Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Compact Mango Suggestions  (Read 60478 times)

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #100 on: September 08, 2015, 10:36:12 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Providence

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Providence seems to have a similar growth habit to Fairchild.  From the various treees I have seen, it is compact and well shaped.(REF)

-- It has much slower growing habit though Walter would not call it a dwarf by any means.(REF)

-- Tree seems to be a compact grower (not saying it is a dwarf but a compact growth habit.  It is not a vigorous grower and I dont feel it will make a large tree when fully mature).(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- This is a late-season mango, that gets very large, on  par with a 'Kent'  if not better..(REF)

-- Berto, the last one I got from Walter was at the end of the first week in August...he still had more hanging on the tree and was keeping them for himself as he really likes these...they do need to be picked at the correct time, a little green I believe and be aloud to ripen up for up to a week maybe more as far as I remember..(REF)

-- (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- The providence I had from Walter's last summer was outstanding!  Huge fruit, and it ripened evenly--a good tart/sweet ratio, and good fiberless texture IIRC.  Ordered a tree shortly thereafter. (REF)

-- To me Providence blows firchild away in terms of flavor, but I love a mango that has a tart component to balance the sweet.  It is also a much bigger mango than fairchild.  The one I had from walter's last summer was big enough to eat for a few days.  Very tasty!(REF)

-- Does it taste better, that is subjective.  Both are very good to excellent however two totally different profiles.  Fairchild is an overall very sweet mango with very little to no level of "tartness"/acidity  while Providence has a great balance between sweet and acid.  The longer Providence is left on the tree the more sweetness it takes on.  It can also be eaten green.(REF)

-- Providence is a large mango, similar in size to a large Keitt.  It can be picked mature green or with some color, tastes best when picked with some color however it may have some issues if left on the tree too long.  Flavor, to me, is like a perfectly ripe Kent crossed with a perfectly ripe Keitt.(REF)
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #101 on: September 08, 2015, 10:38:11 AM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Rosa

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Rosa, from Brazil, does well kept compact.  (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- early (REF)

-- 'Rosa' season is still on (comment made on Apr 27), but will be finished in about a week.(REF)

-- 'Rosa' is Very Early and Early (sometimes into mid--- extended harvest); (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- ROSA MANGO, also called ROSA OF BAHIA or ROSA OF PERNAMBUCO! Is a traditional Brazilian variety, very early cultivar and is harvested before Tommy Atkins, Very good flavor and aroma. It is totally resistant to Fusarium (malformation).(REF)

-- I like 'Rosa' a lot, because I grew up eating it in northern Brazil, and because I like really strong-tasting mangos.(REF)

-- Never had, nor even heard of Pope or Excel.  I did have a chance to taste (thanks to Murahilin) the Rosa, Tess and Hawaiian Dwarf.  Since these were the first mangoes of the season, not purchased from the store, they enjoy the glow of that status and get some additional points  for being so early. Kinda like my uncle who always said I was his favorite (but really only) nephew.

All of these mangoes fall into the category, for me, as great, when there are no other mangoes around, but would never even be given a thought during the regular mango season. My least favorite was Hawaiian Dwarf.  It was small and somewhat firm and predominantly green on the outside.  I wondered if it was even ripe from its exterior feeling and look.  However, inside it was clear that it was ripe. It had been refrigerated.  So that could have affected its overall eating quality. I liked the other two more, but neither had any really superlative qualities.  I did try eating the skin with the Rosa as was suggested.  That did impart a small amount of resinous twang that Har inidcates that he refers in his mangoes. For me, the skin is a bit too tough to really give me any enjoyment in the eating of the otherwise softer, succulent mango flesh. I will not be making a habit of eating the skin on this or any other mango in all probability.  But, as Har indicated, there is no biterness in the Rosa skin....which I will be taking his word is different than what you get when you eat the skin of other mangoes.

On the early mango front, I forgot another of my very advanced cultivars.  Its the Kau Dwarf out of Hawaii. Its a red skinned cultivar that I thonk has some commercial promise here.  As I recall now, it has been the first to fruit (after Rosigold when it fruits) in previous years.
(REF)

--
'Rosa' is very firm, moderately fibrous, sweet-tart and very resinous if you eat the skin with the pulp--- delicious, with none of the bitterness found in the skins of most other varieties.(REF)

-- Rosa is similar to Palmer mango in taste!(My opinion) (REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 11:23:24 AM by starch »
- Mark

JF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6529
  • North OC California Zone 10B/America Tropical 13A
    • 90631/97000
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #102 on: September 08, 2015, 10:45:24 AM »
Thomson is another California variety small to medium tree. The fruit is small fiberless and lemony sweet. It's a mid to late season fruit in SoCal October to December

Delvi83

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 402
    • Italy
    • View Profile
    • Il Gusto della Natura
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #103 on: September 08, 2015, 11:18:57 AM »
How tall can they become?

JF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6529
  • North OC California Zone 10B/America Tropical 13A
    • 90631/97000
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #104 on: September 08, 2015, 12:47:34 PM »
15-20' depends on the rootstock but it's hard to find a better tasting mango in November December. 

johnb51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2852
    • USA Coconut Creek, FL Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #105 on: September 08, 2015, 01:13:23 PM »
Thomson is another California variety small to medium tree. The fruit is small fiberless and lemony sweet. It's a mid to late season fruit in SoCal October to December

Thomson, Villa Senor, Peggy, Leo#2--I'm very curious about these California varieties.  Where were they developed, by whom, and from what parents?
John

JF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6529
  • North OC California Zone 10B/America Tropical 13A
    • 90631/97000
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #106 on: September 08, 2015, 01:22:22 PM »
Thomson is another California variety small to medium tree. The fruit is small fiberless and lemony sweet. It's a mid to late season fruit in SoCal October to December


Thomson, Villa Senor, Peggy, Leo#2--I'm very curious about these California varieties.  Where were they developed, by whom, and from what parents?


here is some info from CRFG http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/mango.html

Leo Manual is a legend here in Socal he has a handful of great varieties that he's develop for years.... here is a write up on him and Jim

http://www.utsandiego.com/uniontrib/20070805/news_lz1hs05mango.html
 
« Last Edit: September 08, 2015, 01:24:49 PM by JF »

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #107 on: September 08, 2015, 01:22:51 PM »
Thomson is another California variety small to medium tree. The fruit is small fiberless and lemony sweet. It's a mid to late season fruit in SoCal October to December

Added to the list, thanks!
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #108 on: September 08, 2015, 03:27:46 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Rosigold

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Based on my limited experience i would add Rosigold to the list. Mine is about 8 feet tall and its growth is pretty compact.(REF)

-- has a dwarf habit(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

--  It's highly productive, precocious,(REF)

--  I have one that is about 3 feet tall and loaded with fruit.  (REF)

-- (On the subject of Pickering vs. Rosigold) From my experience, there is no comparison between the two as far as production and disease resistance.  Pickering wins hands down.  At my house, without spraying heavily, multiple blooming Rosigold will not mature many, if any fruits.  Even with spraying the Rosigold, while not having to spray the Pickering, I think Pickering is slightly better in overall flavor,  Of course, that is subjective and as we always say....taste before deciding.(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- I would term the 'regular season' as typically beginning in March for the earliest stuff along the coastal regions(Rosigold, Rosa, Edward, etc) (REF)

-- I'll take it! This to me is definite proof that Rosigold can produce ripe/mature fruit in February, thank you mangomandan for the unexpected good news.(REF)

-- My 'Rosigold' mango has been consistently fruiting in the first few days of ..March(REF)

-- Although Rosigold is consistently the one of the earliest, if not the earliest mango maturing at my place, it is most usually a March to April event.  It can mature in February but that is not the norm.  So for all you mango season extending enthusiasts......you better get that miracle mango to start "miracling" though out the winter months.  Good luck to you.  I haven't had the benefit of the miracle as of yet.  But then again, its only been about 18 or so years, so I'll continue to be patient. (REF)

-- Here's another tree I really like -- the Rosigold. Year after year, this tree sets 2 crops, one maturing in April and the other maturing in the summer.(REF)

-- (More on Pickering vs. Rosigold) I'd agree with Harry that the Pickering is a better choice. The pickering is an incredible tree. It's a jawdropping sight to see an older pickering with 1000's of bb-sized fruits. However, having fruits in April (a characteristic of the rosigold) is quite awesome. (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- I've eaten a couple Rosigolds this month. The first, very ripe, was just sweet enough to justify eating the whole fruit.

The second, just barely ripe, did taste pretty good, nice blend of sweet and tart.   Maybe not quite as "mangoey" as I'd prefer.(REF)

-- Then was a first season Rosigold. Nice strong flavor (we have had almost no rain on the east coast of florida this summer), but a little disappointing. I did not think it was very sweet. Maybe the ones later will be better.(REF)

--  I have only tried one early rosigold, and found it good, but not great--kinda rubbery and not complex. (REF)

-- During June or July your right Rosigold would be just a decent mango, nothing to write home about...But in April, its an excellent mango thats far better then anything else available. I had my first one of the season yesterday and it was outstanding. It certainly gets bonus points for fruiting in April when its the only mango.  (REF)
« Last Edit: September 08, 2015, 03:29:38 PM by starch »
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #109 on: September 08, 2015, 03:30:37 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Son Pari

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Son Pari and White Pari, both from India, fruit very well as small, compact trees.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- mid and late (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Son Pari is medium large, yellow outside and orangey inside.  This mango has a good turpentine like flavour but is not as rich as a Bombay or other Indian mangoes.  I enjoyed it and certainly had a sharp contrast to Autumn.(REF)

-- Sonpari: Alphonso x Baneshan(REF)

-- A friend in Cali sent me this about the Son pari - The Son Pari mango is from Gujrat western part of India. Similar in climate where Kesar comes from. Son Pari means Golden Angel in Indian so it must be good.  Son Pari is hybrid developed at Navasari university in Gujrat India(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 11:17:59 AM by starch »
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #110 on: September 08, 2015, 03:32:41 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Thomson

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Thomson is another California variety small to medium tree.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- It's a mid to late season fruit in SoCal October to December(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

--  The fruit is small fiberless and lemony sweet. (REF)

-- Found out from and old article that the varieties ;' T-1' and 'Thomson' were seedlings that Paul T. took from Old Mango that was on the property when he bought the place in Vista. That old tree was called Edgehill because his property was at end of Edgehill street at the time. That's very cool that your saving some of those varieties hopefully will grow strong for you!
Joe, there has to be a treasure drove of Mangos down in that area with all those people experimenting with them for all those years back when! Looking through the old F.G. I found out Orton H. Englehart registered a Ortonio avocado witch I had never heard of compared to Creamhart which I have heard of! (REF)

-- Scott, Jim Nitzel told us last year that Leo took cutting from Mr. Thomson and  Colonal Bucklew yards as well as other influential SoCal mango growers. They have quite a large selection that are not publish in the Fruit Gardener. For example, the Giant Rose is a large creamy, sweet, fruity mango  with a peachy taste.(REF)

-- JF - thanks for the Peggy/Ultimate clarification.  You guys speak so highly of Thomson mangoes, I wonder how much flavor improvement from the Manila?  I like Manila but that's because they're always available.(REF)

-- Thomson T-1 mango - according to Leo, Paul Thomson preferred this mango many times over his other commercialized cultivar, Thomson mango.(REF)

-- Thompson-(syn. Thomson Large Seedling)
Origin Vista, Paul Thomson, 1966. Manila seedling, polyembryonic. Tree spreading, vigor dependent upon rootstock. Fruit small to medium, (6-12 oz.), yellow, shape flat, to eight inches. Resists mildew. High fiber under chemical fertilizer regime. Season early, long (September-November), ripens well indoors if picked prematurely. For coast(REF)
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #111 on: September 08, 2015, 03:34:54 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Venus

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Venus is quite good and indeed a small, low vigor tree. Would probably be a good choice.(REF)

-- Venus is a seedling of ZINC.  It look to be a compact grower but as many of the newer varieties,  it is somewhat early to tell for sure.  I am not sure it is as compact as Honey Kiss but its close.  It appears for now that the parent, ZINC is a much more vigorous grower. (REF)

-- You may also want to consider the Venus.  From what I have seen, I don't feel it will be a vigorous grower and I think it can easily be maintained.(REF)

-- Venus seems to have a good structure and not real vigorous, while it is tough to tell as the variety is not that old, Venus looks to have the same or similar growth habit as the Mahachanok.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- In Homestead it has produced quite well and been very precocious. Venus at a minimum produces a larger fruit than Fairchild with a superior flesh-to-seed ratio. Both are excellent. Fairchild appears to be a little more forgiving in terms of when it is harvested and eaten though. (REF)

-- Venus does seem to set fruit young and looks to be a good producer, primarily late season.  (REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- It is late season and the important aspect is that the fruit must be left on the tree until it attains its yellow coloration.   If you pick it green, it does not properly ripen and stays chalky and off tasting. (REF)

--  If Venus is picked early it will not properly ripen.   It is important to allow Venus to colorn up on the tree or it is chalky and a bit off putting.(REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Venus has a lovely flavor - really delicious -  but it also has the same subtle spice element found in Maha Chanok.(REF)

-- I got to try Venus.  The flavor is unique.  At first I called it "perfumey."  But it's actually more like rose or rosewater--at least the ones I sampled from a famous wholesale nursery in Lake Worth.(REF)

-- Venue should be considered as a top choice for two reasons.  It is an excellent mango and it is late season.  It does eem to have a compact growth habit, very good production and fruit are on the larger size (the three best late season mangoes IMO in terms of taste and production are Venus, Honey Kiss and Beverly).(REF)

-- Venus - superior ZINC seedling - yum! (REF)

-- Venus was mostly rich, sweet, funky and cola syrupy. The chalky taste was very faint, if I tasted it closely comparing it to Zinc it was there, but probably wouldn't notice it unless reviewing. If it gets better when more ripe or later in the year then i am looking forward to the next one.Great tasting mango.(REF)
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #112 on: September 08, 2015, 03:39:05 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Villa Seņor, Villa Senor, Villaseņor, Villasenor

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- -- Here in SoCal ... Villa Seņor .. Are compact slow growers.(REF)

-- Villaseņor-Origin Los Angeles, 1950s, Sr. Villaseņor. Tree dwarf, spreading, responds to strong rootstock.  (REF)

-- Wow!! That's the perfect size mango for me...nicely shaped  ...... Gorgeous tree!!(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- .... and look at ALL those mangoes on the tree!! ...(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- Late midseason (Dec Jan).  (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- Villaseņor-Origin Los Angeles, 1950s, Sr. Villaseņor. Tree dwarf, spreading, responds to strong rootstock. Fruit medium, to 12 oz., shape ovate, color greenish yellow, pink blush, flavor mild. Late midseason (Dec Jan). For coast, foothills. (REF)

-- This is a Socal variety, very underrated, nice flavor.(REF)

-- I've grown this mango two blocks from the ocean in south Ocean Beach in San Diego.   Villa Senor is an excellent mild mango, beautiful sweet yummy mango flavor, beautifully strong skin(not a weak skin), beautiful orange flesh, low fiber, no diseases on the fruit, no disease on the leaves.  Light brown new growth.  I grafted two seedlings that I planted from seed from store bought mangos of whatever varieties, with the Villa Senor in the late 1990's.   The seedlings were about 7 years old already, didn't produce any worthwhile fruit as seedlings.   However, in 2009 I had them both taken out in due to redevelopment.  Bonita Creek Nursery has one of them, which they're using for scion propagation.   A super basic easy growing problem free mango with basic beautiful flavor.
Where's the Villa Senor that's in the picture?
Let's get that propagated.  Let's do tissue culture to ramp up production quickly.

And with perhaps our new norm of more heat, "Enjoy The Heat, Grow Mangos"(REF)

-- Mild may be "perfect" for some people.  its all about personal taste.

there will probably never be a "perfect" mango, because of different preferences.  I would rather have a mild, sweet mango that  has a creamy texture, and nice aroma, than an intense variety that is grainy. I like Kent and Glenn which are have been labeled "mild".

and that's another point, mild to one person may be strong for another, I have even seen Keitts described as Mild, I wouldn't call those mild.

and what is it that classifies a variety as mild? just weak flavor, or low acidity? or low aroma? I mean you could have a variety that has good mango flavor, but may be low in acid and aroma, and to some that may be considered mild. then there are those that like that resin turpy flavor, and use that as the scale of what is mild or not.(REF)
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #113 on: September 08, 2015, 03:40:31 PM »
Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: White Pari

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- Son Pari and White Pari, both from India, fruit very well as small, compact trees.(REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

?

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

-- mid and late (REF)

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

-- I agree that the Indian Pari shown in the website is a little weird looking with the pointed end.
But the Pairi/Pari/Paheri should all be the same...according to literature that I have read.

I have been researching the origin of the Pirie mango for some time...since the Hawaiian Pirie (and White Pirie) are my favorite mangos.
The Hawaiian Pirie is a descendant of the Pairi/Paheri of India.
Likewise, the Bombay is also a seedling descendant of the Paheri from India.
So that's why I am so interested to see if MangoFang's Bombay is similar in taste to the Hawaiian Pirie.  To the best of my knowledge, nobody in SoCal other than MangoFang has a Bombay.(REF)

-- The obvious fact that the WORDS "Paheri", "Pari", "Pairi", and "Piri" are linguistically related ("pear" and "pera" may belong there too), does not mean that mangoes bearing those words in their names are the same or similar varieties.  So 'Paheri' (Bombay),
'Son Pari', and 'White Pari', should not be confounded.(REF)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2015, 11:00:18 PM by starch »
- Mark

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #114 on: September 08, 2015, 05:17:40 PM »
NOTE: Mallika is NOT a compact mango, please see the description of the tree size. It is a vigorous cultivar that needs pruning to be maintained at a small height. This is the reason why it was not included in the original list. However it has received several honorable mentions for responding well to tip pruning/training so it's characteristics are listed here. But please be advised that Mallika does not fit the criteria of compact mango

Cultivar Information for the master list of compact mango trees

Cultivar Name: Mallika

Tree Size, Growth Rate, Vigorousness

-- In my experience, Mallika is not a small tree; its actually a fairly vigorous grower. I would even say more than the NDM #4, dwarfing or regular rootstock. For some reason it has been promoted as a 'semi-dwarf' when it is nothing of the sort. Mallika could probably benefit more from being grafted to dwarfing stock than NDM. (REF)

-- So Mallika and Beverly and Fairchild are not very compact on their own, but can be made that way every year.(REF)

--  For a dwarf it's leggy, not well branched(REF)

-- Another mango I'd recommend is Mallika. Though it's a vertical grower like Maha Chanok, it responds very nicely to tip pruning and doesn't develop "droopy" resultant shoots like Coconut Cream and Pickering. (REF)

Productivity and Precociousness

-- Mallika: very nice sweet mango [orange, carrot, papaya tones depending on stage], great production/ disease(REF)

Ripening Time (Location dependent)

Looks like mid-season given commment timestamps

Flavor / Color / Tasting Notes

--  think Mallika fruits can be variable like Neelam. Both are Indian mangoes
I remember a poster here said his mallikas tasted like carrots and he was going to axe the tree.(REF)

-- Dasheri on the other hand gets lots of praise and is touted as the best mango India has. One neighbour even told me that a well ripened Mallika tastes just like it.(REF)

-- I've never had Mallika...I've heard the word "carrot" taste in some of the descriptions. Is it true? I personally wouldn't think I would like a Mango with that flavor in it...but I can't be sure of course till I actually taste one.(REF)

-- I don't detect any "carrot" in Mallika's flavor at all...."honey" is the dominant flavor note but it does have more subtle undertones.(REF)

-- This season is my first experience with attempting to properly ripen a Mallika Mango.  My trees produced about a dozen or so mature fruit, and I have been picking and ripening them for a few weeks.  It has been difficult to determine the correct timing, as they did appear large and mature enough to me beginning in early June.

The first fruit I attempted to ripen did color change to a nice, beautiful yellow.  When I cut it up however, it had almost zero sweetness.  Obviously picked too early.  Then over the past 6 weeks or so, I picked and ripened a number of the fruits.  All were green when picked, and were various stages of yellow when "ripe".  They were good, but not top tier, lacking enough sweetness to stand amongst the top dogs.

Then last friday, July 13th,  Sheehan brought to the tasting table at Harry's 2 beautiful yellow Mallika's.  They actually appeared fake, they were just that perfect looking.  One was tree ripened, and one was picked green and ripened in a bag.  They were both very good, and by far the best Mallika's I had had up to that point.  Top 5 out of 20+ varieties at the table.  Most agreed that the picked green individual tasted better, although some did prefer the tree ripened one.  According to Sheehan's " Brix -o-meter", the picked green one had more sugar content.

Yesterday, I had Seadation over for a mini tasting.  On the table were a fully ripened Khun See,  Nam Doc Mai, Carrie, and Alphonso, and my Mallika that had been picked green on July 5, and ripened in a paper bag for 10 days.  This (one amongst a group of 3) Mallika that I picked was not really yellow.  More of a funky green with a mottled skin.  It had been 10 days since picking, and they just "felt" right.

The result ?  The best Mallika I have ever had.  It was just delicious.  Rich, complex sweet, with hints of citrus and vanilla.  Destroyed the competition, and is burned into my memory as one of the best.(REF)

-- mallika:  sorry, I just don't like mallika, at all!(REF)

-- dear all...,Mallika mango from India is undoubtedly the world's finest mango in taste...(REF)

-- Mallika is a great mango for sure,  but "worlds finest" depends on the person eating the mango,  no mango will ever be, everyone's favorite.  also there are over 1000 varieties of mangoes with new hybrids being introduced all the time,  so even the Mallika may be bred to make it even better. (REF)

-- I will agree 100% that a well ripened Mallika can be as good ss any Zills variety. (REF)

-- I was the poster who said the Mallika tasted like carrots; and they did one year. However, in subsequent years, if they are picked at the right time they are some of the best mangoes I've had. However, they are finicky on when to be picked, and if picked too early/too late can have a carrot taste or fizz grape soda taste (overripe). I would not ax the tree we have. (REF)
« Last Edit: September 23, 2015, 12:05:40 PM by starch »
- Mark

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8622
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #115 on: September 08, 2015, 05:27:44 PM »
Mallika should not be part of this project.  It is in no way a compact tree.
- Rob

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #116 on: September 08, 2015, 06:01:17 PM »
Mallika should not be part of this project.  It is in no way a compact tree.


Rob, I agree with your statement that it is not a compact tree. I have several references in the 'tree size' section that say exactly what you just said. But in the selection process Mallika received several 'honorable mentions' because many note that it does respond well to training. That is why it is listed at the bottom of the main post ( http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=17443.0 ) away from everything else with this caveat.
- Mark

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8622
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #117 on: September 08, 2015, 07:22:22 PM »
Many mangoes respond well to tip pruning/training but that does not make them a compact tree in any manner.  You should limit this thread to true natural compact growers.
- Rob

zands

  • wango_tango_mango_zango
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4100
    • Zone 10b, Florida, USA, 33321
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #118 on: September 08, 2015, 07:42:58 PM »
Many mangoes respond well to tip pruning/training but that does not make them a compact tree in any manner.  You should limit this thread to true natural compact growers.

With all due respect "many mangoes respond well to tip pruning/training" such mangoes should be of interest here because a pruner who has some brains can keep a mango smaller or compact. I am going to guess that upright growers do not fit in this category. I know I am interested.

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8622
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #119 on: September 08, 2015, 09:10:29 PM »
Many mangoes respond well to tip pruning/training but that does not make them a compact tree in any manner.  You should limit this thread to true natural compact growers.

With all due respect "many mangoes respond well to tip pruning/training" such mangoes should be of interest here because a pruner who has some brains can keep a mango smaller or compact. I am going to guess that upright growers do not fit in this category. I know I am interested.

You should know better.  By your thought process, almost every variety would fit into this category less the super vigorous.   This is not the case.  There are many people with brains but that does not mean they can achieve this goal cause they own a pruner, lopper, hand saw and chain saw.

The title of this thread is "Compact Mango Suggestions ", not what can you achieve with a prunerr and saw.

A lot of bad advice is spread on this forum which people read and think they have become well educated with good and proper advice.  I hear people's comments on a regular basis,  not here but in person who say they read it here, and they are way off.   There is a major difference between asking questions to learn and reading bullshit and learning bad habits.
- Rob

Guanabanus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2555
  • SE Palm Beach County, East of I-95, Elevation 18'
    • USA, Florida, Boynton Beach, 33435, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #120 on: September 08, 2015, 09:51:11 PM »
Venus has a strange growth habit, moderately vigorous, very thick branches, which nevertheless weep like willows with the weight of the fruits, and sometimes break completely off.  [In contrast, Keitt wood seems appropriately tough and flexible for its loads of fruit.]   I would like to see what happens with some pruning experiments.
Har

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8622
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #121 on: September 08, 2015, 09:58:40 PM »
Venus has a strange growth habit, moderately vigorous, very thick branches, which nevertheless weep like willows with the weight of the fruits, and sometimes break completely off.  [In contrast, Keitt wood seems appropriately tough and flexible for its loads of fruit.]   I would like to see what happens with some pruning experiments.

Are you bad
sing that on the mother tree or those that gave been nursery grafted? 
- Rob

starch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
  • My brain is like oatmeal
    • Chandler, AZ. zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #122 on: September 08, 2015, 11:34:02 PM »
Many mangoes respond well to tip pruning/training but that does not make them a compact tree in any manner.  You should limit this thread to true natural compact growers.

Rob, I went ahead and added a disclaimer in bold to the Mallika post to make it absolutely clear that it is not a compact grower.
- Mark

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3908
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #123 on: September 09, 2015, 08:15:50 AM »
You should know better.  By your thought process, almost every variety would fit into this category less the super vigorous.   This is not the case.  There are many people with brains but that does not mean they can achieve this goal cause they own a pruner, lopper, hand saw and chain saw.

The title of this thread is "Compact Mango Suggestions ", not what can you achieve with a prunerr and saw.

A lot of bad advice is spread on this forum which people read and think they have become well educated with good and proper advice.  I hear people's comments on a regular basis,  not here but in person who say they read it here, and they are way off.   There is a major difference between asking questions to learn and reading bullshit and learning bad habits.

I'm voting with you.  IMO this thread should concentrate only on those trees that naturally tend to have a compact dwarf forum without human intervention.  A monkey can use a pair of pruning shears.  That's not what this thread is about, or so I thought.

It's my understanding that such materials as Julie and Pickering fit that "naturally dwarf" bill.  I have a Mallika which was touted by PIN as being a dwarf.    Unlike most, I do have a PGR to play with and will use it.  Mallika is leggy, has long internodes unlike say.....Pickering which has very short internodes the latter producing a tree that is dense with foliage and compact.   I'm a newbie at this mango thingie and growing in a greenhouse but so far this is my observation.  I opted out of NDM because of The Herd's parroting that it is semi-dwarf and had to be pruned often.

Again, appreciate starch's work.

Mark 
« Last Edit: September 09, 2015, 09:20:40 AM by Mark in Texas »

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3908
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Compact Mango Suggestions
« Reply #124 on: September 09, 2015, 08:57:48 AM »
Where you sit is what you see.

Mallika should not be part of this project.  It is in no way a compact tree.


Raghu Rajput over at https://www.facebook.com/groups/TXRFG/ may differ with you based on personal experience.  For some it is dwarf...... very dwarf.  On September 4 we had this discussion at a Facebook Texas Tropical Fruit Grower's group and I contested  Raghu's statement that his 6 year old Mallika was only 3' tall.  Apparently it bears 5 or so fruits in the 1 lb. + range every year.  I don't know what he's doing to maintain it at that height....probably would be a heavy yielder at 8'.  Here's the proof:

Mallika is on the far right, Alphonso far left, peach in the center.




Closeup of his Mallika



He lives in the Houston area which gets plenty of rain and heat.

Just a note to keep the jeers about Texas growers at bay.  This Facebook group (which is in no way all inclusive) is well over a thousand strong growing every kind of tropical fruit California and Florida has and perhaps more.  Texas is a big state and the coast from Beaumont down to Brownsville offers thousands of opportunities to grow tropical and sub tropical fruits.  Then there are the greenhouse growers and very passionate ones like the admin who is north of Austin growing and grafting hundreds of very exotic fruits.  The fruit tastings and scion exchanges held often in Houston and Austin are very popular.  There is a large Mango Festival near Brownsville every year.  Lot's of stuff going on in Texas.

Mark
« Last Edit: September 09, 2015, 09:23:26 AM by Mark in Texas »

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers