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Author Topic: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?  (Read 1177 times)

Geppo

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PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« on: September 28, 2015, 11:51:10 AM »
I have found that Papayas are more productive and tend to be more stable when they are planted by just the seeds and left to grow as opposed to transplanting them from seedlings. They don't like to be moved it seems. The plants that I have transplanted end up weaker and bore less fruits.

Anyone with that experience and maybe an explanation?

From the sea

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2015, 02:13:40 PM »
They do not like having their roots messed with. I think it makes them susceptible to root rot.   

Geppo

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2015, 02:30:31 PM »
Here are a few pictures of what i put in the ground from seeds


















ben mango

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2015, 04:37:11 PM »
this topic may also be relevant to other fruits. possible candidate would be durian, but it would be hard to do a side by side comparison that would be accurate. I like the idea of direct seeding fruit
« Last Edit: September 28, 2015, 04:38:47 PM by ben mango »

buddyguygreen

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2015, 04:57:07 PM »
I also have trouble with transplanted papayas, when left alone they do a lot better but transplanted it takes a year or 2 before they are as good as the ones that haven't been moved.

carcarlo

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2015, 05:40:49 PM »
Hi guys, I agreed the transplanting is some times hard on the plants, but they recuperate, look at this 25 footer, it was transplanted and it took off like a weed.
Carlos O


greenman62

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2015, 05:56:52 PM »
they certainly "can" do well.
i have 2 large trees in ground in my backyard
one was 3ft tall when planted
the other was planted from seed at the same time in-situ

the seed-grown is much larger, maybe because of the location
but, it seems like it took forever for the transplant to get going
once it did, it was OK.
i was thinking soil microbes/fungi may have something to do with it

Don

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2015, 08:38:16 PM »
Found the same with chillis, I planted out ten Trinidad Scorpion seeds in a big pot of cow manure and soil and once the seeds were an inch tall I carefully removed eight of them and put into new pots with same soil and paid special attention to not disturb roots. Ones I left alone grew to over a foot and the others I transplanted stayed around 4 inches tall. Growth difference was very remarkable. All looked after the same. Just don't like being tampered with.
Don

JeffDM

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Re: PAPAYA from Seeds or Transplanted?
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2015, 03:04:43 PM »
A lot of my papaya plants didn't seem to mind the move from pots to ground planting and have thrived in various locations around my back and front yards.
Some have even grown to the level of becoming shade plants.

 

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