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Author Topic: Compact Mango Suggestions  (Read 60474 times)

Guanabanus

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #50 on: September 02, 2015, 08:30:49 PM »
MahaChanok fruits very well as a small tree--- almost as precocious as Pickering.   I have not seen older trees.

Honey Kiss is precocious and fruits very well as a small tree.

Son Pari and White Pari, both from India, fruit very well as small, compact trees.

Edgar, from Zill, also fruits very well as a small tree.
Har

mangokothiyan

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #51 on: September 02, 2015, 08:44:33 PM »
New variety, available next year:

Cotton Candy, original tree, planted out in the field in the late nineties, and never pruned, is still under 20 feet.  It has not been observed grafted onto Turpentine rootstock.

Har, how productive is the original Cotton Candy tree? I got to taste it this yer and absolutely loved it.  Also, is Zills planning to release Honey Kiss and Edgar?

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #52 on: September 02, 2015, 09:10:57 PM »
New variety, available next year:

Cotton Candy, original tree, planted out in the field in the late nineties, and never pruned, is still under 20 feet.  It has not been observed grafted onto Turpentine rootstock.

Nice! I will add to the list, thanks!
- Mark

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #53 on: September 02, 2015, 09:12:00 PM »
MahaChanok fruits very well as a small tree--- almost as precocious as Pickering.   I have not seen older trees.

Honey Kiss is precocious and fruits very well as a small tree.

Son Pari and White Pari, both from India, fruit very well as small, compact trees.

Edgar, from Zill, also fruits very well as a small tree.

Right on! Thanks for all the suggestions!
- Mark

Mark in Texas

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #54 on: September 04, 2015, 01:15:23 PM »
PIN is recommending the Alampur Baneshan which fits Starch's and my criteria.  Have seen a few comments about very small cracks but they seem to come from outdoor growers which suggests to me uneven water either via the gardener, mama nature, or both.

Cogshall seems like a good choice too!  Any thoughts on that?

JF

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #55 on: September 04, 2015, 01:33:15 PM »
PIN is recommending the Alampur Baneshan which fits Starch's and my criteria.  Have seen a few comments about very small cracks but they seem to come from outdoor growers which suggests to me uneven water either via the gardener, mama nature, or both.

Cogshall seems like a good choice too!  Any thoughts on that?

I don't know much about Alampur other than PIN is pushing it in some of the nurseries in SoCal but Cogshall is a small compact grower here in my yard. Taste wise it doesn't come close to Pickering but it's a solid producer. I saw a mature Cogshall in USDA Miami this summer under 12'. I would rate it as a solid second tier mango.

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #56 on: September 04, 2015, 01:52:33 PM »
Master list updated!
- Mark

Guanabanus

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #57 on: September 04, 2015, 06:19:29 PM »
A small number of 'Cotton Candy' have been grafted.  'Honey Kiss' is on the to-do list.   'Edgar', not yet.
Har

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #58 on: September 06, 2015, 11:32:34 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Alampur Baneshsan

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- My tree is over ten (10) years old and is planted in the ground.  It stands approx. eigth (8) feet tall. Here is the negative report about this variety! The fruit has a tendency to split and crack.  Maybe you can control the amount of moisture and resolve the splitting  and cracking issue, by growing them in a large pot. By the way, this mango variety is a very slow grower, and I would recommend it if you don't' mind the fruit splitting. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Alampur Baneshan produces reasonably well in Florida for an Indian mango but definitely has horrible issues with splitting. Its probably worse than NDM #4 in that regard actually.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

?

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Alanpur Baneshsan is a very flavorful mango.  The only problem is, the flavor it has isn't a flavor that everyone likes.  It is very strong flavored and has a considerable resinous twang. The flesh does remain very pale yellow, almost white in appearance even when ripe.  The exteriror doesn't color up either.  On top of that, it tends to have major issues here at my property with splitting on the tree just before being ready for harvest.  Well, its not splitting in the manor that Nam Doc splits.  It is more of a cracking with multiple small cracks forming, as oppposed to one giant crack/split that Nam Doc has.  In either case the fruit is ruined.  So for South Florida, in mucky wet soil, this is another Indian selection that you just won't get to enjoy much fruit from.(REF)

-- Alampur Baneshan is a very fragrant and spice mango.  I would say that it is a mango for people that like full flavored unusual mangoes. The skin remains mostly
green when mature, and the flesh is kind of pale.  However, the flesh packs a good punch of smells and flavors. (REF)
- Mark

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #59 on: September 06, 2015, 12:01:56 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Angie

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- semi dwarf in growth habit.(REF)

-- It is definitely larger in habit than the Pickering, maybe Cogshall-ish in size but a bit more spreading in shape.  That's my experience anyway ... Hope that helps, and I'll try to get some pics soon (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- It is productive ... The fruit can vary in size from year to year but overall at most times and seasons excellent in eating quality (REF)

-- I don't have any current pics at the moment, but the tree has actually put on little size over the past year.  It held 20 or so fruit in 2011, and then only partially flushed once after harvest.  This year the fruit set about doubled, with 40-50 fruit making it to maturity. This is it's 3rd year in the ground irc.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

--  it is the late part of the early season to early part of the mid season.  It is definitely not an April/May mango or even early June for that matter, IMO.(REF)

-- Angie ripens at exactly the same time as Pickering (June) and is not an early mango as "advertised" by Dr. Campbell, "harvested before the rainy season." (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- It can and has been an excellent mango.  There have been numerous tastings that I have been involved with where it has vied for top billing.  Unfortunately, it does have some inconsistencies. There have been years where the flavor has been off for some unexplained reason.  For me, it is still a keeper. ... excellent in eating quality on the Fairchild scale of Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor.  And yes, Angie is an early season mango.(REF)

-- Well, 4 fruits in and this seasons Angie fruits are shaping up to be disappointing. The first 2 fell and had considerable anthracnose damage. The next two I picked when they showed some yellowing. The one that looked perfectly ripened (although a rather ugly specimen) was in fact overripe, so I picked a second one that looked a day underripe to compare, it's top was underripe, but the nose was edging up on overripe. So they seem to be ripening unevenly, and the overripe bits are quite mushy. Now, on to the flavor - it is like a roulette game - most bites taste terrible, a bitter taste I don't enjoy, and the occasional bit has excellent flavor, with just the slightest tinge of that unpleasant flavor.  Just  good enough so I can see how. If the bitter taste was absent, they'd be excellent. But so far the reality is I didn't finish any of the 4, they were that bad:( the tree is holding about 20 more, and a couple are quite nicely shaped and unblemished, unlike these first few. So I'll wait to try those, but if the flavor of the lot of them is bad I think I'll be looking to replace this tree next year with a more reliable flavor producer. My space is too precious for an iffy pick. (REF)

-- I'm in Miami and my Angie's look nothing like yours. My tree gives me beautiful clean fruit with a pink/red shoulder, the flesh is sweet silky smooth no fiber and a slight papaya undertone/aftertaste. The first year my tree fruited it did not wow me but this year they were great. As I said earlier it does have a resinous taste near the skin and the stem. This is more prominent if eaten too underripe. I am not very fond of the resinous taste but the key to it is to cut the skin away before eating or slicing and it is completely gone. (REF)

-- The Angies i've had this year have been superb. Lots of excellent feedback from people who have tried it as well. Definitely a top tier mango and so many positive traits in terms of tree size and growth habit, production and precocity. A decent subset of Americans will probably not like it due to the Carrie-like flavor. But people with Indian and west indie backgrounds (aka people who actually buy mangos) will absolutely love Angie(REF)
- Mark

bsbullie

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #60 on: September 06, 2015, 12:43:40 PM »
Edgar is a more vigorous grower.  Would be tough to keep small/compact.

Honey Kiss shohld be available in a year or so.  Very slow grower.

Mahachanok will get larger than Pickering.   Pickering will give more fruit as a smaller tree than Mahachanok.

Har - you sure about the Cotton Candy never being pruned throughout its life?
« Last Edit: September 06, 2015, 05:48:22 PM by bsbullie »
- Rob

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #61 on: September 06, 2015, 04:24:54 PM »
Edgar is a more vigorous grower.  Would be tough to keep small/compact.

Boney Kiss shohld be available in a year or so.  Very slow grower.

Mahachanok will get larger than Pickering.   Pickering will give more fruit as a smaller tree than Mahachanok.

Har - you sure about the Cotton Candy never being pruned throughout its life?

Rob, thanks for the info!
- Mark

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #62 on: September 06, 2015, 04:25:40 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Baptiste

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- The tree is ease to manage for size and has characteristically small leaves with a light green color. The tree and fruit are moderately susceptible to anthracnose infection. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

?

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Baptiste is a good looking small to mid sized mango I bought from Truly Tropiccal.  Yellow on the outside, yellow orange on the inside.  It has a faint turpentine taste mixed with sweetness and is reasonably fragrant.  On its own, it would be a decent mango, fibre free and juicy.(REF)

-- 'Baptiste' was selected in Haiti, where it is grown on a locally commercial scale. The fruit are oval, with a smooth, non-waxy skin, weighing from 8 to 16 oz. They are bright yellow to orange and are exceptionally firm, with surprisingly little fiber. The flesh is a deep orange, with a mild and sweet flavor. 'Baptiste' is popular in Haiti, and can be found in local markets, but it is mostly unknown outside of the island.(REF)

-- 'Baptiste' is actually not very juicy.   Haitians sometimes describe it as a "dry" mango--- one that can be eaten without first taking off one's shirt!  It has good, low-fibre texture, and is quite sweet, with an odd spiceyness.  If you didn't grow up eating it or hearing that it was grandpa's favorite, don't get one before trying the fruit.(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 10:56:28 PM by starch »
- Mark

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #63 on: September 06, 2015, 04:54:00 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Carrie

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Carrie is a bushy grower but not compact. It is a medium fast grower(REF)

-- Smallish, compact growth habit which is easy to control and does not have a lot of fungal/disease problems. At least here in Central Florida.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- 40 mangos on a three year old tree sounds pretty darn good. (REF)

-- Reliable bearer when mature, Disease resistant(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- This is the last Carrie fruit on the tree two fell off today (Aug 08). It is still green hope it holds till september. I got well over 100 fruit from june till now(REF)

-- its still only mid May and Carrie are usually ready sometime in June . (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- It's been a bad year for uneven ripening. Many of my mango trees have had the same issue. It's easy to mitigate though -- pick the fruit while green and ripen indoors. I actually prefer carrie picked green to tree-ripened carries anyway (flesh is firmer and retains more acidity that way).(REF)

-- Yeah, unless you miss a few on a full grown tree, Carries should be picked mature green or at most, a slight color break on the shoulders (not sunburn but actual color break).  When the ripen on the tree, the texture gets really soft, actuall too soft, and the taste it below par as far as a Carrie goes.(REF)

-- The Carries I've eaten were all fallen from the tree at the F&S Park, very yellow, slightly soft and very good. Carrie should be eaten quickly once ripe. They don't keep long. I would wait for more yellow coloration. Look at the PIN picture.(REF)

-- DO NOT rely on yellow color while picking Carrie. Some on my tree will stay 100% green while fully ripe inside. If you are not sure, bend it  90 degrees up and if ready, it will come off on its own. When ripe, the top of the mango around the stem will fill out and form into a "butt-shape" :) Once it is no longer thin near the stem and fills out it should ripen properly. And when picked, I prefer to eat them when it begins to soften slightly to the touch and begin to smell.(REF)

-- Finally a break from all those mild tasting FL varieties!! Strong flavor plus piney taste made of of my favorites. Supposedly has very short window for perfection. I tried 5 Carries in various stages, and they were all excellent mangoes. Failed to see all that fuss about window of perfection and hate relationship some people have to this variety. Also refrigerated Carries are simply awesome. Refrigeration actually increases overall appeal with Carrie. It isn't necessarily true with other varieties. (REF)

-- The 'Carrie' mango variety demystified:

It's a very peculiar thing, describing the taste of the 'Carrie' mango. And, I've noticed that description of this variety can vary greatly from one person to another. This flavor description phenomenon does not happen in any other mango variety, that I'm aware of. For the record, I love this mango variety so much, that I have two planted trees.

The Carrie mango is very popular in island countries like Jamaica in the Caribbean, reportedly, this is due to its 'spicy' undertone flavors.

I'd really like to give it a shot, to describe the 'Carrie' mango eating experience. For example, I never have forgotten the very first time that I tasted a 'Carrie.' I was in my early teens. With all due respect, I think the optimal age for tasting a 'Carrie' for the first time is somewhere around the teen years; everything tastes better, sounds better, looks better...

So, here goes, it looked like a good quality mango at first sight. I noticed the lack of splashy red coloration of other varieties immediately ('Haden'). Everything about the 'cutting with a sharp knife' experience is perfect. I was expecting the standard mango flavor. I put the very first bite ever in my mouth and - woaw - this is not the regular standard mango flavor, what's this? A tiny bit of the regular flavor then a bit more of the 'piney' flavor. Then, it was, woaw, the best colorful way to describe it that comes to mind: this is voodoo, witchcraft taste. In a fraction of a second I was like, what kind of a trip is this? I wasn't sure which way my brain was going to go - hate the flavor - like the flavor - love the flavor, all in a fraction of a second. It was like a flavor experience that hit and kicked me at the same time. Then, the next bite was reminiscent of the first one but with a definite different 'spicy' flavor, and I was like, 'what the heck!' And then came my final, definite reaction: I had made my mind up, this was not a regular tasting mango, this was definitely a witchcraft/voodoo flavored mango and I was hooked! This is definitely not a 'goody two shoes' taste, or 'Dorothy in la la land' taste... The flavor was synonymous with dangerous/scary activities like 'cave diving..,' It was a dangerous, adventurous taste. Right there and then I knew I was addicted. It was almost as if I valued this mango's taste to be one of the highest quality. The weird thing is that I started not being sure if I liked the taste at the first bite and wound up later after finishing the mango, completely and forever addicted to this variety.

In conclusion, this mango has one of those tastes that it is an acquired, addictive, taste. It's a taste that grabs you, possesses you. In hindsight, I realize that I was very fortunate. My first 'Carrie' mango was removed/picked from the tree with perfect timing, at the point/moment when there was a subtle but definite change in the coloration, that indicated that the mango was ready for the picking. Perhaps this correct timing of picking the mango off the tree is what's important in order to truly appreciate/experience the exquisite taste of the 'Carrie.' Perhaps incorrectly timing the picking of the 'Carrie' is what has not allowed some to appropriately evaluate this variety. (REF)

--  It is a distinct taset to the flesh and a "piney"/resinous component near the skin that some, or many find off putting.  It is usually a love or hate relationship with the Carrie.  Duncan has a similar component which some describe as an unpleasant taste near the skin.
(REF)

-- For the "American palate" (ie, anglos who've grown up eating apples and pears), the carrie has a tight window of awesomeness, and I'm quite convinced that a good portion of those who report that they dislike it have never tried a carrie in that stage.

The carrie goes from creamy (code word for chalky :-), with a great sweet and tart combo to sweet gelatinous sludge with funky odor and foul aftertaste very quickly. The novice mango eater will wait until the carrie is yellow before eating, but that is a mistake. One should consume the carrie at the very first sign of give. (This does not apply to islanders / latinos, as they often prefer to let it ripen to the point of extreme sweetness.)

Carrie also tend to have a better flavor and consistency (in my opin) if picked green and allowed to ripen indoors. I very rarely find a tree ripened carrie that I like.

It takes some trial and error to get the carrie at the right stage, it does have that strong piney flavor (which is stronger in some years than others), and the flavor can vary from year to year. But overall it's a great mango with many excellent qualities:

 - Incredible flavor and texture when eaten at the right stage
 - Best mango for "processing" (smoothies, ice cream, etc)(REF)
- Mark

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #64 on: September 06, 2015, 05:33:36 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Cogshall

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

--  in SoCal but Cogshall is a small compact grower here in my yard. Taste wise it doesn't come close to Pickering but it's a solid producer. I saw a mature Cogshall in USDA Miami this summer under 12'. I would rate it as a solid second tier mango.(REF)

-- 2.5 year old in the ground slow dwarf grower in Socal I would highly recommended who prefer a 6-7 foot tree in our climate fruit is above average (REF)

-- This 7 year old Cogshall (taken in July) is only about 6.5 ft. tall(REF)

-- Cogshall is a smaller, slow growing tree.(REF)

-- If space is your main concern, I would plant the cogshall. Easy tree to control, good fruit that has a different but not unfamiliar taste compared to Haden. IMO it is better than haden but has a very short shelf life.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- solid producer(REF)

-- Also, I have experienced production issues with Cogshall. It is not nearly as disease resistant as Fairchild.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- My mangos have been ripen early started in later June. 50% of my crop have ripen the others will ripen from now until January In several varieties I've have a second crop. Cogshall is a well adapted mango for SoCal had 28 on my first crop about equal amount in the second.....mango tasting at your house in November ;D(REF)

-- Bill, I believe Cogshall is considered "Mid season"... Mine are just starting to ripen now (June 26), I still have several of them that are still pretty green, maybe another week or so...before they're ready.(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- For me personally, in Florida growing conditions, Cogshall tastes better than Pickering.(REF)

-- Fruit is colorful (nicknamed the Easter Egg mango by some) but has some similar flaor issues as the Glenn.  It ihas a propensity to being mild and having at times a washed out flavor.  Texture is soft too, not Carrie "mush" but still softer than I would prefer.(REF)

-- If I remember correctly, all of my Cogshall colored up when they were ripe even the ones that were in the interior of the tree (just not as fast and not as colorful) as the ones that were getting direct sun. Some other varieties may not color as nice, but all my Cogshall did color up just different intensity...just more colorful on the ones that were on the outside of the tree. To answer your question...

"Will they ripen on the tree? ...Yes, they will ripen on the tree whether they get direct sun or not. You can always try the "feel" test...once they get a little bit of color you can squeeze them gently and if they have some give to them, they should be close to being ripe. Most of mine I waited till they "fell" of the stalk and landed in my wrap. Then I knew they were either ripe or very close to being fully ripe.(REF)
« Last Edit: September 07, 2015, 10:45:46 AM by starch »
- Mark

bsbullie

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #65 on: September 06, 2015, 05:52:15 PM »
You are way over thinking this.  Are you looking for the "perfect " tree (on paper) or a mango that is the right choice for you?
- Rob

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #66 on: September 06, 2015, 06:33:47 PM »
You are way over thinking this.  Are you looking for the "perfect " tree (on paper) or a mango that is the right choice for you?

I am just documenting my research. And I am doing it publicly in case this might be useful to anybody else. There is likely no perfect tree for my application, but there looks like there are several good options. Also, I know that I will be doing a bit of 'veering off the path' being in AZ and so the experiences of FL and CA growers won't necessarily apply (CA is probably more applicable though).

For myself, I am narrowing the list down to:
- Carrie
- Julie
- Pickering
- Venus
- Imam Passand
- Mahachanok

But I am continuing to document my research because maybe someone in FL or CA might have slightly different criteria / taste and might make a different decision.

Just collating data as they say :)
- Mark

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #67 on: September 06, 2015, 06:40:34 PM »
You are way over thinking this.  Are you looking for the "perfect " tree (on paper) or a mango that is the right choice for you?

I am just documenting my research. And I am doing it publicly in case this might be useful to anybody else. There is likely no perfect tree for my application, but there looks like there are several good options. Also, I know that I will be doing a bit of 'veering off the path' being in AZ and so the experiences of FL and CA growers won't necessarily apply (CA is probably more applicable though).

For myself, I am narrowing the list down to:
- Carrie
- Julie
- Pickering
- Venus
- Imam Passand
- Mahachanok

But I am continuing to document my research because maybe someone in FL or CA might have slightly different criteria / taste and might make a different decision.

Just collating data as they say :)

Another aspect to this is that I have room and a hole prepared for one small mango now, I am still re-purposing space in my yard and will be opening up space for 1-2 more small mangoes next year. So even though I will choose one compact mango now, I will be putting in a couple more eventually and I would like to choose mangoes that have differing flavor profiles and ripening times to increase variety and the overall season. Hence the continued research.
- Mark

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #68 on: September 06, 2015, 07:59:01 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Cotton Candy

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Cotton Candy, original tree, planted out in the field in the late nineties, and never pruned, is still under 20 feet. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- Late Season (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Uh oh.  Look out ladies and gentlemen,  put the children in their rooms.  There may be a new sheriff in town.  This mango is a Keitt crossed with Gary.  If you like high acidic levels in your mango read no further.  At first bite you taste a the flavor of a firm but tamed down Gary (no distinct pina colada flavor) and then all hell breaks loose and here comes the flavor of, yes, I am not kidding, the flavor of cotton c andy on through the finish.  I have eaten a few of these and the flavor profile is consistent. (REF)

-- It isn't too often one can legitimately have Cotton Candy for breakfast.  And after eating this mango, I a left wondering if it should be allowed.  This thing is sweet.  Sickly sweet.  Perhaps some alternate names could have been Sucre.  Or The Amputator.  A good looking mango with subtle yellow pink outside, also decent mid sized fruit.  Inside is yellow and, again, mine had slightly gone past its prime.  But in this case, it didn't matter.  First impression were, aroma was positive.  Second thing, it struck me as being very similar in flavour profile go Coconut Cream - excellent.  The knock out punch though is the after taste.  It seemed the closer to th seed I got, the sweeter the mango got.  It is like a mix of Brahm Kai Mea and coconut cream.

I imagine there are some who will not enjoy this mango for being just too sweet.  There are those who cannot imagine a mango that is too sweet.  If so, Cotton Candy may either change your mind or....bethemango of choice for you.

I rate it very highly, top tier.(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 11:12:55 AM by starch »
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #69 on: September 06, 2015, 08:10:50 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Duncan

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

--  its a medium sized grower, only moderately or semi-vigorous and can be controlled relatively easily (think 'Glenn' in that regard) (REF)

-- While if left unpruned to grow naturally, the tree will get large like most mangoes.  However, if maintained on a good pruning schedule, the tree can be kept quite manageable within the Richard Campbell/Fairchild system.(REF)

-- The tree is a moderate grower but can easily be controlled with pruning.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

--  Its production habits are very good and it has great fungus resistance. Another mango that should have been propagated more than it has been.(REF)

-- I would say the production is excellent, better than Edward or Cushman, and fungus resistance is excellent.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

--  The crops are heavy and generally run from July into early August in a later flowering year(REF)

-- 'Duncan' is Early to Late (Extended Harvest.  Always waite for color break before picking). (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Duncan's flavor to me is like a sort of 'milder' Edward, with some other delicate notes it probably inherited from the Pico cross.. It is quite good. I would not place it in the level of Cushman or Dot strictly in terms of flavor but it certainly ranks well. The best quality of Duncan is the sum of all its qualities really;(REF)

-- I feel the flavor is outstanding and much better than Kent, better than Cushman (I have found Cushman to be a little inconsistent), and every bit as equal to Edward or Dot (though the flavor profile is different than Edward or Dot so it is unfair to truly compare as it is a subjective thing at that point). (REF)

-- I pretty much agree with everything Squam has written.  Looking into the Fairchild mango "bible" it is rated Good to Excellent on the Excellent, Good Fair, Poor scale.  They say it is of unknown parentage with Saigon being one of its parents.  The tree was supposedly patented by David Sturrock  of West Palm Beach.  I know Squam's research has some different info on the lineage of this cultivar. In any case, this is a fiberless, orange fleshed fruit with nice flavor.  In my expereince it can be near the top of the tasting table ratings, but is rarely the blue ribbon winner as against some of the top of the top fruits.  It is overall, very worthwhile growing.  I have it....but did not purchase it.  I won it at a Fairchild Mango Festival in a raffle. My tree was severely broken down by Hurricane Wilma, down to a 4 foot stump with no branches.  It took two years to start producing again, but has produced reliably ever since. (REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 11:25:41 AM by starch »
- Mark

bsbullie

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #70 on: September 06, 2015, 08:17:22 PM »
There areba few AZ growers on here.  Che k with them.  Of what is on your list, i would personally eliminate Julie and Imam Pasand.  Cotton Candy will be an unknown  (it has never been grafted on turpentine rootstock so who knows how it will react and grow) and unless you are going to drive to Florida,  and possibly get lucky depending on the number that may be offered cor sale WHOLESALE,  you may have to wait at least 2 years for it.

I would add Fairchild to your list and possibly Pina Colada and Providence.
- Rob

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #71 on: September 06, 2015, 09:43:13 PM »
There areba few AZ growers on here.  Che k with them.  Of what is on your list, i would personally eliminate Julie and Imam Pasand.  Cotton Candy will be an unknown  (it has never been grafted on turpentine rootstock so who knows how it will react and grow) and unless you are going to drive to Florida,  and possibly get lucky depending on the number that may be offered cor sale WHOLESALE,  you may have to wait at least 2 years for it.

I would add Fairchild to your list and possibly Pina Colada and Providence.

Thanks Rob. Yeah, I have seen posts by AZ mango growers here and on phoenixtropicals.com . A lot of them are growing Manila, Keitt and Lemon Zest (others too, but these are the ones I remember prominently off the top of my head). But all these are big trees left to their own devices. And even with a pruning regimen, I would be sacrificing a lot of productivity by excessive pruning for size control with these trees. I have also seen evidence that Carrie can do really well in Phoenix. And since my constraint is a mango that I can keep small for my particular new planting location without sacrificing production, this is one I am strongly considering. Even with the mixed thoughts on the flavor profile (I happen to like piney/resinous flavors in hops, a nice piney-hopped west coast IPA like Green Flash is one of my faves. So I wonder if that love will transfer to mango flavors too? :) ).

But I will definitely put Fairchild, Pina Colada and Providence in my consideration pile. Thanks for the feedback!
- Mark

Mark in Texas

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #72 on: September 07, 2015, 09:04:30 AM »
Much thanks for your time and research starch. Folks like me who are research freaks appreciate it albeit a bit confusing prone to initiating a lot of "what ifs".  You (and that includes you Rob) are outdoor growers in may be in the "perfect" clime, ya'll have it made.  I have 1-3 choice spots in the greenhouse to choose from so even one "aw shit" is too many for me.  I'm too damn old and stubborn to be a pioneer with this stuff.  :D

Gracias....

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #73 on: September 07, 2015, 09:48:33 AM »
Much thanks for your time and research starch. Folks like me who are research freaks appreciate it albeit a bit confusing prone to initiating a lot of "what ifs".  You (and that includes you Rob) are outdoor growers in may be in the "perfect" clime, ya'll have it made.  I have 1-3 choice spots in the greenhouse to choose from so even one "aw shit" is too many for me.  I'm too damn old and stubborn to be a pioneer with this stuff.  :D

Gracias....

Absolutely Mark! Yes, I am very research minded. If there is information out there on a topic (in this case fruit trees) I want to read up on my options so that I can make an semi-educated decision. There are so many experts and very experienced growers here on TFF that have extremely useful insights on all these trees I am interested in. But it's scattered all over the place (a tree size observation on one thread, a productivity observation on another, etc.). So I was centralizing it so that I could make sense of it, so that I could make a better choice for my situation. And so instead of doing it just for me (say on a personal spreadsheet) I figured that it might be useful to others so that is why I am doing it here in post form.

Glad it is useful, thanks!
- Mark

Mark in Texas

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #74 on: September 07, 2015, 10:05:57 AM »
If the place was set up to do it, this thread should be a sticky.

Thanks

 

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