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Author Topic: First crop of Citrangequats  (Read 2571 times)

manfromyard

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First crop of Citrangequats
« on: September 23, 2015, 12:00:40 AM »
Finally got a first crop of these and I'm stoked that it survived the past 2 winters and has set fruit. Yuzuquat is coming back strong as well. And my zombie Meyer lemon is speeding up from its resurrection.  ;D


Millet

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2015, 03:05:07 PM »
What kind of Citranequat is it?   Thomasville? - Millet

manfromyard

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2015, 04:28:37 PM »
Yes. This one is Thomasville. I know some people complain about the taste, but it's very limeish tasting. I mixed some with rosemary simple syrup and some water, and my wife and her aunt didn't throw up The wife said that it tasted a wee bit unripe though.

I also have an 10/3&4 Citrangequat. in a pot, growing large enouhg to transplant next spring

Citradia

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2015, 09:10:50 PM »
Congratulations! That's great. I wish mine would bloom.


Citradia

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2015, 09:13:19 PM »
Oops that's a pic from June. It's bigger now. I need to take another pic.

Millet

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2015, 09:37:56 PM »
Thomasville Citrangequat (a cross between a Willits citrange with Nagami Kumquat) should be hardy to about 10-F. I think it is the best citrangequat ever developed.  A Thomasville can easily fruit in 4 years from seed.  Tom McClendon states that the tree makes an excellent lime substitute from mid-July onward, but isn't sufficiently sweet to eat out of hand until December.  I've tasted the fruit that was picked during the Christmas season and it was sweet to eat with no off flavors. The larger your tree gets, the better it will be able to fend of f the cold weather.  You have a very nice look tree. - Millet

manfromyard

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2015, 10:19:26 AM »
Citradia: How old is your tree? Mine is about 4 or 5 years old. Got it fro Stan Mckenzie in 2013.

Millet: I'm leaving most of them till Winter to taste them riper as well as try to get some seeds for backup. The green ones have all been seedless. If no seeds develop, I'm going to take some cuttings to try and root just in case...  :-\

Citradia

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2015, 09:23:41 AM »
Mine has seen 3 winters here and I got it from Stan too, so about 4 years old I guess. It froze to the ground winter before last when I had at least two nights of zero degrees all night long and the five foot tall tree was only protected by a cage full of leaves covered in plastic and frost cloth; the swingle and rusk died completely with only leaves packed around them and covered in frost cloth. Thomasville came back from roots, and is my only original tree to survive the polar vortexes without electric heat.

Ilya11

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2015, 03:51:44 AM »
The green ones have all been seedless. If no seeds develop, I'm going to take some cuttings to try and root just in case...  :-\
Thomasville needs  cross pollination with other citrus to produce abundant seeds, although all the resulting seedlings are true of type.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

manfromyard

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2015, 09:13:50 PM »
 :( Thank you Ilya I guess cuttings it is. USDA has literature stating that it roots very easily, so I guess I'll try that.

Citradia

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2015, 07:06:52 AM »
Here's a pic of my Thomasville yesterday.


Millet

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2015, 12:46:22 PM »
Citradia, if you protect your Citrangequat during the winter for the first 3 or 4 years, so that the stems can get some thickness to them, the tree should become more tolerant to the cold.  The thicker the trunk and branches the more cold the tree can take. - Millet

Citradia

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2015, 08:46:20 PM »
Thanks

Delvi83

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2015, 03:51:34 AM »
It's very important that Citrangequat is grafted on Poncirus trifoliata...this enhances its cold-hardiness. When adult it can take 5F and bear fruits the next fall....

When do your fruits ripen?? Fruit should withstand light frost....

mrtexas

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2015, 11:56:28 AM »
Yes. This one is Thomasville. I know some people complain about the taste, but it's very limeish tasting. I mixed some with rosemary simple syrup and some water, and my wife and her aunt didn't throw up The wife said that it tasted a wee bit unripe though.

I also have an 10/3&4 Citrangequat. in a pot, growing large enouhg to transplant next spring

Although edible you won't be smiling when you taste them. In 2000 I bought a 3 gallon with fruit.
When I got home I tasted the fruit and it was the worst tasting citrus I had ever tried, that is until I tried a citrange. I wondered why
any nursery would sell such a tree. Grafted it to satsuma so I could eat the fruit.

Ilya11

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2015, 09:07:43 AM »
Mrtexas,
It is not for the first time I read your opinion on Thomasville.
I wonder if it could be due to the existence of  different clones?
Here in Europe we have a clone that does not have any poncirus off-taste and bitterness.
When green it is acid like lemon, but in May when ripe it is approaching mandarin in taste.
And it is definitely more hardy than satsumas.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Millet

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2015, 01:04:20 PM »
I used to have a Thomasville citrangequat tree. The fruit was not bad tasting if left on the tree until fully mature. I enjoyed plucking a fruit off the tree every now and them as I passed by.  However, the fruit must be left hanging on the tree until your sure they are FULLY mature, If picked early then Mr. Texas is correct.  I replaced the tree some years back, for an other variety, as there is just so much room inside a greenhouse. - Millet

manfromyard

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2015, 01:56:41 PM »
Yes. This one is Thomasville. I know some people complain about the taste, but it's very limeish tasting. I mixed some with rosemary simple syrup and some water, and my wife and her aunt didn't throw up The wife said that it tasted a wee bit unripe though.

I also have an 10/3&4 Citrangequat. in a pot, growing large enouhg to transplant next spring

Although edible you won't be smiling when you taste them. In 2000 I bought a 3 gallon with fruit.
When I got home I tasted the fruit and it was the worst tasting citrus I had ever tried, that is until I tried a citrange. I wondered why
any nursery would sell such a tree. Grafted it to satsuma so I could eat the fruit.

It's definitely no satsuma, but I've tasted worse sour citrus such as Kaffir Lime and Yuzu
I basically use it for cooking and drinks.
Unless I luck out, I doubt it will ever get to the ripe stage in 7B.

Those of us below zone 8 have to take what we can get Stuff like Citrangequats and Ichang lemon are our best shots.

If you can get away with Meyer Lemons, I would definitely take that over a citrangequat, but since I'm half a zone away from in ground Meyers..

lorewren

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2016, 09:19:46 PM »
Is anyone willing to sell Thomasville seeds?  I'd love to give some a try.  I hear they are fairly quick to flower/fruit.

Delvi83

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Re: First crop of Citrangequats
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2016, 04:58:13 PM »
Who said Thomasville has a bad flavour?
In Summer it's more or less like a Lime, in early winter it can be eaten fresh and it's sweet......

I think it's the best tasting Poncirus hybrid.....

 

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