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Author Topic: Sick avocado  (Read 2740 times)

merce3

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Sick avocado
« on: June 08, 2015, 08:10:49 PM »
Can anyone take a look at my poncho avocado and recommend a course of action? I think I fried it initially with too much fertilizer, but now it seems to be rotting in different areas. the branches were also spindly for a while, but then the new growth that sprouted was fatter for some reason. one of the new branches that sprouted off the trunk seems healthy, and there are new leaves sprouting in different areas. should I trim it back or leave it be?

it has rained quite a bit the last couple of weeks, but the mix has a lot of perlite and my FL hass avocado seems to be fine. it is planted in the ground though. any thoughts?


Diospyros

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2015, 05:22:08 AM »
I would not trim it now as it might stress it even more. Paint the bare branches and the trunc (virtually the whole tree) with a white latex paint mix (50% water / 50% white paint) to avoid sun burn which will kill the exposed tissue and everntually the plant.

Don't over water it, let it come back completely then you'll know where to make your cuts...

If it turns out the only branch still alive is the one that has already sprouted, you'll have to train it to become your new leader. If you should leave it that way your tree would have a very unbalanced structure and that would be good!
« Last Edit: June 09, 2015, 05:24:44 AM by Diospyros »

merce3

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2015, 04:56:04 PM »
I would not trim it now as it might stress it even more. Paint the bare branches and the trunc (virtually the whole tree) with a white latex paint mix (50% water / 50% white paint) to avoid sun burn which will kill the exposed tissue and everntually the plant.

Don't over water it, let it come back completely then you'll know where to make your cuts...

If it turns out the only branch still alive is the one that has already sprouted, you'll have to train it to become your new leader. If you should leave it that way your tree would have a very unbalanced structure and that would be good!

thanks for the response. i will pick up some paint today and hit my other avocado tree while i'm at it.

what are the benefits of having an unbalanced structure?

Diospyros

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2015, 05:43:17 PM »
I meant wouldn't be good of course!!! The trunk could snap or twist with the wind...

merce3

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2015, 11:00:10 PM »
gotcha... well i gave it a coat of 50/50. guess i'll have to wait and see what happens.

Diospyros

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2015, 05:51:44 AM »
Your tree should survive no matter what since it has come back, the only question marks is will it sprout in other places or not, if it does try and make it balanced (if not possible because everything grows on the same side for instance, keep the most vigourous, healthy branch and tie it to the stick to train it as your new leader and pinch it to force it to branch out) if it doesnt sprout in other places cut the dead wood and tie than new branch to the stick and train it as your new leader then top it to force it to branch out ... and voila!

bsbullie

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2015, 07:58:07 AM »
No need to paint the "trunk"/branches with paint.  What type of potting mix did you use?  Are there drain holes in the bottom of the pot?  Also make sure the pot is not sitting on a tray. 
- Rob

Mark in Texas

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2015, 08:52:22 AM »
If you have a heavy clay soil (which I doubt if you do) and you amended the soil, you will lost the tree to root rot.  NEVER amend clay soil.

bsbullie

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2015, 09:37:21 AM »
If you have a heavy clay soil (which I doubt if you do) and you amended the soil, you will lost the tree to root rot.  NEVER amend clay soil.

His tree is in a pot.
- Rob

Mark in Texas

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2015, 09:49:44 AM »
OK. I see where his Hass is in the ground.  Based on the looks of the top, something is wrong with the bottom.  Also, if you move a tree from a protected area to full sun it will induce stress....leaf drop.

Avocados don't like a lot of salts so the fertilizer could have been the culprit.  I learned that the hard way.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2015, 09:53:38 AM by Mark in Texas »

merce3

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2015, 05:48:04 PM »
No need to paint the "trunk"/branches with paint.  What type of potting mix did you use?  Are there drain holes in the bottom of the pot?  Also make sure the pot is not sitting on a tray.

well, i guess painting it couldn't do any harm. i used fox farm's ocean floor potting soil and added a little more perlite. it was airy to begin with, but i did it just in case. there are drain holes on the bottom and it is sitting on a sandy/mulched surface, so i think i am covered there too.

i guess trunk is the wrong terminology... is it the main stem then?

merce3

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2015, 05:50:04 PM »
OK. I see where his Hass is in the ground.  Based on the looks of the top, something is wrong with the bottom.  Also, if you move a tree from a protected area to full sun it will induce stress....leaf drop.

Avocados don't like a lot of salts so the fertilizer could have been the culprit.  I learned that the hard way.

yeah, i think it was a combination of overfertilizing and too much sun exposure.

Diospyros

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2015, 08:53:25 PM »
I don't know if over exposure to the sun is the culprit, salts on the other hand... just a little too much fertilizer and there goes your beautiful folliage.

I recommended painting the "trunk" and branches to avoid any sun burns while the tree is naked. Merce3's mentionning of rotting branches is consistent with sun burns following defolliation.

 You don't want to add insult to injury and painting the tree can't do any harm!

I'm rulling out root rot because of the light soil the tree is sitting in. In case of root rot, necrosis would have walked its way from the tip of the branches down the the collar of the tree...

« Last Edit: June 10, 2015, 08:57:41 PM by Diospyros »

edzone9

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2015, 09:45:24 PM »
I had a few potted avocado trees that look like yours, I removed them from the pot, Cleaned the dirt from the root ball , & re-potted the tree in fresh potting soil, I placed it in a partial shade location & did not fertilized until the tree came back, Saved a few trees that way..

Good Luck Ed..
 
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Mark in Texas

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2015, 08:00:38 AM »
The need to paint the exposed trunk/branches is the grower's call.  I planted a young 3' tall Joey in my clay loam soil about 2 months ago. It was fairly hardened off with wood being not a bright green but a dull cross between burnt orange and green.  We're now into the summer solstice, temps are rising, and it's doing great with a fresh foliage push and holding a couple of fruit.   Taken yesterday - 


« Last Edit: June 11, 2015, 08:28:57 AM by Mark in Texas »

merce3

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2015, 08:09:20 AM »
I am scared to report it right now. I wanted to put it in the ground, but I need to wait for it to recover first.

bsbullie

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2015, 08:22:01 AM »
I would make sure it is not in full sun and care for as normal.   These are not delicate trees, it will hopefully recover and flourish and if not, you may be best to dispose of it and srart anew instead of nursing a struggling pkant.
- Rob

Jsvand5

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2015, 09:58:35 AM »
I am scared to report it right now. I wanted to put it in the ground, but I need to wait for it to recover first.

If you are planning to put it in the ground anyway I would do it now. It will definitely do better and recover faster in the ground.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Sick avocado
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2015, 01:46:39 PM »
I've hand planted thousands of trees and it's all about timing and technique.  The more time you give a tree to become established before the heat of the summer the better.  Translation - plant deciduous trees (oaks, maples, pecans) in late fall or early winter, plant tropicals after the danger of frost has passed in the spring.

I'd baby it in the pot and if you don't get freezes plant it in late fall when there's less sun stress and it's cooler.   

 

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