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Author Topic: Pantin Mamey Sapote  (Read 1680 times)

MarinFla

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Pantin Mamey Sapote
« on: June 20, 2012, 03:51:35 PM »
Has anyone successfully fruited a mamey sapote grown in a large container??
I was thinking about trying to grow a Pantin in a 45 gal container but if it will not fruit in a container I guess I will put my efforts in another direction.

bsbullie

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2012, 04:43:32 PM »
Has anyone successfully fruited a mamey sapote grown in a large container??
I was thinking about trying to grow a Pantin in a 45 gal container but if it will not fruit in a container I guess I will put my efforts in another direction.
I have a Lorito fruiting in a 15 gallon.  Excalibur has multiple varieties fruiting in 15 gal and larger.  I have picked and eaten a number of mameys from Excalibur and I don't know if any that are planted in the ground.
- Rob

bsbullie

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2012, 04:52:30 PM »
By the way, I would not just focus on Pantin...while pantin is excellent I would tend to favor the Lorito and recently tasted Viejo over the Pantin in both taste and texture.
- Rob

johnb51

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2012, 06:25:23 PM »
Pace is supposed to have a good flavor also, right?  R. Campbell recommended Lorito to me.  My Viejo in the front yard is looking great--very ornamental at this early stage.
John

bsbullie

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2012, 07:13:49 PM »
Pace is supposed to have a good flavor also, right?  R. Campbell recommended Lorito to me.  My Viejo in the front yard is looking great--very ornamental at this early stage.
To me, Pace comes in 4th of the four varieties mentioned.  There is also an Excalibur mamey that I am hoping to try this year.
- Rob

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2012, 09:23:18 PM »
Pace is supposed to have a good flavor also, right?  R. Campbell recommended Lorito to me.  My Viejo in the front yard is looking great--very ornamental at this early stage.
To me, Pace comes in 4th of the four varieties mentioned.  There is also an Excalibur mamey that I am hoping to try this year.

I agree with you that Pace is at the bottom of the list.   
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2012, 09:53:25 PM »
Really? Seņor Lara recommended the Pace to me, so that is what I got. Oh well, too late for me now! I did hear that Pantin is much slower.
Katie

pj1881 (Patrick)

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2012, 10:39:49 PM »
I made a shake tonight with a Pace and it was out of this world.. No grit, awesome flavor.. Why the bad ratings??

MarinFla

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2012, 09:57:31 AM »
Pace is supposed to have a good flavor also, right?  R. Campbell recommended Lorito to me.  My Viejo in the front yard is looking great--very ornamental at this early stage.
To me, Pace comes in 4th of the four varieties mentioned.  There is also an Excalibur mamey that I am hoping to try this year.

I agree with you that Pace is at the bottom of the list.   
What is at the top of the list?? Lorito?

bsbullie

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2012, 10:21:41 AM »
I made a shake tonight with a Pace and it was out of this world.. No grit, awesome flavor.. Why the bad ratings??
Grit is not a factor but fiber, creaminess and taste are the determining factors that would put Pace at the bottom.
- Rob

bsbullie

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2012, 10:25:08 AM »
Pace is supposed to have a good flavor also, right?  R. Campbell recommended Lorito to me.  My Viejo in the front yard is looking great--very ornamental at this early stage.
To me, Pace comes in 4th of the four varieties mentioned.  There is also an Excalibur mamey that I am hoping to try this year.

I agree with you that Pace is at the bottom of the list.   
What is at the top of the list?? Lorito?
I would put Lorito at the top and from what I tasted last week, Viejo a solid second.  The only problem I see with the Viejo is the fruit size is smaller.
- Rob

Cookie Monster

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2012, 11:46:19 AM »
Interesting. I thought the Pace was superior in flavor even to the Pantin. The flavor of the pace is astounding; it has a sweet caramel flavor. Pablo Lara named the Pace after himself and his wife; the Pa are his first two initials and the Ce are the first two initials of his wife.

The Lara family is to mamey as the Zill family is to mangoes. They are the premier mamey grower here in South Florida. It's hard to ignore the recommendations of Pablo and Julian Lara.

The comment that Julian Lara made about the Viejo is that the flavor is variable. Some years it's sweet and others it's not. There was an FSHS article where the Viejo had the lowest brix of the cultivars tested for one year in particular. Seeing as how this winter was the warmest in umpteen years with only a dozen chill hours, it's likely that this year's Viejo crop was much sweeter than normal.

In addition to the astounding flavor of the pace, it bears outside of mango season. This is significant to me, since during mango season, lots of other fruits tend to rot because there is simply too much fruit for one family to eat in that two month period :-). So, I tend to seek after fruits that bear during other parts of the year.

Precocity is another significant factor here. I have a pantin that's now been in the ground for 6 years and looks to be setting its very first crop, which will be ready 12 months from now. With excellent soil, there's the possibility of getting a crop in a shorter period of time. But in general, it's not known to be quick to bear. The pace is said to be so precocious that it sometimes starts setting fruit in 7 gallon containers (~2 years old).

IFAS has a great article comparing the various cultivars and their attributes.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2012, 11:54:27 AM by Cookie Monster »
Jeff  :-)

MarinFla

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #12 on: June 21, 2012, 12:25:04 PM »
Interesting. I thought the Pace was superior in flavor even to the Pantin. The flavor of the pace is astounding; it has a sweet caramel flavor. Pablo Lara named the Pace after himself and his wife; the Pa are his first two initials and the Ce are the first two initials of his wife.

The Lara family is to mamey as the Zill family is to mangoes. They are the premier mamey grower here in South Florida. It's hard to ignore the recommendations of Pablo and Julian Lara.

The comment that Julian Lara made about the Viejo is that the flavor is variable. Some years it's sweet and others it's not. There was an FSHS article where the Viejo had the lowest brix of the cultivars tested for one year in particular. Seeing as how this winter was the warmest in umpteen years with only a dozen chill hours, it's likely that this year's Viejo crop was much sweeter than normal.

In addition to the astounding flavor of the pace, it bears outside of mango season. This is significant to me, since during mango season, lots of other fruits tend to rot because there is simply too much fruit for one family to eat in that two month period :-). So, I tend to seek after fruits that bear during other parts of the year.

Precocity is another significant factor here. I have a pantin that's now been in the ground for 6 years and looks to be setting its very first crop, which will be ready 12 months from now. With excellent soil, there's the possibility of getting a crop in a shorter period of time. But in general, it's not known to be quick to bear. The pace is said to be so precocious that it sometimes starts setting fruit in 7 gallon containers (~2 years old).

IFAS has a great article comparing the various cultivars and their attributes.

Jeff, Thanks! that's a great article.

bsbullie

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2012, 01:09:43 PM »
Interesting. I thought the Pace was superior in flavor even to the Pantin. The flavor of the pace is astounding; it has a sweet caramel flavor. Pablo Lara named the Pace after himself and his wife; the Pa are his first two initials and the Ce are the first two initials of his wife.

The Lara family is to mamey as the Zill family is to mangoes. They are the premier mamey grower here in South Florida. It's hard to ignore the recommendations of Pablo and Julian Lara.

The comment that Julian Lara made about the Viejo is that the flavor is variable. Some years it's sweet and others it's not. There was an FSHS article where the Viejo had the lowest brix of the cultivars tested for one year in particular. Seeing as how this winter was the warmest in umpteen years with only a dozen chill hours, it's likely that this year's Viejo crop was much sweeter than normal.

In addition to the astounding flavor of the pace, it bears outside of mango season. This is significant to me, since during mango season, lots of other fruits tend to rot because there is simply too much fruit for one family to eat in that two month period :-). So, I tend to seek after fruits that bear during other parts of the year.

Precocity is another significant factor here. I have a pantin that's now been in the ground for 6 years and looks to be setting its very first crop, which will be ready 12 months from now. With excellent soil, there's the possibility of getting a crop in a shorter period of time. But in general, it's not known to be quick to bear. The pace is said to be so precocious that it sometimes starts setting fruit in 7 gallon containers (~2 years old).

IFAS has a great article comparing the various cultivars and their attributes.

A lot of that is good reading but not sure if it is all correct.  I have harvested 5 Viejo within the last two months (and one was left to overripen on the tree by accident) whereas it shows December as the harvest period.  One of the Viejos I picked, which was extremely sweet and complex in flavor, can be confirmed by another forum member it was shared with (mikesid).  Since I had never had a Viejo before I cannot comment if this common as to their quality or whether the previous year's weather played a role.  Does each year's weather play a role in ripening, probably but I am not an expert on this to determine how or to what extent (I can only call 'em like I see 'em :) ).  Also, why is Lorito NOT on the list (hypothetical questions, of course, unless someone on this forum had a hand in compiling and writing the article)?

Also, having someone tout a fruit that they developed and named is great but I feel it must be taken with a certain grain of salt (whether it be Zills, Lara or Excalibur) for varying reasons.

The recommendations I have expressed are based on the fruit I have tasted.  I can not comment on more than that.  As to Pantin, I have had fruit from varying locations in both Miami-Dade and Palm Beach Counties.  Some that I had from a specific commercial "grove" in homestead were not as sweet and flavorful and actually were a little watery. 
- Rob

Cookie Monster

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2012, 02:18:28 PM »
Yes, yes. Those IFAS articles aren't always correct. And there is definitely some variability in terms of opinion.

The University of Puerto Rico did a study on something like 26 mamey sapote cultivars and found that the cultivar with the lowest brix was viejo. But, not everybody (especially gringos) takes brix level into account. So Julian's complaint about low sugar content seems to be accurate.

The argument of nurseries promoting products bearing their name certainly warrants consideration. However, what's odd in this case is the fact that Lara Farms doesn't promote nor propagate the only mamey cultivar which bears their name (ie, the 'Lara'), despite the high recommendation given by IFAS (Dr Crane?). I doubt that many people even knew the origin of the name Pace. I had to ask Julian to find out.

A lot of that is good reading but not sure if it is all correct.  I have harvested 5 Viejo within the last two months (and one was left to overripen on the tree by accident) whereas it shows December as the harvest period.  One of the Viejos I picked, which was extremely sweet and complex in flavor, can be confirmed by another forum member it was shared with (mikesid).  Since I had never had a Viejo before I cannot comment if this common as to their quality or whether the previous year's weather played a role.  Does each year's weather play a role in ripening, probably but I am not an expert on this to determine how or to what extent (I can only call 'em like I see 'em :) ).  Also, why is Lorito NOT on the list (hypothetical questions, of course, unless someone on this forum had a hand in compiling and writing the article)?

Also, having someone tout a fruit that they developed and named is great but I feel it must be taken with a certain grain of salt (whether it be Zills, Lara or Excalibur) for varying reasons.

The recommendations I have expressed are based on the fruit I have tasted.  I can not comment on more than that.  As to Pantin, I have had fruit from varying locations in both Miami-Dade and Palm Beach Counties.  Some that I had from a specific commercial "grove" in homestead were not as sweet and flavorful and actually were a little watery.
Jeff  :-)

pj1881 (Patrick)

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #15 on: June 21, 2012, 02:35:00 PM »
Had another Pace shake at my lunch break today.. Must say I like it better than the others I brought home from Homestead last weekend.

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Re: Pantin Mamey Sapote
« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2012, 02:48:08 PM »
Yesterday I ate a mamey I bought at the Redlands festival last weekend and it was AMAZING. I wish I had asked which variety it was--it was at the entry tent with all the fruit for sale...anyone know what it was?

I ended up going with the Pace for my tree after research and talks with nurserymen, for all the reasons Jeff listed.
Katie

 

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