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Author Topic: air layering question  (Read 3415 times)

Tropicalnut

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air layering question
« on: July 12, 2015, 03:15:25 PM »
Hello! I was wondering if once you wrapped your air laying with the moist medium around, is it necessary to keep checking the medium to keep it moist? or do I just leave it alone and just check in a few weeks so see of it took?
I have read a few articles and and seen videos in how to do it, some says leave an "air hole" others just "enclose it completely" so I don't know which one is more successful, Please help, I want to air layer my guava tree. Thanks in advance! Xenia

greenman62

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2015, 04:27:15 PM »
If you leave any kind of hole,
you will have to check it often, maybe daily
to see if its dried out.
Everything i have read says to wrap it up tight.
When i air-layered my guava, it seems it took a long time
like 2 months if i remember right....

another option for a guava, is a root-cutting.

i had a sucker come up from the ground on my guava
i dug around it, and had to cut the root several inches down with Pruning shears,
but, i came up with 2ft of root as thick as my thumb.
6 months later the tree is 3ft tall and fruiting.

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2015, 05:00:40 PM »
Thanks for your reply, I don't have any suckers at this time but I will keep my eye open for them, now that I know what t to do with them. :)

Finca La Isla

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2015, 08:40:11 PM »
How long it takes can really vary.  The trees we layer take anywhere from 1-3 months.  We use aluminum foil for wrapping and wrap tight.  In a dry climate I think that you need to check for moisture, especially as the roots start as they use moisture too.
Peter

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2015, 10:44:34 PM »
Peter how do I check for moisture without unwrapping it? and if it is dry, what is the best method to re-moist?

fruitlovers

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2015, 05:39:57 AM »
In wet areas you never have to remoisten the moss. (A bigger problem here is rain getting in and causing rot.) But you live in "Aridzona".  ;) So yes, you are definitely going to have to remoisten the moss, this time of year probably very often. I suggest using a hypodermic needle. That way you don't need to make a hole, just shoot the water in slowly from top and let trickle down.
Oscar

Finca La Isla

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2015, 09:33:57 AM »
Oscars' idea of the needle sounds good.  We use coco fiber as the medium.  For a dry area I would carefully consider the water holding capacity.  Maybe adding perlite or something would be an advantage.
Peter

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2015, 01:07:29 PM »
Yes the needle idea is great!
I used a combination of moth and coco fiber, and will keep and yes I am in Arizona and as you probably know is very hot and dry here, but now we are entering the monsoon season so its a bit more humid but still hot.

fruitlovers

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2015, 05:17:04 PM »
You should also consider proper use of exterior wrapping material, and also good placement on the tree, so that the air layer ball doesn't cook in intense sun.
Oscar

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2015, 06:00:13 PM »
I used Sara Wrap and the grafting tape to secure it to the branch. But I could cover it with aluminun foil if it would help, I though maybe the aluminun foil may make it hotter that is why I didn't use it. Xenia

Finca La Isla

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2015, 06:56:58 PM »
You get different opiniones on this but i think that plants root best when it is dark in the rooting area.  If you agree with that then what you see is black plastic or foil around here.  You want a good quality foil that doesn't tear too easily.  With experience it is the quickest to put on and tighten.  We can have trouble with birds that are attracted to thE shiny foil, or they find it easier to break into for getting nest material, but this is what we have been going with for years.  Black plastic needs to be tied or taped on, not as convenient.
Peter

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2015, 07:20:13 PM »
Maybe I will do an experiment, some with black plastic and some with aluminum foil ans see which one works better,  ;)

fruitlovers

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #12 on: July 13, 2015, 07:38:25 PM »
Maybe I will do an experiment, some with black plastic and some with aluminum foil ans see which one works better,  ;)
Strongly suggest you skip the black plastic, that will get extremely hot inside. Aluminum foil reflects heat out, especially attached with shiny side out. What i do is put two layers of aluminum foil. That keeps it from tearing, and most birds can't peck through double layer of foil. As Peter points out, foil is much easier than plastic to use because it doesn't need to be tied on. Just twist ends on tightly.
Oscar

joaave

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2015, 12:09:29 AM »
 a friend made it on rollinia, 3 months . I hope experiment in the futere when my biribá growht

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2015, 12:53:13 PM »
Thanks for the advice Oscar, I will put aluminum foil around it, I tried watering with a 20G needle yesterday, it was a bit time consuming with a small syringe, then I figure I use one of those ketchup bottles (bigger hole:o) it seemed to go in easier, later on I covered the small hole with the grafting tape that is tied around, I hope this works! :)

sotasty8

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2015, 06:18:19 PM »
Tropicalnut, you've got some good advice so far... I'm in Phx and we are just finishing up our guava air layering project. The aluminum foil wrapped tightly around to keep it dark, but not too hot worked well, and definitely keep it moist. We just watered gently with the hose once a week or so, but if we ever start the monsoon rains, you may not need to water much at all? We left a small opening at the top of the foil for ease of water to enter, and that worked well. Took about 2 months to get good roots, but all seemed to take, and I just cut and replaced 3 so far.

Good luck!

Bhkkatemoya

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2015, 10:57:17 PM »
I've tried a few ways to air layer.  The one I find most success in is soaking the sphagnum moss in the water for about 30 mins, wound the spot about an inch, rub rooting hormone or honey on, use a plastic bag to wrap the sphagnum moss around it, make sure to squeeze as much water off as you can, use black electric tape to seal both top and bottom from letting water in, seal the vertical line of the plastic bag as you close it, then use foil paper to wrap it again one more time to tighten everything. 

Other things to keep in mind are the time of year (preferably summer with strong heat) and branch out in the sun instead of inside the canopy.  I've been able to do quava, plum, wax Jambu, lemon, orange, and cherimoya with this method.  I normally give it 3 months for the weather here in San Diego.  Good luck.

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2015, 12:22:44 AM »
Thanks sotasty8, You gave me hope with my guava, I am definitely using the aluminum foil. :)
Bhkkatemoya, its encouraging to know that this project works so well. Thanks for the information.

fruitlovers

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2015, 01:12:57 AM »
I've tried a few ways to air layer.  The one I find most success in is soaking the sphagnum moss in the water for about 30 mins, wound the spot about an inch, rub rooting hormone or honey on, use a plastic bag to wrap the sphagnum moss around it, make sure to squeeze as much water off as you can, use black electric tape to seal both top and bottom from letting water in, seal the vertical line of the plastic bag as you close it, then use foil paper to wrap it again one more time to tighten everything. 

Other things to keep in mind are the time of year (preferably summer with strong heat) and branch out in the sun instead of inside the canopy.  I've been able to do quava, plum, wax Jambu, lemon, orange, and cherimoya with this method.  I normally give it 3 months for the weather here in San Diego.  Good luck.

All sounds good, except one very minor detail: sphagnum moss only needs 5 minutes to soak up the water. Then you squeeze all the water out of the moss with your hands before applying. With lychee rooting hormone is not necessary.
Oscar

Bhkkatemoya

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2015, 01:28:04 AM »
Thanks for the tip Oscar.  I'll try that next time. 

Tropicalnut

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #20 on: July 19, 2015, 03:27:42 PM »
 
Thanks to all of you who  answered my questions about air layering.  ;)
As I was watering my two week old guava air layerings this morning, I had to open one up because I had tried this particular one with a water bottle and the water was just running down the branch, so I figured I will remove it and just the Sarah wrap like I did with the other 4 branches. and to my surprise it looks like it is already showing signs of new growth.  :D




dragon

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2016, 08:23:14 PM »
I've tried a few ways to air layer.  The one I find most success in is soaking the sphagnum moss in the water for about 30 mins, wound the spot about an inch, rub rooting hormone or honey on, use a plastic bag to wrap the sphagnum moss around it, make sure to squeeze as much water off as you can, use black electric tape to seal both top and bottom from letting water in, seal the vertical line of the plastic bag as you close it, then use foil paper to wrap it again one more time to tighten everything. 

Other things to keep in mind are the time of year (preferably summer with strong heat) and branch out in the sun instead of inside the canopy.  I've been able to do quava, plum, wax Jambu, lemon, orange, and cherimoya with this method.  I normally give it 3 months for the weather here in San Diego.  Good luck.

All sounds good, except one very minor detail: sphagnum moss only needs 5 minutes to soak up the water. Then you squeeze all the water out of the moss with your hands before applying. With lychee rooting hormone is not necessary.

Did you air layered cherimoya successfully? For how long?

fyliu

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2016, 08:57:24 PM »
It's not worth airlayering cherimoya. Just start a seed and graft. I heard it takes many months but it can be done if you really insist on it. My friend really insist on air layering his atemoya and it's been about a year. Not sure if it's working or not.

Samu

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2016, 02:05:48 AM »
I tried air layering cherimoya at least 3 times in succession for a period of about one year, and all failed; while I had successes with citrus tree. It puzzled me!

Later on I found out (from "Plant propagation Chart") that cherimoya is not an air layering plant category...

So, go with fyliu's suggestion, just start a seed and graft on it!  :)
Sam

stuartdaly88

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Re: air layering question
« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2016, 07:44:56 AM »
I've tried a few ways to air layer.  The one I find most success in is soaking the sphagnum moss in the water for about 30 mins, wound the spot about an inch, rub rooting hormone or honey on, use a plastic bag to wrap the sphagnum moss around it, make sure to squeeze as much water off as you can, use black electric tape to seal both top and bottom from letting water in, seal the vertical line of the plastic bag as you close it, then use foil paper to wrap it again one more time to tighten everything. 

Other things to keep in mind are the time of year (preferably summer with strong heat) and branch out in the sun instead of inside the canopy.  I've been able to do quava, plum, wax Jambu, lemon, orange, and cherimoya with this method.  I normally give it 3 months for the weather here in San Diego.  Good luck.

You can use honey instead of rooting hormone?
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

 

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