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Author Topic: A New Maha Chanok Convert  (Read 16060 times)

Zeeth

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #75 on: June 14, 2015, 08:49:11 AM »
Our Maha Chanok flowered and fruited for the 1st time this year. Its about 5 years old and 10 ft tall.
 Its loaded with about 70 fruit, and I had to support the branches. The 1st fruit came off 2 weeks ago with beautiful color and aroma, BUT the taste was bland and watered down. All the other fruit are still hard. Is the tree overworked ? Should I thin the herd a little next year if its loaded again? We,re in PBC Fl.

I've heard (but don't yet have experience with) that the first year of fruit is always the worst tasting, and it gets better as the years pass until it hits it's peak somewhere. This is second hand information though, so I don't yet have the experience to say that it's definitely true.

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #76 on: June 14, 2015, 09:21:23 AM »
Our Maha Chanok flowered and fruited for the 1st time this year. Its about 5 years old and 10 ft tall.
 Its loaded with about 70 fruit, and I had to support the branches. The 1st fruit came off 2 weeks ago with beautiful color and aroma, BUT the taste was bland and watered down. All the other fruit are still hard. Is the tree overworked ? Should I thin the herd a little next year if its loaded again? We,re in PBC Fl.

I've heard (but don't yet have experience with) that the first year of fruit is always the worst tasting, and it gets better as the years pass until it hits it's peak somewhere. This is second hand information though, so I don't yet have the experience to say that it's definitely true.

It varies. Half my mango trees gave me awful or sub-par fruit the first year....like kind of a transition year between no fruiting and full honest fruiting.
While the other half gave good representative mangoes the first year.

My first fruiting year for my Neelam I was amazed. It held 13 fruits. I ate one and it was so foul I tossed it and stripped off all the others so that the small tree could put out more branch-leaf growth. Leaving the fruits on tree would pull resources away from branch -leaf growth.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2015, 09:25:59 AM by zands »

Mangomaniac

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #77 on: June 14, 2015, 10:12:57 AM »
OK, thanks Zands, it has been an unusual year so far. My NDM also taste very bland this year. The Glenns and Carries were very good, but already most are off the tree! Still waiting on the LZ that produced for the 1st time this year (5). Hope they're better than the MC.

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #78 on: June 14, 2015, 01:30:53 PM »
Sometimes, this is true. Also, flavor varies from year to year. Some years mangoes x, y, and z are insanely delicious while mangoes a, b, and c are boring. Then the following year vice versa.

For example, the glenn this year have been better than usual for me, but the carrie has been off.

OK, thanks Zands, it has been an unusual year so far. My NDM also taste very bland this year. The Glenns and Carries were very good, but already most are off the tree! Still waiting on the LZ that produced for the 1st time this year (5). Hope they're better than the MC.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #79 on: June 15, 2015, 01:43:13 AM »
I think we're looking for those performance drugs in our mangos! Nothing gets disqualified.

Hasn't there always been a lot of mango varieties, Oscar? Of course, now we have Gary Zill and his breeding program.

Was an off joke due to fact i recently watched a movie about Lance Armstrong. What i really meant is that no mango can stay at the very top for long, just like no athlete can stay at top for long, just because now there is so much competition. (Very rare exceptions exist, like Serene Williams.)
Yes there have been lots of mango varieties for a long time. BTW mango grafting only started in 16th century. Before that all mangoes were grown in India from seed. It was the Portuguese in India, in state of Goa, that started the mango grafting craze. After that there were lots of new cultivars. But i don't think the number of new varieties every year was nearly as many as now.
Oscar

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #80 on: June 15, 2015, 09:09:21 AM »
There is a tendency when reading the reviews on this forum, to hold out for what folks say is the best tasting mango, so you can have the king in your yard.  Tasting these new flavor grenade varieties from Gary and a few others has changed my opinion.

Basically, in my experience at Harry's, Gary's presentation, and tasting at Walter's is that there are good mangoes and elite mangoes (queue the elitism whispers) :P   When one discovers a truly elite mango, it no longer matters whether it will win the day....they're so good that you realize you want that in your life.  Thus, great old varieties like Glenn, Haden, etc are no less appetizing than they always were, but no longer necessitate being planted out in one's yard IMO.  The idea isn't to make sure you have the king, but to make sure you have all kings planted out.  Having a yard with maha chanok, angie, lemon zest, coconut cream, sweet tart, fruit punch, and the like would make every summer that much better...no joke, these new mangoes are SO intense.

If one had a tasting of say the imaginary top 10 varieties on Earth, they would be impossible to rank.  How would you rank coconut cream against lemon zest?  Fruit punch against sweet tart.  Plus, one of the world's best mangoes would finish last, yet likely be better-tasting than what most ppl on Earth will be planting  :'(  So, for me, I am now going to tastings with the idea of getting to either 1.  try how good a variety I have tasted before is on that day/year/ripeness 2. Find out which mangoes don't make the cut, sort to determine which varieties are truly the best for my family's tastes and 3.  to get a general idea what a variety tastes like, even if I have no intentions of planting it out.  As previously stated in another thread, I had 3 mangoes yesterday (Fruit Punch, Seacrest, Sweet Tart) and 3 last week (PPK, Maha chanok, angie) that all got me to say:  "Wow, I think that's the best mango I have ever tasted!"  Can't even imagine trying to further sort them out---when they are all outstanding on their own.

~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

naturelover

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #81 on: June 15, 2015, 09:17:43 AM »
There is a tendency when reading the reviews on this forum, to hold out for what folks say is the best tasting mango, so you can have the king in your yard.  Tasting these new flavor grenade varieties from Gary and a few others has changed my opinion.

Basically, in my experience at Harry's, Gary's presentation, and tasting at Walter's is that there are good mangoes and elite mangoes (queue the elitism whispers) :P   When one discovers a truly elite mango, it no longer matters whether it will win the day....they're so good that you realize you want that in your life.  Thus, great old varieties like Glenn, Haden, etc are no less appetizing than they always were, but no longer necessitate being planted out in one's yard IMO.  The idea isn't to make sure you have the king, but to make sure you have all kings planted out.  Having a yard with maha chanok, angie, lemon zest, coconut cream, sweet tart, fruit punch, and the like would make every summer that much better...no joke, these new mangoes are SO intense.
If one had a tasting of say the imaginary top 10 varieties on Earth, they would be impossible to rank.  How would you rank coconut cream against lemon zest?  Fruit punch against sweet tart.  Plus, one of the world's best mangoes would finish last, yet likely be better-tasting than what most ppl on Earth will be planting  :'(  So, for me, I am now going to tastings with the idea of getting to either 1.  try how good a variety I have tasted before is on that day/year/ripeness 2. Find out which mangoes don't make the cut, sort to determine which varieties are truly the best for my family's tastes and 3.  to get a general idea what a variety tastes like, even if I have no intentions of planting it out.  As previously stated in another thread, I had 3 mangoes yesterday (Fruit Punch, Seacrest, Sweet Tart) and 3 last week (PPK, Maha chanok, angie) that all got me to say:  "Wow, I think that's the best mango I have ever tasted!"  Can't even imagine trying to further sort them out---when they are all outstanding on their own.

Now as far as Elite goes, I think newer sometimes isn't better but rather, on par ;  Baileys Marvel was superb this year, as good a LZ.  The one Cushman I had was amazing as well. Not to say that the newer Zill varieties aren't excellent, I sometimes think that people just favor the latest thing....   and of course, the tree itself matters to many ( size, disease resistance, growth habit, etc)


bsbullie

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #82 on: June 15, 2015, 10:13:10 AM »
There is a tendency when reading the reviews on this forum, to hold out for what folks say is the best tasting mango, so you can have the king in your yard.  Tasting these new flavor grenade varieties from Gary and a few others has changed my opinion.

Basically, in my experience at Harry's, Gary's presentation, and tasting at Walter's is that there are good mangoes and elite mangoes (queue the elitism whispers) :P   When one discovers a truly elite mango, it no longer matters whether it will win the day....they're so good that you realize you want that in your life.  Thus, great old varieties like Glenn, Haden, etc are no less appetizing than they always were, but no longer necessitate being planted out in one's yard IMO.  The idea isn't to make sure you have the king, but to make sure you have all kings planted out.  Having a yard with maha chanok, angie, lemon zest, coconut cream, sweet tart, fruit punch, and the like would make every summer that much better...no joke, these new mangoes are SO intense.
If one had a tasting of say the imaginary top 10 varieties on Earth, they would be impossible to rank.  How would you rank coconut cream against lemon zest?  Fruit punch against sweet tart.  Plus, one of the world's best mangoes would finish last, yet likely be better-tasting than what most ppl on Earth will be planting  :'(  So, for me, I am now going to tastings with the idea of getting to either 1.  try how good a variety I have tasted before is on that day/year/ripeness 2. Find out which mangoes don't make the cut, sort to determine which varieties are truly the best for my family's tastes and 3.  to get a general idea what a variety tastes like, even if I have no intentions of planting it out.  As previously stated in another thread, I had 3 mangoes yesterday (Fruit Punch, Seacrest, Sweet Tart) and 3 last week (PPK, Maha chanok, angie) that all got me to say:  "Wow, I think that's the best mango I have ever tasted!"  Can't even imagine trying to further sort them out---when they are all outstanding on their own.

Now as far as Elite goes, I think newer sometimes isn't better but rather, on par ;  Baileys Marvel was superb this year, as good a LZ.  The one Cushman I had was amazing as well. Not to say that the newer Zill varieties aren't excellent, I sometimes think that people just favor the latest thing....   and of course, the tree itself matters to many ( size, disease resistance, growth habit, etc)

That is very true.  I had someone say to me yesterday that Southern Blush is just an average run of the mill mango caus ethere are so many newer and better varieties out.  While some of the newer varieties may be exceptional, it does not and should not turn an very good "old variety" into an average mango.

As far as "top ____ list", I really like Cushman and it would tend to find a place in the upper tier in just about any tasting.  Baileys Marvey, never really liked it and I would group it with VP, Julie, Carrie and others that I am just not fond of.  Does that mean that is gospel across the board?  No, just one's opinion.  Everybody has to like what they like and not like something because someone else does.  If someone else says they like something else and you taste it and really like it, then that is fine and their choice. 

Bottom line, everyone should go with what they like and there is nothing wrong with that no matter what somebody else likes or says.
- Rob

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #83 on: June 15, 2015, 10:31:30 AM »
Funny you mention Southern Blush mangoes :). Spyke's Groves on Griffin Rd had loads of em in various stages of ripeness yesterday so I bought ~20lbs and tasted it for the first time. What a delicious mango. Extremely sweet with pineapple and sugar cane (o.O) tones to my taste buds. Not rich and complex like Maha but no more or less enjoyable.
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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #84 on: June 15, 2015, 10:32:35 AM »
There is a tendency when reading the reviews on this forum, to hold out for what folks say is the best tasting mango, so you can have the king in your yard.  Tasting these new flavor grenade varieties from Gary and a few others has changed my opinion.

Basically, in my experience at Harry's, Gary's presentation, and tasting at Walter's is that there are good mangoes and elite mangoes (queue the elitism whispers) :P   When one discovers a truly elite mango, it no longer matters whether it will win the day....they're so good that you realize you want that in your life.  Thus, great old varieties like Glenn, Haden, etc are no less appetizing than they always were, but no longer necessitate being planted out in one's yard IMO.  The idea isn't to make sure you have the king, but to make sure you have all kings planted out.  Having a yard with maha chanok, angie, lemon zest, coconut cream, sweet tart, fruit punch, and the like would make every summer that much better...no joke, these new mangoes are SO intense.
If one had a tasting of say the imaginary top 10 varieties on Earth, they would be impossible to rank.  How would you rank coconut cream against lemon zest?  Fruit punch against sweet tart.  Plus, one of the world's best mangoes would finish last, yet likely be better-tasting than what most ppl on Earth will be planting  :'(  So, for me, I am now going to tastings with the idea of getting to either 1.  try how good a variety I have tasted before is on that day/year/ripeness 2. Find out which mangoes don't make the cut, sort to determine which varieties are truly the best for my family's tastes and 3.  to get a general idea what a variety tastes like, even if I have no intentions of planting it out.  As previously stated in another thread, I had 3 mangoes yesterday (Fruit Punch, Seacrest, Sweet Tart) and 3 last week (PPK, Maha chanok, angie) that all got me to say:  "Wow, I think that's the best mango I have ever tasted!"  Can't even imagine trying to further sort them out---when they are all outstanding on their own.

Now as far as Elite goes, I think newer sometimes isn't better but rather, on par ;  Baileys Marvel was superb this year, as good a LZ.  The one Cushman I had was amazing as well. Not to say that the newer Zill varieties aren't excellent, I sometimes think that people just favor the latest thing....   and of course, the tree itself matters to many ( size, disease resistance, growth habit, etc)

That is very true.  I had someone say to me yesterday that Southern Blush is just an average run of the mill mango caus ethere are so many newer and better varieties out.  While some of the newer varieties may be exceptional, it does not and should not turn an very good "old variety" into an average mango.

As far as "top ____ list", I really like Cushman and it would tend to find a place in the upper tier in just about any tasting.  Baileys Marvey, never really liked it and I would group it with VP, Julie, Carrie and others that I am just not fond of.  Does that mean that is gospel across the board?  No, just one's opinion.  Everybody has to like what they like and not like something because someone else does.  If someone else says they like something else and you taste it and really like it, then that is fine and their choice. 

Bottom line, everyone should go with what they like and there is nothing wrong with that no matter what somebody else likes or says.
Agreed (hell, i planted bombay and PSM because I like them)....just make sure you get a good variety to try, maybe hit up fruit and spice park for some of the older varieties and make sure you hit up Walter's place for the new designer mangoes.  Once you've tried them, plant the trees that you like best.  I love Dot and Southern Blush, but it is hard to beat some of these newer mangoes...LZ, ST, FP, Seacrest, etc.  But, yeah, some of the oldies are still goodies...and to each his own.  I work with a lady who strongly believes that Haden is the best mango EVER--funny, it happens to be what's in her yard...I didn't even bother trying to convert her--she's already in mango heaven  ;) :o ???
~Jeff

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #85 on: June 15, 2015, 01:58:00 PM »
To Gary and others with bland Mahas, I wonder if severely reducing water to your plants will help intensify the flavor. I mean to the point of just keeping your plant alive. I know this will be difficult for people that live in a high rainfall area. I think thinning fruit from younger, heavily producing trees may help as well.

Simon

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #86 on: June 15, 2015, 02:15:04 PM »
To Gary and others with bland Mahas, I wonder if severely reducing water to your plants will help intensify the flavor. I mean to the point of just keeping your plant alive. I know this will be difficult for people that live in a high rainfall area. I think thinning fruit from younger, heavily producing trees may help as well.

Simon

If that were the issue, virtually nobody would have Mahas with any flavor.
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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #87 on: June 15, 2015, 02:38:54 PM »
I love Dot and Southern Blush

Funny, but Southern Blush was the first mango that I ever tasted that made me want to actually plant a mango tree.  I finally did in about 1991 and Southern Blush will always hold a special place on my property and in my heart (and mouth) as the first producing mango tree in my yard.  When at peak of perfection, still an excellent mango capable of wowing any mango connoisseur.
Harry
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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #88 on: June 15, 2015, 03:29:09 PM »
I admit I made the comment as to whether Southern Blush should make the list of what belongs in my yard.  I have never tasted an excellent southern blush.  At best, I would put the southern blush I have tasted in the very good category with most in just the good category.  I have eaten excellent fruit from Dot, Florigon, Mulgoba, Rosa, Cushman, Spirit of 76, PPK, Maha Chanok, Carrie, and many other older cultivars, but not Southern Blush.  Maybe I need to add a "yet" to that statement.  I would prefer to have a low production excellent tasting tree than a high production limited to the very good category.  I already have that with Glenn, 400+ good to very good fruit, which go straight to the dehydrator because I have better fruit to enjoy. 

I have a southern blush tree planted.  I have no plans to remove it.  However, I live on 2.5 acres and still have room for more trees.  Based on my experience, I do not think I would recommend it to someone that only had room for 10 mango trees.
Brandon

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #89 on: June 15, 2015, 03:41:06 PM »
I admit I made the comment as to whether Southern Blush should make the list of what belongs in my yard.  I have never tasted an excellent southern blush.  At best, I would put the southern blush I have tasted in the very good category with most in just the good category.  I have eaten excellent fruit from Dot, Florigon, Mulgoba, Rosa, Cushman, Spirit of 76, PPK, Maha Chanok, Carrie, and many other older cultivars, but not Southern Blush.  Maybe I need to add a "yet" to that statement.  I would prefer to have a low production excellent tasting tree than a high production limited to the very good category.  I already have that with Glenn, 400+ good to very good fruit, which go straight to the dehydrator because I have better fruit to enjoy. 

I have a southern blush tree planted.  I have no plans to remove it.  However, I live on 2.5 acres and still have room for more trees.  Based on my experience, I do not think I would recommend it to someone that only had room for 10 mango trees.

Brandon, I was not referring to anythng you said (sorry you just outed yourself).  It was somebody else who said it to me after you left.
- Rob

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #90 on: June 15, 2015, 04:19:58 PM »
So two people were talking smack to you about southern blush.  Yesterday was a rough day for southern blush. 

;D  I think I am establishing myself as a mango elitist. I consider myself very lucky to be surrounded by fellow enthusiasts so we can all make better mango choices in the future!
Brandon

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Re: A New Maha Chanok Convert
« Reply #91 on: June 15, 2015, 06:23:20 PM »
So two people were talking smack to you about southern blush.  Yesterday was a rough day for southern blush. 

;D  I think I am establishing myself as a mango elitist. I consider myself very lucky to be surrounded by fellow enthusiasts so we can all make better mango choices in the future!

A mango elitist with the stated goal of improving mango selection in the mango growing world.  What a noble endeavor.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

 

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