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Author Topic: Atemoya Disaster!  (Read 7002 times)

Mr. Clean

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #25 on: June 28, 2012, 10:52:16 PM »
I am sorry about the breakage.  I worry about that with my trees.
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CoPlantNut

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #26 on: June 29, 2012, 12:52:15 AM »
Using less Nitrogen and more Potassium and soluble Silicate, would also improve hardiness.  If you don't already have a lot of Calcium in your soil, add that too.

Guanabanus, interesting to see you recommend soluble silicate.  I experimented with it about 4 years ago and saw marginal benefits for wind and low-humidity resistance and have since added it to my normal fertilizer regimen, but only for containerized plants.  I assume since you're recommending it that you've seen improvements in plant "sturdiness" with it?

It seemed to prove itself most for me when hardening off plants to spend the summer outside after being grown in indoor conditions, but other than that I didn't notice a big difference in the 6 months I ran my experiment (giving some plants the silicate but not others); still, it didn't seem to cause problems with anything as long as I adjusted the PH properly (silicates tend to be alkaline).

   Kevin

Guanabanus

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #27 on: July 01, 2012, 12:06:11 AM »
I have read several technical papers about silicate fertilizers, but I have not done any comparison experiments.  So its theoretical yet with me.  Thank you for the description of your experience.
Har

Guanabanus

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #28 on: July 01, 2012, 12:17:09 AM »
New growth tends to be too long and whip-like and way too unhardened.  If this season's new growth on the atemoya is six feet or more, you can prune it back to 4-5 feet, and then remove two leaves, starting two leaves back from the cut.  This will produce new lateral growth, usually with flowers, and the pruned back new growth will harden up and thicken.
Har

sunworshiper

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2015, 11:14:04 AM »
Thought I'd post an update. This tree recovered well, held a couple fruits last year, and has thickened up considerably. I pruned it hard this spring (branches to about 24"), and it has grown like mad and is holding a nice crop. I had no luck with wooden stakes - rot too fast and snap at soil level. But a galvanized pipe works great! To keep the cut edge of the pipe from marring the trunk, I put a wad of bubble paper over it and duct tape it on. This tree is strong enough that after I harvest the fruit, I'll remove the stake this season. Here's a pic:



AlexRF

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2015, 03:50:28 PM »



The soft velcro ties work well in storms and have lots of give.I buy the coils and chop to the length I need.They are easily removable and re-usable


We do the same first 2-3 years, than use this 1-2 yers:


Even if the wind dont broke the tree, bark may crack near the ground. Stretching is a must early years.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2015, 03:55:32 PM by AlexRF »
YES WE SCAN NEW TROPICAL FRUITS

Bob407

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #31 on: July 25, 2015, 07:08:19 PM »
Your vigilance has paid off, looks nice.
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po0dingles

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #32 on: July 25, 2015, 09:22:05 PM »
thanks for updating! I like seeing what you can expect from 3 years of growth.

sunworshiper

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #33 on: July 26, 2015, 10:00:18 AM »
The Velcro ties are a neat idea. I like that they can be adjusted without needing to get out a pair of scissors.

Poodingles - I'm sure your tree will branch out nicely once you top. The key seems to be lots of fertilizer, they are heavy feeders. easy to tell when they need more - the terminal leaves start coming out light yellow and not darkening up. When that happens, time to fertilize. The underfertilized leaves won't green up, but the next set will come out the right color.

Seanny

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #34 on: August 11, 2018, 12:02:10 AM »
If this season's new growth on the atemoya is six feet or more, you can prune it back to 4-5 feet, and then remove two leaves, starting two leaves back from the cut.

I've experimented with removing leaves from different positions from cut. I've not come up with a good method.

What's the reason for skipping the first 2 leaves after cut?

TnTrobbie

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #35 on: August 11, 2018, 01:06:45 PM »
Im wondering, how did the atemoya do this past winter in your zone (9b)?
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sunworshiper

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #36 on: August 12, 2018, 03:54:02 PM »
Did great in the cold - I put c9 lights on the trunk and no other protection - no damage. I was surprised in previous years I've put a hoop house over it, but didn't have time this last winter. Seeing how well it did, I will only use the hoop house if a hard freeze is expected.

Have had much more damage from wind (Irma broke branches) and raccoons trying to climb on branches to get the fruit. I've left the galvanized pipe in place. I only tie the tree to it during hurricanes - definitely helped - Irma took off one big branch and some smaller ones, but the trunk was undamaged.

TnTrobbie

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #37 on: August 12, 2018, 04:40:59 PM »
Thank you for the feedback. There is some hope for my 9B property :D.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)
F*ck squirrels
and deers

Coach62

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Re: Atemoya Disaster!
« Reply #38 on: August 13, 2018, 08:23:09 AM »
Thanks for all the great information on how people stake trees. I have have had bad luck with tying a tree in one spot, as bsbullie explained, it can cause the tree to snap at the tie point (happened on a hong kong orchid for me).

With this tree, the fault is with the material used for the ties. I use raffia because it will break rather than girdle a tree so I don't have to worry about tying a tree tightly and then not loosening it soon enough. However, I think I need to switch to that stretchy plastic as the tie material. The raffia weakens when it is wet and although this particular tree was tied in at least 10 places, all broke. The plastic would not have this problem. This tree was small enough that the stake was not in danger of pulling over (and didn't - it was still standing after the tree broke). However, on more top heavy trees, I will stake them like this, then add 3 tie down lines to secure the stake. Here's an example:



This peach tree nearly got knocked over by high winds last year (its first year in ground). This staking system stabilized it, and this year it was productive and is strong enough not to need a stake.

I have heard with atemoyas that they grow vigorously when very young, then do not grow much again. Is this true? Just curious as I think about how I will shape new growth...


I use the stretchy plastic, it is pretty strong. I do check mine about once a month and I donít tie them very tightly. I had to right a few larger trees post Irma and I used lawn chair webbing around Jute tied back to a steel fence post, but as I said these were larger mature trees.

 

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