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Author Topic: Carambola grafting  (Read 2319 times)

Hobo62288

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Carambola grafting
« on: July 09, 2015, 06:17:09 PM »
I am completely 100% new to Tropical fruit as of 3 months ago.  Ive bought plenty of seeds and started those but haven't bought any good live cultivars.  I am about to receive some B-17 star fruit scions and was wondering if I could treat these like cuttings and root them or will I have to graft them onto a live tree?  If I have to graft them then how old must the tree be to do this?  Any info is appreciated. 

gunnar429

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Re: Carambola grafting
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2015, 06:23:07 PM »
welcome.

Morton's Fruits of Warm Climates is a great place to start for info...I don't see anything about rooting cuttings though it does say air-layering works, but isn't productive...

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/carambola.html
~Jeff

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marklee

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Re: Carambola grafting
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2015, 04:31:01 AM »
Grafting Carambola is the way to go, just do a simple cleft graft and have the rootstock actively growing and the scions with some buds and keep in the sun if it isn't too hot. I am near the coast and I can leave grafts unprotected and they do fine. Good luck

jabotica

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Re: Carambola grafting
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2015, 09:56:42 PM »
I have had no success air layering  nor have I cleft graffs, but I have had good luck with side veneir graffs On pencil size or less 3 or 4 inches long
The branches have a zig zag shape so try to line up sion to the shape of the branch. Good luck.
                     Robert

Hobo62288

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Re: Carambola grafting
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2015, 10:59:07 PM »
If you order scions from USDA do you typically get a certain size?  Would it be thin enough to do a veneer graft like you described or would the cleft be better for these?

carcarlo

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Re: Carambola grafting
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2015, 04:48:08 PM »
Hi Hobo62228, I have heard they do grow from cuttings, but I have never try one before, so if you have 6 to 10 inch cutting/scions  , why not try one of the Pepsi Cola bottles that I posted about,and see if it works, let us know if they root.
Carlos

Droshi

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Re: Carambola grafting
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2015, 09:17:52 PM »
Cleft/whip grafting is generally easier for me. The downside is that you must match up the rootstock to scion size for cambium to match up.

Side Veneer has a lot of benefits. You can have different size rootstock & scion, positioning can be more flexible, and generally you can leave on some foliage to keep pumping energy into the rootstock. Downside is that it's a more difficult cut to make, and keeping the cambiums lined up while securing with grafting tape can be challenging.

So basically, I would use all methods, if you can match size then go for a cleft or whip depending on preference. If not, go for a side veneer.

fyliu

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Re: Carambola grafting
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2015, 09:30:04 PM »
Whip and tongue graft worked for me earlier this year. Good amount of growth so far.

Cleft is easier to do though, and works for larger diameters (half inch or more).

 

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