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Author Topic: Rootstocks and stuff  (Read 2382 times)

Tropicdude

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Rootstocks and stuff
« on: June 22, 2012, 03:17:00 PM »
In Florida it has been mentioned many times that "Turpentine" is the preferred rootstock.

In my continued research ( I often have a lot of time on hand ) into rootstock, and trials done on them.  I have come up with this information.

Gomera-1 is suspected of being turpentine.   ( further research has shown they are not the same )

Mangoes grafted on Gomera-1 are a bit more cold hardy, and can tolerate winds better, they will produce more fruit , but the fruit will have less weight compared to Gomera-3. Gomera-1 is also has shown better salt tolerance.

Gomera-3, has the advantage of producing bigger trees, and larger fruit.

In other research,  Olour and Muvandan have showed best results for Alphonso in terms of production and salt tolerance.

Vellaikolamban rootstock is dwarfing and recommended for high density planting. ( Something i was looking for ).

I am also a believer in using beneficial fungi etc on plants. so I also went looking for information on beneficial strains.

Gigaspora margarita is what you want to sprinkle on your roots or mango seeds, which will give you higher graft success and more productive trees, inoculating your rootstocks with G. margarita will cut the time needed before you can start grafting on them.

Anyway i am just throwing this information out there, in the hopes it may be its useful to someone
« Last Edit: June 22, 2012, 09:43:58 PM by Tropicdude »
William
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Mike T

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Re: Rootstocks and stuff
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2012, 05:38:15 PM »
The feral stringy or turpentine here is the most cold,salt,wind and drought tolerant variety here and it is also the largest mango tree type reaching massive proportions.It is the preferred rootstock for all cultivated types maximising quality and fruit size and I wonder how close it is to the Gomeras.

Tropicdude

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Re: Rootstocks and stuff
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2012, 09:42:23 PM »
The feral stringy or turpentine here is the most cold,salt,wind and drought tolerant variety here and it is also the largest mango tree type reaching massive proportions.It is the preferred rootstock for all cultivated types maximising quality and fruit size and I wonder how close it is to the Gomeras.


According to one report i read from the Canary Islands, they believed Gomera-1 is actually the turpentine from Florida. traits of which seem to be identical. but I found a more scientific report , and it seems turpentine and Gomera are not one and the same. http://www.ipmd.ir/Papers/molbreed.pdf


scientific results of different rootstocks
http://www.ulmer.de/artikel.dll/ejhs-22-05_MzM4NjU5.PDF
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Mr. Clean

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Re: Rootstocks and stuff
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2013, 04:47:52 PM »
Julia Morton said:

Dwarfing

Reduction in the size of mango trees would be a most desirable goal for the commercial and private planter. It would greatly assist harvesting and also would make it possible for the homeowner to maintain trees of different fruiting seasons in limited space.

In India, double-grafting has been found to dwarf mango trees and induce early fruiting. Naturally dwarf hybrids such as 'Julie' have been developed. The polyembryonic Indian cultivars, 'Olour' and 'Vellai Colamban', when used as rootstocks, have a dwarfing effect; so has the polyembryonic 'Sabre' in experiments in Israel and South Africa.

In Peru, the polyembryonic 'Manzo de Ica', is used as rootstock; in Colombia, 'Hilaza' and 'Puerco'. 'Kaew' is utilized in Thailand.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/mango_ars.html#Dwarfing

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Cookie Monster

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Re: Rootstocks and stuff
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2013, 10:23:32 PM »
I would probably take some of those dwarfing rootstock recommendations with a grain of salt. Gary Zill has spent the better part of the last 15 or so years experimenting with dwarfing rootstocks. From the various numbers scrawled on his trial plants, it looks like he's gone through well over 130 different types of rootstock. And, my understanding is that one rootstock may only dwarf a handful of cultivars.

If it was as easy as the authors claim, I'd suspect they would be widely used, as everyone from the orchard owner to the backyard grower wants trees that don't need to be heavily pruned every year.
Jeff  :-)

Mango_Seed

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Re: Rootstocks and stuff
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2019, 03:39:47 PM »

Mango_Seed

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Re: Rootstocks and stuff
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2019, 11:28:10 PM »
Is turpentine rootstock the most used variety in Florida & why? Just a lot of seeds laying around after lunch?

gychang

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Re: Rootstocks and stuff
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2019, 02:40:29 AM »
In Florida it has been mentioned many times that "Turpentine" is the preferred rootstock.

In my continued research ( I often have a lot of time on hand ) into rootstock, and trials done on them.  I have come up with this information.

Gomera-1 is suspected of being turpentine.   ( further research has shown they are not the same )

Mangoes grafted on Gomera-1 are a bit more cold hardy, and can tolerate winds better, they will produce more fruit , but the fruit will have less weight compared to Gomera-3. Gomera-1 is also has shown better salt tolerance.

Gomera-3, has the advantage of producing bigger trees, and larger fruit.

In other research,  Olour and Muvandan have showed best results for Alphonso in terms of production and salt tolerance.

Vellaikolamban rootstock is dwarfing and recommended for high density planting. ( Something i was looking for ).

I am also a believer in using beneficial fungi etc on plants. so I also went looking for information on beneficial strains.

Gigaspora margarita is what you want to sprinkle on your roots or mango seeds, which will give you higher graft success and more productive trees, inoculating your rootstocks with G. margarita will cut the time needed before you can start grafting on them.

Anyway i am just throwing this information out there, in the hopes it may be its useful to someone

Thanks for the info on the bacterium...  this is good info.  What did you end up finding out about root stock?  Does it matter much?  I found some papers from University of hawaii stating that it doesn't affect the rigor of the tree

https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/HITAHR_04-06-93_34-35.pdf


Future

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Dwarf Mango Rootstocks
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2019, 09:18:10 AM »
Julia Morton said:

Dwarfing

Reduction in the size of mango trees would be a most desirable goal for the commercial and private planter. It would greatly assist harvesting and also would make it possible for the homeowner to maintain trees of different fruiting seasons in limited space.

In India, double-grafting has been found to dwarf mango trees and induce early fruiting. Naturally dwarf hybrids such as 'Julie' have been developed. The polyembryonic Indian cultivars, 'Olour' and 'Vellai Colamban', when used as rootstocks, have a dwarfing effect; so has the polyembryonic 'Sabre' in experiments in Israel and South Africa.

In Peru, the polyembryonic 'Manzo de Ica', is used as rootstock; in Colombia, 'Hilaza' and 'Puerco'. 'Kaew' is utilized in Thailand.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/mango_ars.html#Dwarfing


Having seen Dr. Richard Campbell's current experiments with 3 dwarfing rootstocks got me interested.  He said one problem is the dwarf stock takes so long to grow (to be sizable enough to graft on to).  I noticed I have a Pickering seedling that is probably 4 years old and only 2 feet high.  This got me wondering about polyembryonic dwarfs - more likely to continue the dwarf trait - vs. using mono dwarfs.

Anyone grown out either mono or poly dwarfs or slow growers like Julie, Pickering from seed and noticed either lack of dwarf/slow growing habit or consistency?

Here is some info on Vellaikolamban
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328353904_Comparative_performance_of_mango_varieties_grafted_on_Vellaikolamban_and_mixed_rootstock

Separate forum thread includes dwarfing topic here: http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=20816.0

 

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