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Author Topic: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos  (Read 3874 times)

Nisp66

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Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« on: August 08, 2015, 09:13:49 PM »
After reading a lot on this forum about the different mango flavors (spicy, mild, etc), I have to ask, how do Caribbean mangos differ in flavor to Florida mangos?

Raul

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2015, 10:16:16 PM »
After reading a lot on this forum about the different mango flavors (spicy, mild, etc), I have to ask, how do Caribbean mangos differ in flavor to Florida mangos?

Raul

Hi Raul

Florida has the best selected varieties in the world. Caribbean mangos tend to be stringy, spicy( yodo in Cuba)  less complex. There are great selections from the Caribbean and Mexico but most folks grow their mangos from seeds down there.

Nisp66

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2015, 05:03:47 PM »
Now I see what they mean by spicy.

Thanks JF.
Raul

Jani

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2015, 09:08:43 AM »
Is the question what/why are the flavor (and other) differences between the same mango varieties grown in the Caribbean (which still isn't homogenous) vs grown in Florida?

Or just something more general as a comparison?
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Jani

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2015, 09:25:32 AM »
After reading a lot on this forum about the different mango flavors (spicy, mild, etc), I have to ask, how do Caribbean mangos differ in flavor to Florida mangos?

Raul

Hi Raul

Florida has the best selected varieties in the world. Caribbean mangos tend to be stringy, spicy( yodo in Cuba)  less complex. There are great selections from the Caribbean and Mexico but most folks grow their mangos from seeds down there.

Dunno about this, but I guess there's no correct answer and it's all opinion.

But just consider, for example, they've been cultivating Mangos on the Indian subcontinent and surrounding regions for centuries before Florida and with well over a billion people there, many who I'd bet may have a different opinon (be it from exposure, palate, etc.) on the best selected varieties in the world and where they come from.

And there many other centuries old growing regions beyond there...

Also it's a bit of a generalization to say Carribbean mangoes all tend to be stringy and spicy and less complex. Just consider also that some Caribbean varieties are the origin for so many famed Florida decendants and their decendants (Julie comes to mind). Also many of the same varieities tend to taste and perform much better under Caribbean conditions, so eating a "Caribbean variety" that's Florida grown may give one the wrong impression..Florida Julies for example are a poor representation of their counterparts on the islands.

I think Caribbean people in general are less put off by fibers than the Florida/US mango interests..but that doesn't mean fibrous varieties are all that's there.

There's actually so much unknown about Caribbean varieties, and many unexplored varieties, heck I have a rich diverse Caribbean background and have discovered a few very high tier varieities (imo) on a recent trip, that apparently exisited right under my nose for decades. I'd like to explore, discover and bring some varities to light that just need the backing and exposure. Maybe one day when I get rich :)

Lastly, the whole grown mostly from seed thing, I think that implies a lack of awareness of mango cultivating practices in these regions that probably isn't accurate (at least in the oplaces I know well)..yes a lot of people grow seeds, but for the well known desired varieties that people want for their yards..actually grafted trees are obtained regularly and easily. Mango cultivating techniques are nothing new or under-known in the Caribbean, Indians brought and passed that knowledge to and in the islands a very long time ago.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2015, 09:30:34 AM by Jani »
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JF

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2015, 09:45:16 AM »
After reading a lot on this forum about the different mango flavors (spicy, mild, etc), I have to ask, how do Caribbean mangos differ in flavor to Florida mangos?

Raul

Hi Raul

Florida has the best selected varieties in the world. Caribbean mangos tend to be stringy, spicy( yodo in Cuba)  less complex. There are great selections from the Caribbean and Mexico but most folks grow their mangos from seeds down there.

Dunno about this, but I guess there's no correct answer and it's all opinion.

But just consider, for example, they've been cultivating Mangos on the Indian subcontinent and surrounding regions for centuries before Florida and with well over a billion people there, many who I'd bet may have a different opinon (be it from exposure, palate, etc.) on the best selected varieties in the world and where they come from.

And there many other centuries old growing regions beyond there...

Also it's a bit of a generalization to say Carribbean mangoes all tend to be stringy and spicy and less complex. Just consider also that some Caribbean varieties are the origin for so many famed Florida decendants and their decendants (Julie comes to mind). Also many of the same varieities tend to taste and perform much better under Caribbean conditions, so eating a "Caribbean variety" that's Florida grown may give one the wrong impression..Florida Julies for example are a poor representation of their counterparts on the islands.

I think Caribbean people in general are less put off by fibers than the Florida/US mango interests..but that doesn't mean fibrous varieties are all that's there.

There's actually so much unknown about Caribbean varieties, and many unexplored varieties, heck I have a rich diverse Caribbean background and have discovered a few very high tier varieities (imo) on a recent trip, that apparently exisited right under my nose for decades. I'd like to explore, discover and bring some varities to light that just need the backing and exposure. Maybe one day when I get rich :)

Lastly, the whole grown mostly from seed thing, I think that implies a lack of awareness of mango cultivating practices in these regions that probably isn't accurate (at least in the oplaces I know well)..yes a lot of people grow seeds, but for the well known desired varieties that people want for their yards..actually grafted trees are obtained regularly and easily. Mango cultivating techniques are nothing new or under-known in the Caribbean, Indians brought and passed that knowledge to and in the islands a very long time ago.

Jani
I'm not trying to offend anyone I'm caribeno....I am explaining to my paisano the main reason. I know it's a generalization

Jani

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2015, 10:42:31 AM »

Jani
I'm not trying to offend anyone I'm caribeno....I am explaining to my paisano the main reason. I know it's a generalization

None taken JF, just giving a different viewpoint in response to his questions about Caribbean mangoes. There's a lot that isn't known about mangoes there based mostly on these generalizations that get passed along.
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Tropicdude

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2015, 01:38:10 PM »

Jani
I'm not trying to offend anyone I'm caribeno....I am explaining to my paisano the main reason. I know it's a generalization

None taken JF, just giving a different viewpoint in response to his questions about Caribbean mangoes. There's a lot that isn't known about mangoes there based mostly on these generalizations that get passed along.

Generally speaking, here in the DR.  its all about the sugar baby,  if its sweet, it doesn't matter how many strings it has.  sweet = good.   gradually  some people are migrating away from traditional varieties,  when asked  over 90% of the time they will say "Banilejo" is their favorite,  its almost un patriotic to say otherwise :) .  but when I look at the buyers at fruit stands, I see them buying Keitts, Pascual, Palmer etc.

I think there is a kind of imprinting that goes on.  flavors we grow up with are what we tend to use as a reference.  people around here grew up eating Banilejo,  so when they try a new variety,  they will be comparing it with what they "know" a good mango should taste like.   same can be said about mama's spaghetti , its always the best.

this is why you will have Aussies comparing every mango to Kensington Pride.  the same happens between India and Pakistan, each claiming theirs is the better mango,  yes it could be pride,  but you will also find this between different regions within India, Alphonso may be declared the King of the mangoes,  but it is not the favorite of everyone in India.

To a person that grew up eating mangoes with a strong turpentine undertone,  to that person, that is the ideal mango, and will compare all others to those he grew up on.

American ( generally ) like that sweet tart,  this is why we have Apple pie made with Granny Smith apples,  and Cherry pie,  we like our lemonade, and Orange juice. Cranberries, strawberries,  its about that balance between tart and sweet.  In the DR  its different,  sweet is priority,  less acid, less tart.  Fibers are not a problem, because they never were as a child why would they be now?
 
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Jani

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2015, 03:01:03 PM »

Jani
I'm not trying to offend anyone I'm caribeno....I am explaining to my paisano the main reason. I know it's a generalization

None taken JF, just giving a different viewpoint in response to his questions about Caribbean mangoes. There's a lot that isn't known about mangoes there based mostly on these generalizations that get passed along.

Generally speaking, here in the DR.  its all about the sugar baby,  if its sweet, it doesn't matter how many strings it has.  sweet = good.   gradually  some people are migrating away from traditional varieties,  when asked  over 90% of the time they will say "Banilejo" is their favorite,  its almost un patriotic to say otherwise :) .  but when I look at the buyers at fruit stands, I see them buying Keitts, Pascual, Palmer etc.

I think there is a kind of imprinting that goes on.  flavors we grow up with are what we tend to use as a reference.  people around here grew up eating Banilejo,  so when they try a new variety,  they will be comparing it with what they "know" a good mango should taste like.   same can be said about mama's spaghetti , its always the best.

this is why you will have Aussies comparing every mango to Kensington Pride.  the same happens between India and Pakistan, each claiming theirs is the better mango,  yes it could be pride,  but you will also find this between different regions within India, Alphonso may be declared the King of the mangoes,  but it is not the favorite of everyone in India.

To a person that grew up eating mangoes with a strong turpentine undertone,  to that person, that is the ideal mango, and will compare all others to those he grew up on.

American ( generally ) like that sweet tart,  this is why we have Apple pie made with Granny Smith apples,  and Cherry pie,  we like our lemonade, and Orange juice. Cranberries, strawberries,  its about that balance between tart and sweet.  In the DR  its different,  sweet is priority,  less acid, less tart.  Fibers are not a problem, because they never were as a child why would they be now?

Good post
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Nisp66

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2015, 08:53:35 PM »
Is the question what/why are the flavor (and other) differences between the same mango varieties grown in the Caribbean (which still isn't homogenous) vs grown in Florida?

Or just something more general as a comparison?

Jani,

My question was just more of a comparison between Mangos from Florida and the Caribbean. I grew up eating Cuban mangos that were stringy and of no particular variety (seedlings). So I wanted to know if there was such a big difference in flavor. When my paisano JF mentioned stringy, spicy (yodo taste) being some of the characteristics of the mangos I was familiar with, I knew exactly what he meant. Thank you and Tropicdude for your input.

Raul

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2015, 09:50:46 PM »
I have a co-worker from the DR and all I heard was benilejo, I gave him a few of lemon merengue\ppk's,he now has a new favorite.There are a lot of flavors out there that need to be explored.

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2015, 02:30:01 AM »
After reading a lot on this forum about the different mango flavors (spicy, mild, etc), I have to ask, how do Caribbean mangos differ in flavor to Florida mangos?

Raul

Hi Raul

Florida has the best selected varieties in the world. Caribbean mangos tend to be stringy, spicy( yodo in Cuba)  less complex. There are great selections from the Caribbean and Mexico but most folks grow their mangos from seeds down there.

I love the different notes in the spicy and stringy mangoes, subtle but really noticeable. You are right though, ~Florida does have the better fruits.
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Tropicdude

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2015, 01:00:59 PM »
I have a co-worker from the DR and all I heard was benilejo, I gave him a few of lemon merengue\ppk's,he now has a new favorite.There are a lot of flavors out there that need to be explored.

I am like Johnny Mango Seed down here,  I often get my hands on some fruit from Florida varieties , and give them to friends and co workers,  even trees,  recently gave a Kesar tree to a friend that bought some land,  also grafting a few Maha to spread those genetics.  :) do similar with some other fruit,  specially dragon fruit , people want a plant almost instantly after trying one.    This year Kents were above average quality,  best I have had in years.   a typical reaction I get from co workers trying one for the first time, is,   these are not as sweet but they have a good flavor,  then they notice the lack of fiber.  then they ask me if these fruit are off my tree :)

getting back on topic,  there is one variety that many consider local but I am not sure where the heck it originated from, I believe it was introduced back in the 60s from fairchild,  the variety called "Pascual" very large mango, looks like a Madam Francis on steroids,   depending on the stage you eat them at, slightly under ripe, they are acidic and remind me of a slightly under ripe pineapple, but perfectly ripened they are pretty good.  what I am saying with this is that even within local varieties you have different preferences.   

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WGphil

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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2015, 06:42:58 PM »
My Fairchild with Central American roots does well here in Central Florida.   Easy to grow, no problems with bugs or having to spray in a wet and hot climate.  Taste is great with my last one off less than a week ago.    You can pick it a bit greener and it will ripen better than some other types.

When a tree is that easy to grow, the natural conditions can be similar or it is just that easy to grow.  It is one or the other if not both. 

I have some other well known types that are about to get dug up to make room for better types for my taste.  The Fairchild stays.   




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Re: Mango flavor differences between caribbean and Florida Mangos
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2015, 03:42:09 PM »
My Fairchild with Central American roots does well here in Central Florida.   Easy to grow, no problems with bugs or having to spray in a wet and hot climate.  Taste is great with my last one off less than a week ago.    You can pick it a bit greener and it will ripen better than some other types.
When a tree is that easy to grow, the natural conditions can be similar or it is just that easy to grow.  It is one or the other if not both. 
I have some other well known types that are about to get dug up to make room for better types for my taste.  The Fairchild stays.   

I give Fairchild props all the time. It is bulletproof, productive, tastes great. An unassuming mango tree. The tree has muted colored fruit. No flashy reds or purples.
Fairchild Fruit is on the small side so a better bet for northern Florida, being that smaller fruit has better chance of the entire fruit ripening outside of the South Florida hot zones (sub-tropical climate)
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 03:43:59 PM by zands »

 

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