM fungi caused tremendous improvements in the plant growth. Total dry biomass was 40%-64% and net assimilation rate was 30%- 40% higher than the uninoculated seedlings. AM inoculated plants also had 20%-40% more leaves that give 35%-65% greater leaf area compared to the uninoculated seedlings. Stomatal resistance, transpiration rates and chlorophyll content were also Significantly improved by mycorrhizal infection. Improvements in plant growth were primarily due to greater uptake of immobile nutrients, particularly phosphorus (P), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Phosphorus, Zn and Cu uptakes by mycorrhizal plants were 67%-88%, 50%-93% and 53%-59% greater than the uninoculated plants, respectively. Colonisation Significantly induced greater root length density (RLD), root branching density (RBD) and number of root tips with RLD, RBD and number of root tips of AM plants ranged 58%-87%, 20%-30% and 22%-25% respectively greater compared to the uninoculated seedlings. Mycorrhizal rnangosteens were also more tolerant to water stress. They CQuid maintain higher stomatal conductance and photosynthesis at lower moisture status suggesting lower leaf water potentials at which stomata closes. Such ability indicates a more efficient stomatal regulation by AM plants

I think the key here is to get the rootstock vigorous enough to take a graft, whether it be by inoculating the roots, inarching, or a combination of both.

from Dizon's site:

Mangosteen                                                                                                                                
                                        to Bear Fruits      Initial Fruiting          Commercial Fruiting          Habits

        Seedling                    10 feet               10 years            15 years and above    Biennial
        Double rootstock    10 feet                6 years            10 years and above    Prolific
        Grafted                    1 - 3 feet          1 - 2 years             15 years and above    Biennial
        Double rootstock    1 - 3 feet                1 - 2 years             8 years and above             Prolific

mangosteen manual:
http://www.google.com.do/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=10&ved=0CGMQFjAJ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cropsforthefuture.org%2Fpublication%2FMonographs%2FMangosteen%2520monograph.pdf&ei=Z-HxT_mcKYaU6wHtz_CIBg&usg=AFQjCNHJDmV_Oz4d5Dpm1yR7Arz__fsMhA&sig2=bgT1Hs1_-LEftiWkwxMrlQ

An Agronomist in the DR, told me he had good success getting his trees to start fruiting, using this fertizer http://www.swissgrow.com/product_bioforte.html I noticed that the only thing special in it is proteins,  in the above manual it is mentioned that yeast is used on seedlings which helps them grow better.  so there must be something to all this, maybe the yeast/proteins help feed the beneficial fungi or help develop the roots some other way.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2012, 02:58:09 PM by Tropicdude »
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5042
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2012, 04:13:45 PM »
This was standard Malaysian practice over 20 years ago and they are way behind the Thais.More than possible, grafting and multi-rootstocks are advisable: Oh yeah great find tropicdude.



Technique of Saddle Grafting on Mangosteen: A well maintained five-month-old seedling with a height of 10-15cm is selected as rootstock. The seedling is then lopped-off at a height of 4cm and all the leaves are removed. Two cuts (about 1.5cm each) are made on opposite sides of the stem so as to form a tapering wedge (Figure 11).
 
A healthy terminal mangosteen shoot with two leaves (about 5cm) obtained from a matured tree is selected as scion. The two leaves on the scion are trimmed to reduce transpiration loss. A clean razor cut of about 1.5cm is then made on the base of scion (Figure 12). The prepared scion is then placed on top of the previously prepared rootstock making sure that at least one side of the cambium is aligned (Figure 13) and wrapped firmly with sealing film to ensure good contact (Figure 14).

The grafted plant is then covered with a plastic bag which helps to keep the humidity high (Figure 15). Prior to covering, the soil is adequately watered and plants carefully handled to avoid wetting the grafted parts. The plastic bag is subsequently removed when the scion starts shooting and this normally occurs about one month after grafting. Figure 16 shows a successfully saddle-grafted mangosteen plant with two new leaves.
 Sorry pictures didn't copy.

Tropicdude

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1699
    • Dominican Republic, Zone 13B.
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #12 on: July 04, 2012, 03:03:04 PM »
Additional information on this topic I have come across:

Source: The Archives of the rare fruit council of Australia

GRAFTING MANGOSTEENS

It is said that grafted Mangosteens only grow very slowly. Quite true. This happens when a purple mangosteen scion is cleft grafted onto a purple mangosteen seedling rootstock. The purple mangosteen is a very slow-growing rootstock, so why use it anyway? You want something with guts under the tree to force it to grow more vigorously and come into crop earlier.

Change the rootstock and grafting method and you might get somewhere. Instead, use the yellow mangosteen, Garcinia xanthochymus as the rootstock - as indicated by Popenoe on page 399.

The yellow mangosteen has plenty of vigour; see the tree in the Flecker Botanic Garden in Cairns. It grows like steam.

Instead of isolating the purple from its own rootsystem by cleft grafting, why not plant a purple and a yellow seedling side by side and approach-graft them together once their stems are thick enough. They make a good union, at least they have done in my garden, but they need to be left bound together for about 6 months or even longer as they seem slow to unite. Once a good union has formed, cut the top off the yellow rootstock leaving the purple variety on the two root systems.

I think the shot is to plant out a purple from a nursery, choose a vigorous plant. Raise a few yellow seedlings in pots but only plant out the most vigorous seedling and throw the rest away. Plant the yellow as close as possible to the purple to facilitate approach-grafting later on once their stems are thick enough.

I have two purples approach grafted to a yellow in the middle as in the picture. Now we'll see what happens!

Mangosteens respond well to frequent heavy watering. In fact, I reckon they would grow best actually IN water!


Link:
http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/CaringForTrees/BackyardGarden1-95.htm
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5042
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2012, 03:57:49 PM »
You should see the xanthochymus tree now.It is very big and there is fruit slurry under the tree.Supplementary rootstocks are supposed to work really well for many species allowing earlier fruiting,vigour and less frequent delayed rejection/incompatability problems.

Cultivator

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 230
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2012, 03:36:02 PM »
Lorem ipsum bung sai
« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 05:11:07 AM by Cultivator »

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5042
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #15 on: December 27, 2012, 03:48:17 PM »
Cultivator I don't think anyone has tried it but warreni and mestoni would be good candidates.

Jackfruitwhisperer69

  • Into Fruits, Orchids, Herbs and Veggies!!!
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2287
  • Zone 11b
    • Madeira Island, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2012, 03:59:14 PM »
Hi Cultivator and Mike,
I bet warenii and menstonii would make great ''slaves'' for mangosteen...just a simple approach graft to give mangostana the extra root system and seed up the growth. Cultivator ya just need to trial both and see which sp works well with mangostana. 
Steven Silva

The endless journey of life and it's pleasures.

Cultivator

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 230
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #17 on: December 27, 2012, 04:23:21 PM »
Lorem ipsum bung sai
« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 05:10:35 AM by Cultivator »

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5042
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #18 on: December 27, 2012, 07:51:58 PM »
The pic looks like warreni.Approach grafting keeping both rootstocks is sure worth trying as is standard approaches.Cleft grafting is worth trying but excess rootstock vigor may cause 'elephant footing'.The grafted ones in the pic were from Mission Beach friend and were not mine.

Jackfruitwhisperer69

  • Into Fruits, Orchids, Herbs and Veggies!!!
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2287
  • Zone 11b
    • Madeira Island, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2012, 07:10:06 AM »
Hi Cultivator,
Enjoyed seeing them pics 8) The Sour plum sure is a fast grower, indeed! Mangostana will definitely benefit from the union with warrenii...without a doubt 8) I agree with Mike...If rootstock is more vigorous...can cause an elephant foot. This also happens with pond apple, that is used as a rootstock for other annona sp. Since you have many native rootstocks lying around...try all methods of propagation and see what works. 8) I luv experiments...i bet you do too ;D

Keep us posted  :) Using native species as rootstocks is most clever...they are more adapted to your climate and will definitely thrive 8)

Steven Silva

The endless journey of life and it's pleasures.

adiel

  • Zone 10b Miami FL
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2012, 10:29:21 AM »
Gentlemen, how about using the Warreni as rootstock for the Borneo small leafed mangosteens?  ...Since its so hard to get seeds from these cold tolerant type of mangosteen (Borneo small leafed mangosteens), and also the fact that they might benefit from having a native rootstock?  ;)
Adiel

Cultivator

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 230
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2012, 03:35:26 PM »
Lorem ipsum bung sai
« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 05:11:23 AM by Cultivator »

adiel

  • Zone 10b Miami FL
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #22 on: December 31, 2012, 11:15:34 AM »
Cultivator, sounds like a good plan.  How is the weather there, does it get cold?  If it does, you might want to get your hands on some of the Borneo small leafed mangosteen budwood since it looks like it resists more cold weather.  Check out this thread:

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=3271
Adiel

Cultivator

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 230
    • View Profile
Re: Mangosteen grafting
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2012, 03:37:36 PM »
Lorem ipsum bung sai
« Last Edit: March 24, 2013, 05:11:40 AM by Cultivator »

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers