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Author Topic: Compact Mango Suggestions  (Read 60491 times)

mangomandan

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #75 on: September 07, 2015, 10:16:49 AM »
For me personally, in Florida growing conditions, Cogshall tastes better than Pickering.
But as starch and others have indicated Pickering has especially fine growing habits, with more disease resistance.


Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Cogshall



--  in SoCal but Cogshall is a small compact grower here in my yard. Taste wise it doesn't come close to Pickering but it's a solid producer. I saw a mature Cogshall in USDA Miami this summer under 12'. I would rate it as a solid second tier mango.(REF)



-- Also, I have experienced production issues with Cogshall. It is not nearly as disease resistant as Fairchild.(REF)



Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Fruit is colorful (nicknamed the Easter Egg mango by some) but has some similar flaor issues as the Glenn.  It ihas a propensity to being mild and having at times a washed out flavor.  Texture is soft too, not Carrie "mush" but still softer than I would prefer.(REF)

-- If I remember correctly, all of my Cogshall colored up when they were ripe even the ones that were in the interior of the tree (just not as fast and not as colorful) as the ones that were getting direct sun. Some other varieties may not color as nice, but all my Cogshall did color up just different intensity...just more colorful on the ones that were on the outside of the tree. To answer your question...

"Will they ripen on the tree? ...Yes, they will ripen on the tree whether they get direct sun or not. You can always try the "feel" test...once they get a little bit of color you can squeeze them gently and if they have some give to them, they should be close to being ripe. Most of mine I waited till they "fell" of the stalk and landed in my wrap. Then I knew they were either ripe or very close to being fully ripe.(REF)

Mark in Texas

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #76 on: September 07, 2015, 10:44:57 AM »
Then Cogshall it is.  Being in the hill country west of I-35 our RH is low so shouldn't be a problem with disease pressures. Even with my swamp coolers going the RH is below 60% most times.  Plan to go to high pressure flash nozzles/pump in the future. Hopefully that will increase RH.

bsbullie

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #77 on: September 07, 2015, 11:28:55 AM »
I find Cogshall to be highly variable in flavor, quality and production .   It moreso than not is more simple milder flavor ahd is prone to being watered in flavor.  While the tree is compact,  it would be near the bottom of my list, above possibly only Carrie.
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #78 on: September 07, 2015, 12:26:41 PM »
What a great list! Nice of you to take the time to compile it. I would have loved such a list when I was selecting my trees, I'm sure it will help many new growers in future. I'd add Manilita to the list. There are pics of my tree and fruit here:
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=5816.msg143208;topicseen#msg143208
It is on par with Pickering for size, but more upright in habit. I can easily maintain it productive at 5'. The flavor might not be top tier, but it is my favorite in my yard. Fragrant,  colorful, disease resistant, every fruit ripens perfectly, and while not complex, I like the flavor a lot. A perfect cogshalls will beat it in flavor, but this year I had about 50 manilitas and around 30 cogshalls, and due to inconsistent ripening in the cogshalls, I'd say around 3 were superior, the rest were beat out by the Manilita in flavor this year.

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #79 on: September 07, 2015, 01:08:28 PM »
What a great list! Nice of you to take the time to compile it. I would have loved such a list when I was selecting my trees, I'm sure it will help many new growers in future.

Thanks sunworshiper! I am glad to go to the effort. Like you said, it will likely (hopefully) be useful to new growers in the future who might have similar constraints to mine.

I'd add Manilita to the list. There are pics of my tree and fruit here:
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=5816.msg143208;topicseen#msg143208
It is on par with Pickering for size, but more upright in habit. I can easily maintain it productive at 5'. The flavor might not be top tier, but it is my favorite in my yard. Fragrant,  colorful, disease resistant, every fruit ripens perfectly, and while not complex, I like the flavor a lot. A perfect cogshalls will beat it in flavor, but this year I had about 50 manilitas and around 30 cogshalls, and due to inconsistent ripening in the cogshalls, I'd say around 3 were superior, the rest were beat out by the Manilita in flavor this year.

What a beautiful tree! I will definitely add Manilita to the list, thanks!
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starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #80 on: September 07, 2015, 01:51:18 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Dwarf Hawaiian

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- I think one should add dwarf Hawaiian to this list. The one at Truly Tropical is a compact grower and very productive.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- I think one should add dwarf Hawaiian to this list. The one at Truly Tropical is a compact grower and very productive.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- I am not sure that what I've had was the 'Rapoza'.  An old map of the trees at Trully Tropical shows two Raposa trees, but I later realized that it was the fruits from those trees that Ms Chris was selling as Dwarf Hawaiian.  Whatever they are they are really good, very early AND very long season--- late March to late June, with a few very green fruits for later.(REF)

-- 'Dwarf Hawai'ian' is Very Early and Mid (almost always two harvests, or more); (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

--   I only had a timely one and it had that tang like sizzle to it, sort of like carbonated water - but sweet and aromatic.  The flesh looks stringy but was fine to me.  This is a good mango.(REF)

-- Dwarf Hawaiian continues to please.  What they lack in size, they make up for in earlyness and zippy sweetness. (REF)

--  Dwarf Hawaiian was certainly the best of the early mangoes.  Even slightly over ripe it tasted fine.(REF)

-- 'Dwarf Hawai'ian', supposedly actually originated in Florida, where it was given the non-politically-correct name, "tete-de-nene."
It tastes like a cross between 'Julie' and 'Kent', and those are its probable parents.  Though I don't care for 'Julie', I do like the flavor of 'Dwarf Hawai'ian' pulp very much, and also the flavor of its skin--- together they are very sweet and spicey.(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 10:54:23 PM by starch »
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starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #81 on: September 07, 2015, 01:55:51 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Edgar

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Edgar is a more vigorous grower.  Would be tough to keep small/compact.(REF)

-- C-18 is Edgar.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Edgar, from Zill, also fruits very well as a small tree.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- 'Edgar', supposedly from 'Edward' X 'Gary', and therefore the name, has a long harvest, mainly mid-season, with some early and late.(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Finished eating the  rest of the Edgar and wow, it's SO GOOD  :D   Nice size and the flavor is very sweet, smooth, well-rounded and just wonderful. It's been my #2 most delicious mango eating experience of this summer so far, just below the Maha Chanok.(REF)

-- My first reaction to tasting this Edgar (Edward x Gary) from Walter Zill's in Boynton Beach, FL, was the same as Borat's: "Wowwah weeeewah! Very nice, I like." I cut it when it was still fairly firm. It has the sweetness of a popsicle, the smoothness of an Edward, its creamy as a Candy Corn, and there's a laid back tropical flavor mystique that is delightful. Eating close to the skin there is a beautiful, subdued resinous finish. I would rate this mango as "Excellent" and say that it is truly delicious and high grade. It did not blow my mind in the way in the way I associate with an outstanding mango, but this one is close. (REF)

-- I thought my 2 remaining Edgars would have been very overripe at the time of the sampling but there were not. The black spots on the exterior barely penetrated through the skin and into the flesh. Sweet, fiberless, deep orange flesh. I felt they tasted much better  than the Edgars I sampled earlier last week. And considering how they held up well since purchasing ripe  8 days, maybe some commercial growing potential here (?) with this cv. Very enjoyable.(REF)

-- Edward x Gary = Edgar. This mango was mostly yellow with some olive green towards the bottom and starting to brown on top. This mango was 4in long and weighed 355g. When I cut the mango open it produced a bright yellow-orange flesh and leaked some thin juice. The flesh was fiberless soft and juicy. There was an alright amount of flesh to eat that surrounded a monoembryonic seed. The taste was like canned peaches with an added tangy finish and a resinous taste near the peel.(REF)

-- Edgar - this was said to be the "brother" of Coconut Cream... a supposed Edward Gary cross = EdGar.  A nice mid-size mango with a beautiful pink blush... and a complex, almost "royal" flavor. The tasted reminded me of some mangoes I had in India... but toned down and smoother, more 'Western'.  I knew it was really good because I ate such tiny bites, not looking forward to it being gone. Later, I sliced off the second half and drove to the beach... waded out into the water as the sun set... and slowly nibbled the orange flesh off the skin while looking up at sky. I sadly dropped the peel in the Atlantic ocean, walked back to my car and drove home thinking about finding more mangoes of the same quality. A(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 10:52:54 PM by starch »
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starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #82 on: September 07, 2015, 01:58:47 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Fairchild

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Fairchild seems to be a moderate grower in my yard, at about the same pace as Carrie. Im not sure if this is the universal experience or just my yard. And its a very atrractive tree. No disease issues at all.(REF)

-- I have two Fairchild trees. They grow faster than Nam Doc Mai #4. Medium fast grower. Not an upright grower. More of a low and wide grower. You can always prune to hold them back to smaller size(REF)

-- So Mallika and Beverly and Fairchild are not very compact on their own, but can be made that way every year.(REF)

-- I would classify my Fairchild as a moderate grower.  Maybe slightly below average in canopy growth among all of my cultivars.  Definitely not a Julie, Ice Cream or Pickering......but also not a Valencia Pride either. My tree has a considerable spreading habit and is fairly dense.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- How do you feel about its precociousness, productivity, fruit quality?
Above average on the first two. The fruit is not as sweet as some of the new Zills but who wants just really sweet fruits. Alex-Squam says he has solid demand for Fairchild at his grove.
Note that fruits are on the small side.
The fruits are green then get yellowish three days before ripe.(REF)

-- Fairchild fruits are on the small side and have a nice light taste. Plus the tree is a reliable producer! It won't play games with you.(REF)

-- I can vouch for Fairchild. Good reliable producer. Can be pruned to keep it small. But it is not as compact as Pickering and Julie. Pickering produces fairly soon after planting. Lots of people like the Pickering fruit. In your situation I would go for one of these:(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

? (based on mango reviews it seems like a mid-season ripener?)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- The mangos arent brightly colored and this is good ; less attractive to 2 legged critters....just my limited experience. (REF)

-- I really like Fairchild.  It does have a strong "muskiness" similar to Indian mangoes which is probably why I like it.(REF)

-- Grass flats, the Fairchild is a very good mango, but I didn't find it to be complex or spicy. It had kind of concentrated mango flavor (good thing), but I didn't detect other flavors in it. But it was up against some stiff competition on the complexity scale! I've never had Carrie, so can't comment on that. I have decided on Maha for my yard.  I considered Fairchild - liked it, but the spread out fruiting season and its unique flavor of the Maha made it the winner. I'm going to topwork the Angie. (REF)

-- Fairchild - smelled a bit like celery on the outside, but none of that carried into the fruit flesh. It was a very good mango. No special flavors - just mango. Good sweet tart balance, with the tip being sweet and the stem end having a pleasant tartness. (REF)
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starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #83 on: September 07, 2015, 02:01:01 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Florigon

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Florigon does very well when kept compact.  Gets huge if you don't prune it yearly.(REF)

-- I would not categorize Florigon as a vigorous tree.  The fla or in some years can be excellent and some years seems average.  The fruit is on the smaller side and the tree is also (not like Pickering but somewhat like Beverly).(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Also, saw florigon mentioned above. I have a small tree and it produced a lot of fruit this year. It is early and taste great.  Worth growing. (REF)

-- My own Florigons with some PM issues seem to have fruited fine despite some powdery mildew curling the leaves. I didn't spray them. Looks like Florigon will be one of my best early setters. (REF)

-- In Florida, Florigon is one of the best producing mangoes. It will even produce well during "bad" mango years, like during the woeful 2010 season. Nice having fruit on the tree when most others are bare. Really fungus resistant too.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- Florigon is usually pretty early.(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Our early Florigons were washed out. The later ones were quite good, sweet with a citrus-hint. (REF)

--  Later that weekend, I tried a bunch more mangos and one was Florigon, and I agree that is a middling good but not superior mango flavor. (REF)

-- This florigon was 4in long and weighed 394g, it was a flat orange color with black freckling and a large anthracnose streak. This was another mango which had an oily feel to the outside skin. When I cut open the mango it revealed a deep orange color with hardly any excess juice.  The juice that was present adhered to the flesh and was a syrupy consistency. The flesh was smooth with a consistency somewhere between gelatinous and creamy completely absent of fiber. The sugar content seemed mild and the taste seemed like mild honeydew melon. Overall I thought the flesh was of desert quality but it was not really sweet and lacked any distinct flavor characteristics, maybe this was watered down? Worthy of a second try.(REF)
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starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #84 on: September 07, 2015, 02:03:33 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Honey Kiss

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Honey Kiss shohld be available in a year or so.  Very slow grower. (REF)

-- This Honey Kiss mango is a tree in Walter Zill's grove. It is a dwarf, late season tree....Walter said it has very good lateral branching and makes a nice canopy.  (REF)

-- Definitely not a big tree.  A very compact grower.  I would not say its a dwarf either, maybe along the lines of Carrie in compactness and possibly a tad smaller than Carrie size-wise.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Honey Kiss is precocious and fruits very well as a small tree.(REF)

-- They (Honey Kiss) are all fairly precocious, not so much as Pickering but pretty darn close to it.(REF)

--  It will fruit in clusters much of the time and is a heavy, reliable, bearer. (REF)

-- As Mike said, it bears heavy and in clusters, weighing the branches down to where they weep with the weight of the mangoes.  It doesn't however seem to have the breakage issue that I have seen with Duncan when it is overloaded with fruit.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- This Honey Kiss mango is a tree in Walter Zill's grove. It is a dwarf, late season tree. (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Just got back from Walter Zill's in Boynton and I ate a ripe Honey Kiss drop with my lunch. It was smaller than a fist and what I consider the ideal size for one person. This mango is juicy, it has nice melts-in-your-mouth flesh texture with no fiber I recall. It tastes sweet and mellow, like a honeydew melon and beneath the skin has just a hint of the Lemon Zest / Orange Sherbet flavors.  Very smooth taste  - I did not encounter one funky, tart, resiny, stringy, spicy, or bitter aspect in it. I would rate it as "excellent" and put it in the mild & sweet corner of the tasting table. (REF)

-- This mango I have no information on and eventually I'll call over to get some more info on it. This mango was a yellowing green with a small amount of light red blush at the top and felt soft and ready to eat. It was 3.5in long and weighed 238g. When I cut the top off it revealed a pale orange flesh with very little juice adhering to the flesh. The flesh was firm and fiberless with a few long strings noticeable on flesh direct on the peel. There was not a large amount of flesh to eat as this was a smaller sized mango with a big (what seems to be) polyembrionic seed. The taste was mildly sweet and slightly tangy with a peachy nuance and no resinous taste. (REF)

-- The ones I tired early last year were a little washed out but the late seasons were excellent.(REF)

-- Again, it can be picked mature green but will ripen much better and with peak flavor is left on the tree until it begins to or heavily obtains its yellow/golden base color.  When its allowed to color up on the tree, the texture and flavor will be amazing and a distinct honey taste is present. (REF)

-- Honey Kiss is a Keitt seedling (if it was from one of my posts and it says Kent, that was a typo).  It does not taste like Keitt (or kent for the matter :) ).  It is a very sweet mango, brightly colored, late season and has a distinct honey aroma and taste.  It is not like Nam Doc Mai in any way which many say has a honey flavor.  The Honey Kiss is more complex, more intense flavor and the hone component is distinct as opposed to just being "as sweet as honey" like the NDM.(REF)

« Last Edit: September 08, 2015, 07:45:09 AM by starch »
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zands

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #85 on: September 07, 2015, 02:09:25 PM »
You are doing a yeoman's job for every curious mango grower and Murhalinn (spelling?) should make it a sticky
« Last Edit: September 07, 2015, 02:11:48 PM by zands »

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #86 on: September 07, 2015, 03:05:48 PM »
Thanks zands!
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Mark in Texas

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #87 on: September 07, 2015, 03:30:02 PM »
I find Cogshall to be highly variable in flavor, quality and production .   It moreso than not is more simple milder flavor ahd is prone to being watered in flavor.  While the tree is compact,  it would be near the bottom of my list, above possibly only Carrie.

Well, then Cogshall it isn't.  (crap, here we go again)  ;D

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #88 on: September 07, 2015, 04:49:57 PM »
What a beautiful tree! I will definitely add Manilita to the list, thanks!

Thanks!

starch

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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #89 on: September 07, 2015, 05:41:42 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Imam Passand

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- I have a couple Imam Passand trees growing, and they are slow/low vigor trees for sure.(REF)

-- trailing growth habit and is easily controlled of 8 to 10 ft disease resistant (REF)

-- I have a young growing tree inground and currently flowering. Mines a slow grower and internodal distances seem optimum for compact and bushy growing/ training. Pannicles seems resistance to PM and Anthrac in my yard as well thus far.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Iman Passand I'm still evaluating but seems to do reasonably well in Florida and tastes pretty good.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

?

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- ‘Imam Pasand’ is one of the best mangos of India, ideally suited for dessert, the table and show. The fruit weigh 16 oz or more and are a beautiful smooth oval at maturity. The skin is a dark green, with distinct white highlights over the entire surface. Upon ripening the fruit can attain a deep yellow blush the shoulders and mid-section. The tree has a trailing growth habit and is easily controlled by annual pruning. The properly pruned tree will have a full, spreading canopy of 8 to 10 ft in height and spread. During the fruiting season of June and July, ‘Imam Pasand’ hangs heavy with consistent production. The fruit should be harvested mature green and ripened off the tree at a temperature of 75° to 85° F. Harvesting should occur 2 to 4 weeks before ripening on the tree for the development of the best quality. Properly harvested and ripened fruit have a fiberless, silky flesh with a deep, sweet flavor and distinct citrus overtones. The tree and fruit are tolerant of diseases and require little in the way of special care.(REF)

-- This is the Imam Pasand, a mango that sounds like it should come from the Nawabi culture of the North, but in fact is from the deep South. Unlike other recently available varieties it wasn't developed at a research centre, but unlike most of the older varieties , its origin is not entirely obscure either. It comes from Tiruchirapalli (Trichy) where it is said to have been developed by the family that owns the Thathachariar gardens, a once sprawling estate at Srirangam, the island on the Cauvery, where the city's famous Sri Ranganathaswamy temple is located.

How a mango with such a Muslim-sounding name came from such a Hindu identified place is a mystery. Some have argued that it more likely was developed in the erstwhile Nizam's kingdom, perhaps in Masulipatam in Andhra Pradesh, from where it was taken to Tiruchirapalli. Another argument points to Tiruchirapalli's own years of Muslim rule, after the Deccan sultans seized it from the Vijayanagar empire in 1565.

But further confusing matters is its alternate names of Himayuddin or Humayun Pasand, which suggest a Mughal origin. Whatever its origins, there's no doubting the Imam Pasand's quality. It is a large, not too attractive looking mango, mottled green that lightens to blotched yellow-green as it ripens.

It has a hard stone which you can hear rattle inside . The flesh is a light yellow that looks unripe, and in fact, when you first bite in, there's a sourness that makes you think you've made a mistake. But the flesh is ripely smooth, with little stringiness, and then you realise the sourness is really a citrusy tang that adds a zest to the sweetness that spills over your palate.

A friend's father who grew up near Tiruchirapalli tells me that he's heard the Imam Pasand was a cross between a Banganapalli and a Mulgoa. I don't know if this is scientifically accurate, but in taste terms it makes sense. It has the heft of a Banganapalli, the biggest mango of any quality, and its light yellow flesh, but where that tends towards sweet insipidity, with a chalky undertaste, a Mulgoa-like acid bite rescues it, adding lively interest.(REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #90 on: September 07, 2015, 05:43:44 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Jehangir

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- The Jehangir tree that I saw at Fairchild Farm had an obvious dwarf habit. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- I know Zill has been propagating it. Supposed to be a poor producer in Florida. I'm always skeptical of the performance of mangoes introduced from India here.(REF)

-- This year was promising in terms of production. (REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

?

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- I believe I tried it at Smather's place (Four Fillies farm)  years ago.  I think Crafton said it was introduced to Florida by Frank Smathers.  It was green skinned and almost white fleshed and wasn't very good.  Had some resinous flavor and not overly sweet.  It didn't have fiber but the flesh was firm. It was totally green on the outside.  Now that I look at the Fairchild book, it is rated Fair to Good (on the Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor scale).  That's the same as Tommy Atkins.  I don't rememer the tree as being any different in size than the rest of the trees there.  But, I am sure they were all well pruned. I think "exceptional quality" might not apply to this cultivar. Of course, the fruit I had might have been an aberation, but Crafton didn;t say that it was when we tried it.(REF)

-- Didn't get a chance to ask Richard but I was told it was white fleshed. From Harry's description of it being resinous and you mentioning it's dwarf, it sounds like an excellent tree. I like the stronger 'spicy' flavored mangos and I think a white fleshed one would be cool to have. (REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #91 on: September 07, 2015, 05:46:19 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Julie

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Ohh :-) The other tree is actually a Julie. I updated my post to make it clearer. What's interesting is the drastic difference between the two trees of the same cultivar. And, they are located just 2 miles apart.

Julie is one of the few finicky mango trees that I've experienced. So, even if your well water is alkaline, if you're not growing the Julie, it probably won't matter.(REF)

-- I'll have to recommend Julie. To me it fits all the qualities from a mango you're looking for. It may not be a top tier like Sweet Tart but on a normal day it's pretty darn good and yummy. No need to tip it for it to develop a "busy" shape and since you're in AZ, the drier conditions should discourage disease. My 9 yr old Julie tree is barely 8 ft tall without any height pruning. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- The julie mango is an interesting mango in that it can either be a

Phenomenal mango with high precocity, high productivity, and multiple blooms leading to a long season

  -- OR --

A finicky, unfruitful, disease-prone tree that is difficult to maintain and keep healthy

In talking with Gary Zill about my observations on the Julie, he indicated that the success or failure of growing the Julie depends largely on the soil in which it's grown. When grown in alkaline soil or when irrigated with calcium rich well water, the Julie can be a pain in the neck to grow. But when grown in neutral soil, the Julie is very productive and relatively care-free.(REF)

-- Julie tastes great but is not the most productive cultivar, at least in south florida.  (REF)


-- My 9 yr old Julie tree is barely 8 ft tall without any height pruning. 100-150 mangoes per season for the past 4 years.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- mid (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Yep, that denser flesh is what I would call 'creamy'. There is an offspring of the Julie called a Gary which has even denser/creamier flesh. The Gary was used as the natural pollinator for many of the new Zill mango releases. Personally I much prefer a creamy mango over one that's 'watery'. That's why I'm going so berzerk over all the new Zill releases!(REF)

-- It has a complex, fruity-resinous flavor profile that I'd place in the Caribbean (e.g., Julie/Graham/Bombay) corner of the tasting table.(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 11:18:32 AM by starch »
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #92 on: September 07, 2015, 05:48:22 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Leo #2

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Here in SoCal ... Leo#2 ... are compact slow growers.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

?

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- The Leo #2 smells absolutely amazing and it has great color with yellow as the base and a sunset red blush. There are lenticels, otherwise this fruit can be as beautiful as a Maha Chanok ripened in the sun. The Leo #2 is an excellent tasting fruit with high Brix the last time I tested it. These fruit are not ripe yet but I'll get a Brix reading on them when they ripen up. (REF)

-- I just cut open the Leo#2 and it was soooo sweet. It had a Brix of 21.5% but tasted even sweeter because it lacked a bit of acidity to balance out the sweetness. Both my daughters and my wife loved. I liked it very much but wish it had a bit more acid. This fruit has a small amount of fibers, mostly concentrated around the seed. The flavor is hard to pin but to my palate had hints of Edward with a bit of Vanilla on the back end. Overall a great mango. (REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #93 on: September 07, 2015, 05:50:35 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Mahachanok

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Mahachanok will get larger than Pickering. (REF)

-- I have seen them slow and moderate growers, it seems to vary based on location.   They can probably be kept in the 10 - 12 foot range with proper pruning.  I think you would do better at 15 feet but thats your call. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Pickering will give more fruit as a smaller tree than Mahachanok. (REF)

-- MahaChanok fruits very well as a small tree--- almost as precocious as Pickering.   (REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- Mahachanok is known to have an extended fruiting season.   It is possible to have fruits spanning from as early as mid June through mid August.(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Hi Clay, I'm really bad at describing mango flavors and taste...but here goes...its very sweet, no fiber till you get very close to the seed. The flavor is slightly stronger than my Glenn but not over powering. I prefer it over my Cogshall and I really like Cogshall...it has a little spicy overtones to it...not strong though. All I know is I really enjoy the taste and so does my husband. I too like the shape, very different than the mango varieties I have. These first (4) mangoes from this tree is small...I'm hoping the sizes will be larger next year since I planted it inground...depending on what type of winter we have. Thanks...Good luck to us all this winter that gets the occasional freeze...hope its not a bad one  :-\   

Hi Obet, for me at least when I say a little 'spicy' overtones I definitely do not mean resinous or turpentine...I do not like the flavor of Carrie ( and its due to this "off" herb, medicial flavor and I'm not a fan of it) so when I say it has a little spice what I mean is its not bland or just sugary sweet, it has some nice mild spice (think of a hint of say cinammon,lol)...it has a very nice flavor that I like (very pleasant tasting). I have come to the conclusion I do not like strong and overly spicy...herb, medicinal overtones in mango...just prefer the regular sweet, fiberless mango with a good overall nice flavor with that tropical flavors you get...anything very strong I'm not big fan of...(REF)

-- Maha Chanok - has the most complex and elegant flavor, more subtle than a Sweet Tart(REF)

-- the Maha Chanok...well the Angie has just had its death sentence I think! I let my husband have the first taste, and he made a hilarious face and proclaimed  "holy moly that's the sweetest mango I've ever tasted! Starts kind of coconutty and tart and then explodes with sweetness!" - I was most amused watching him. What did I think? One of the best mangos I've ever had! Very complex flavor, incredible sweetness near the skin, a good balance of sweet and subacid, flesh was firm and smooth with no fiber or mushiness - just outstanding! Not sure I taste cola syrup exactly, but do understand the comparison. There was absolutely no resinous or bitter flavor.  I thought the cut skin had a slightly piney scent, but there was no pine in the flavor. There is a distinctive scent to the fruit overall not unpleasant, fruity with a hint of earthiness, hard to pin down, and mostly stood out to me as smelling different than it tasted. Here's a pic of the fruit(REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #94 on: September 08, 2015, 10:21:29 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Manilita

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- mangageable growth habit(REF)

-- Another thing about Manilita....for a "dwarf" tree, it sure has an upright growth habit.(REF)

-- It is on par with Pickering for size, but more upright in habit. I can easily maintain it productive at 5'.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- It might be a very reliable tree meaning it fruits well each year. Ask Mike Bender(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- early (REF)

-- Manilita is a Early mango from the west coast of México (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- I just tasted my first home grown fruit and I was pleasantly surprised.  It had a very nice flavor and I was really expecting much less based upon other reviews here on the forum.  Is this a blue ribbon winner, a taste sensation?  No....its not, but is very respectable in overall eating experience, and for those that want an early, smaller, colorful skinned fruit that has a very manageable growth habit, this mango is worth the effort, in my humble opinion.(REF)

-- The flavor might not be top tier, but it is my favorite in my yard. Fragrant,  colorful, disease resistant, every fruit ripens perfectly, and while not complex, I like the flavor a lot. A perfect cogshalls will beat it in flavor, but this year I had about 50 manilitas and around 30 cogshalls, and due to inconsistent ripening in the cogshalls, I'd say around 3 were superior, the rest were beat out by the Manilita in flavor this year.(REF)

-- My Manilita may be plain flavor wise, but it is a joy in the garden. Every fruit ripens unblemished and perfect, no uneven ripening, and it requires no spraying. Very easy tree. (REF)

-- The flavor was in my opinion not top tier - not as good as an Edward. But it was quite a bit better than a store bought Honey mango. It is in the same flavor category, sweet and tart, but it has a richer flavor and is distinctly coconutty. It has a bit of pine flavor, but not so much as to be unpleasant. When I bought the tree, nobody had any comments on its flavor, but I purchased it because it is one of the smallest dwarfs and can be maintained very narrow. As you can see, the tree is staying quite small.  Since I like Honey mangos, I'm quite pleased.

My only complaint about it is that it seems prone to fruit split. It set really well - 20 to 30 fruit, most of which grew to the size of small plums. But with all those rains we got a month ago, all but 4 fruit split=( But it ripens early, so many years it will be before we start the summer rains. (REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #95 on: September 08, 2015, 10:24:15 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Nam Doc Mai #4, Nam Doc Mai 4, NDM #4, NDM#4, NDM4

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- nam doc mai is compact(REF)

-- Low spread out shape of Nam Doc Mai #4 when young --3 years. I have been tip pruning it. I have two of them (young) that spread wide like this. The plastic pipe in photo is 63". My older NDM is ball shaped. So the NDM tendency is low, not upward and tall like a Haden or Kent(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Also included is my little NDM#4 (3.5 ft high) putting forth lots of nice fruit for its size.(REF)

-- A regular NDM tree grows more quickly than NDM #4 and the #4 seems to set more fruit. NDM #4 seems to be more prone to fruit splitting and I've seen conjectures like too much fertilizer nitrogen, soil conditions and variable water availability while maturing fruit to explain this.(REF)

-- My observation is consistent with NDM4 being more prone to splitting, but it seems to affect the early crop to a much greater degree. The NDM4 seems to poop out the first crop super early, and 90% of them split. The summer crop seems to fare better.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- NDM - mid (there are some people who have gotten it to produce in the off season (November/December)(REF)

-- A number of varieties will throw off-season bloom, typically southeast Asian descended cultivars but I've had Indian, Egyptian and Florida varieties do it to on rare occasion. Chokanon is the most famous for this but Thai Everbearing does it frequently as well (and tastes much better). Nam Doc Mai and others too. This is irregular though.(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- NDM -nam doc mai is compact but the mango has straight sweet honey taste. I would plant it only if I have the more complex ones that also have tart component. (REF)

-- NDM is just kind of a plain sweet mango.  No complexity. (REF)

--  NDM is a delicious and adding an asian mango , if you dont have one, may be the thing to do. Im not sure why NDM isnt a firat choice other than splitting issues, which may not be a problem in your area (my neighbors tree hasnt had a problem )(REF)

-- NDM is a "basic" sweet mango.  Good for someone who is just looking for that however if you are looking for something more in terms of complexity from an Asian/Thai, look towards a Mahachanok. (REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #96 on: September 08, 2015, 10:26:07 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Neelam

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- It's unfortunate because the trees(Neelam) are nice, dwarfish, precocious and productive even in the interior, and very late season too.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- precocious and bears in bunches (REF)

-- It's unfortunate because the trees(Neelam) are nice, dwarfish, precocious and productive even in the interior, and very late season too.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- late season (REF)

-- It's unfortunate because the trees(Neelam) are nice, dwarfish, precocious and productive even in the interior, and very late season too.(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- I nominate Neelam for the worst-tasting mango.  I've heard its off-flavor described as "carrot."  I'd call it "just plain nasty."  This was another mango where I fell for the Richard Campbell hype without tasting it.  Maybe if you had 50 mango trees, you could include Neelam, but if you only have four trees like me, you definitely don't want Neelam.  I don't care that it's a late-season mango--I'm chopping mine down!(REF)

-- I've never tasted carrot it in. More like smooth, light, spicy sweet with a lil bit of tang. But hey, to each their own :).
For other reasons it quickly fell out of favor with me (small fruit, large seed, seed germinating in ripening mangoes on the tree!!!!)(REF)

-- lol.  This is how I felt about mallika...Just nasty--don't even want to try another one--just not for me.

The neelam had what I describe as a vegetably taste....I almost said I liked them...then the aftertaste hit me, and I took neelam of the list.  I have been called crazy, but I also detect this aftertaste in cushman.  To each his own, but tasting is so important....especially with trees RC has recommended(REF)

-- 'Neelam' is appreciated by those who want SOUR GREEN MANGOS FOR PICKLES, well into late season.(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 10:58:13 PM by starch »
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #97 on: September 08, 2015, 10:29:13 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Peggy

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Here in SoCal ... Peggy ... Are compact slow growers.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Jim, mangofang & Eunice admiring the multi-grafted Peggy mango tree ... Jim calls this Peggy tree "the always reliable"(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- I have a second crop of cogshall, 76, 1 Edward, 10-15 Duncans, 4 ST, a bunch of manga blanc, 10 Peggy recommend this mango as a nice late mangos for you guys, and few other stuff. (REF)

-- In SoCal we have a different schedule. Here is a list of early mangos. Mid-October - November , Peggy(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

--  Peggy brix 23 on ataulfo grafted last year(REF)

-- It seems I had spoken too soon regarding Peggy not having rich flavor.  The 2nd of those two mangoes sat out a week longer, without any sign of breaking down, tasted fantastic.  It was sweeter and whatever acidity the 1st fruit had was not detected at all in this mango.  I dare to venture a turf war in say this mango is better than Pickering ;D

Absolutely worth growing for SoCal, don't know if it's proven elsewhere.(REF)

-- Jim told me that Peggy's is called Ultimate, or something like that, because there is another variety in Florida by the same last name of Winter(20222). The Early Gold we had was a chance seedling of that variety from Captain Bucklew. I will call Jim and confirm. I think both of those mangos are excellent. Like I said, I don't know why they havent been propagated....they are superior mangos in the same category as Dot or Fairchild.(REF)

-- Of the mangoes sampled that day, many of us agreed Peggy was clearly the breadwinner.  Not as rich compared to others I've had, but outstanding flavor nonetheless.  Very sweet with a light sub-acid balance that sits just right, very juicy flavor - does that make any sense?

Monoembryonic seed
Firm flesh
Fiberless
Sweet & nice aroma even before cut open(REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #98 on: September 08, 2015, 10:31:59 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Pickering

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- very compact tree yet good vigor, great production, good looking tree with dense dark green foliage and short internodes, (REF)

--  My Pickering tree has behaved like a dwarf--in the ground almost 4 years and still only six feet tall.  (I love that tree!) (REF)

--  Pickering is the most compact of them all. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Pickering will give more fruit as a smaller tree than Mahachanok. (REF)

-- all fairly precocious, not so much as Pickering but pretty darn close to it.(REF)

--  Pickering produces fairly soon after planting.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- Early (REF)

-- It matures relatively early in mango season. (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Not an eye catching or pretty mango. Would not sell well due to the color alone. Taste-wise, this is the best mango I have eaten this year. The flesh is firm and has an outstanding coconut-pineapple flavor. Reminds me a bit of a good Julie mango but this is much better. How did I wait so many years to grow this? (REF)

-- Noel - have you noticed if you let the Pickering stay on the tree longer than normal and become fully ripe that it loses that pineapple (or hint of tartness) and takes on a stronger coconut (or "tropical") nuance/flavor ?(REF)

-- I picked this one when it was still hard as a rock and it had more coconut flavor with a slight pineapple nuance. I picked one today that was a bit soft so I will let you know if there is any difference. (REF)

-- The Good:  The first was properly ripened Pickering and was one of the best mangoes I have had so far this year.  It was sweet and creamy...it was very good.  The competition included:   Coconut Cream, Edward, Glenn, and Mahachanok (knocked off of the tree by my dog prematurely and counter ripened, not a fair test).  I may be eating my CC under ripe.(REF)

-- MANGO VARIETY PICKERING
By Walter Zill


"Beginning as a chance seedling sprouting in the grove planted by Laurence Zill in Boynton Beach, FL, it first caught my attention about 1980 when I saw about a half dozen fruit being supported by an unusually small plant having a trunk diameter of about one inch, with at total height about four feet, and numerous branches that bore small fruit.  The fruit were not impressive in any other way other than exisitng in abundance on such a tiny first fruiting seedling.  They turned bright yellow when ripe, and were suprisingly firm.  The flavor tasted to me somewhat like Carrie or Julie, and the growth habit known as Sophie Frey.  Animal habits being what they are, I surmise that a seed got transplanted some few feet west of a large fruiting Carrie tree where it germinated in the undercover beneath the limbs of an Irwin tree.  In 1983 a severe freeze caused great damage in the grove, killing back some mango limbs that were up to three inches in diameter, and resulting in nearly every mango leaf on the premises turning brown.  That exception, finding green leaves on that little seedling, caught my undivided attention.  I thought perhaps the plant had more resistance to cold than other mango varieties, but subsequnet seasons have shown damage much like other mangos when the temperature dips below freezing.  Eventually the seedling was transplanted  to where it could demonstrate it qualities.  It grew compactly and fruited heavily, fruit clinging  fairly well on the tree when ripe, with little bruising when they dropped.  When the tree grew larger, and in a season when fewer fruit set, the fruit weighed up to about two pounds, though average normal season weight is near one pound.  There came a time when Dr. Wayne Pickering inquired of me about having a mango named for him.  Since that variety had proven of sufficient worth to merit a good name, I sent a box of fruit from it to him to get his reaction.  When they ripened, and he had fairly sampled them, his response was, "That's my baby!".  So the name "Pickering" stuck.  When fully ripe it's among the sweetest mangos, with a texture sutable for slicing and dicing, and it's fine fibers providing desrable bulk.  As trees were multiplied and put into commercial plantings, it has provem very productive from compact trees.  Many who have become familiar with eating the "Pickering" often specify it for the eating qualities they like. It matures relatively early in mango season." (REF)
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Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #99 on: September 08, 2015, 10:33:48 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Pina Colada

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- At least in my yard the new Zill Pina Colada is a slow, non-vigorous grower. In fact It does not grow fast enough for me! The fruits taste great, an 8.5 out of 10 but are small. Maybe I got a dwarfish pina colada. Maybe others have different experience.(REF)

-- I don't see Pina Colada as being that small in the long run.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- My Pina Colada tree had a full bloom and bore one (1) fruit.  It was unevenly ripened.  I cut off two main branches and am topworking the tree into a more productive variety.(REF)

-- I was optimistic when I planted my Pina Colada mango tree.  It has been in the ground for about two years.  It had a full bloom this year and zero fruit set.  In comparison other trees of the same age have produced over 30 mangos.  I plan on giving Pina Colada another year, but I am doubtful of the tree's ability to be productive in my yard.  In preparation to say farewell, I grafted two scions of a Carrie mango to the trunk of the Pina Colada.  (REF)

-- Patience Grasshopper.   You need to give tgese trees at leadt 5 years.  If this is your thinking, you better get that axe out andbuy a bunch of pine trees.(REF)

-- Those two above photos were a joke. My PC is still small and is slow growing. I had two bland fruits from it last year. This year - a profusion of beautiful panicles that look better than what I see on other mango trees, but no fruits stayed. Might have been raining and fungus hit them.(REF)

-- The Pina Colada was productive when it was 40-14 and mother tree be productive since it has been named Pina Colada.  I have seen the mother tree however I am not at liberty to post any pictures of it.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

?

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- I've only tasted 6-8 Pina Colada mangos over the last few years.  Last week I ate two, one of which was a bit tart for my taste. The other was possibly the finest damn thing I have ever tasted. I would compare it to mango candy, except that no candy could be that good.

I wonder if Patrick's care regimen was as successful with his Pina Colada as it was with Lemon Zest.(REF)

-- It can be very good if left to ripen to the proper stage prior to harvest.  Would I rank it in the tops, don't think so.  Texture is very soft.  Picked to early, it is very chalky and will not have the proper flavor profile it should have.  If space is limited and a factor, I would think hard about planting one.  If space is more on the unlimited side, then stick one in the ground.

As for small mango and big seed, I am also not in the boat.  Its all about the quality first.  Sweet Tart is smaller in size with an obnoxious seed but I will highly recommend it because of its flavor.  I would rather eat two amazing mangoes than one average mango just based on flesh to seed ratio.(REF)

-- I ate my first Pina Colada fruit yesterday. It was a bit tart similar to Sweet and tart mango. Did not taste like a pina colada cocktail. My tree is slow growing about 5.5 ft tall and the fruits are small. I give it a high rating but its is based on just one fruit.(REF)

-- Same as Mr Clean, my Pina Colada is a slow and frustrating grower. Easily the worst grower of my new Zills which are also LZ and ST (Sweet Tart). My pina colada also having a bizarrely wide diameter at the base at the graft. Also having a branching out that is 50% of optimum. For comparison I have another grafted tree next to it, planted at same time, that is growing 3 times better. I will post photos.

I hope my pina colada is not on some kind of dwarfing rootstock. Doubtful that it is on a Zill experimental dwarfing rootstock but I wonder.....

pina colada had a spectacular bloom this spring but held no fruits. Hopefully this big bloom means some fruit for 2015. But with such slow growth I hope I have the future orientation to remove all 2015 fruits except one. On iffy trees there is a low anxiety, I am always thinking/wondering ahead about what it will do next year. Anxiety about wasted space in my non-infinite size yard because I do have non-mango trees in pots that need to be in ground but I lack the space. Make that wasted in ground growth time too for these deserving but presently potted fruit trees.

BTW I think it is always good idea to have an army reserve of "new soldiers" growing in pots in case a fruit tree has a disaster or tastes awful. If you never plant them you can always sell them. I recently sold a muscadine grape I was waiting to plant that had great new growth on it simply because four months ago I stepped it up from the original one gallon to a three gallon pot. Thus the buyer has a better head start, She bought it to have grape vines covering part of a garden gazebo, to cool it in summer.

Anyone know when Pina Colada fruits tend to come in? Mid-season or outside mid-season?(REF)
- Mark

 

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