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Author Topic: Good Matisia  (Read 3141 times)

Mike T

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Good Matisia
« on: March 06, 2015, 03:32:21 AM »
During the 1970s the 5 best Matisia that researchers could find in an area from Colombia to Panama were grown at the Kamerunga Research Station Cairns with a view to commercialize the best. They were given code names starting with DCA and information was recorded.Rare fruit enthusiasts had already brought in selections.It fell apart, the information was lost and they were never commercialized.
Some may remember past pix I posted of types with various characteristics that I thought were the better types I stumbled across.


Here is one of those triple the usual 400g to 500g size with great internal qualities as well.

Today I stumbled across the little sweet type I have shown before and a big (1700g) type that is flattened.There seems to be very few around this year and I suspect they are slowly disappearing in my area.





Mike T

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2015, 03:45:11 AM »
Oh yeah I will cut them open tomorrow to find out just how good they are.Generally the best ones have high flesh yield, less coarse fiber,a rich melon/mango taste,thin rind and are juicy.Those with a few withered seeds have extra flesh.It appears that the originals are nearly all gone and the Matisia around now are 2nd and 3rd generation from the 1970s stock.It looks like many grown in central and south america in bulk are not the better ones and it makes me wonder why the finest eating ones don't dominate.

Soren

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2015, 03:56:35 AM »
Mike - you mentioned they are slowly disappearing from your area; cut down and replaced with our species I assume? Due to size of tree, taste or climatic factors?
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Mike T

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2015, 04:03:03 AM »
Soren I don't see them as much and I think people don't grow new ones much.People are less familiar with tropical fruit in my area the days.Like many fruit species cyclones wiped put most trees in the main fruit growing areas where farms and collectors are.They don't seem to have been replanted even though like durians,abius and many artocarpus they are worthwhile fruits.

Soren

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2015, 04:12:17 AM »
Soren I don't see them as much and I think people don't grow new ones much.People are less familiar with tropical fruit in my area the days.Like many fruit species cyclones wiped put most trees in the main fruit growing areas where farms and collectors are.They don't seem to have been replanted even though like durians,abius and many artocarpus they are worthwhile fruits.

A bit of all I guess; I look forward to taste them myself when the seedlings are grown ;-)
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

ben mango

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2015, 08:14:18 AM »
they have an excellent taste, reminds me of a mix between pumpkin and cantaloupe, maybe with some mango in there too. very underrated fruit. the flowers on the tree are also really pretty. this is a picture of one we have in hawaii named 'Dulce'. one of my favorite fruits






Finca La Isla

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2015, 10:10:35 AM »
There is good demand for sapote colombiano here.  I had planted several seedlings in the eighties and cut some down because the fruits were dry and/or were high in fiber.  The remaining ones are quite good, they impressed Jim West. 
They are not too difficult to graft.  Another positive is that contrary to many commercial tropical fruits, production every season is totally reliable.
Peter

Ethan

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2015, 12:05:40 PM »
Wow, beautiful fruits!

luc

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2015, 01:48:58 PM »
I also notice the trees and seedlings are tough , not easy to kill , forgot watering or went on vacation for several weeks ....no problem....
Luc Vleeracker
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20 degrees north

HIfarm

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2015, 02:35:28 PM »
Luc, I hope you are right.  I was sick the other week & was a few days late watering & one of my chupa chupa lost all its leaves.  It still looks like the stem is green so I am hoping it is still going to be ok.  The plant is getting a little large for its pot so I think that makes water supply a little more critical.

John

I also notice the trees and seedlings are tough , not easy to kill , forgot watering or went on vacation for several weeks ....no problem....

fruitlovers

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2015, 04:12:39 PM »
Luc, I hope you are right.  I was sick the other week & was a few days late watering & one of my chupa chupa lost all its leaves.  It still looks like the stem is green so I am hoping it is still going to be ok.  The plant is getting a little large for its pot so I think that makes water supply a little more critical.

John

Watch out, rose beetles really love this plant and will totally defoliate it, especially when small. That and Fijian longan seems to be favorite food of rose beetles in Hawaii.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2015, 04:47:18 PM »






Absolutely delicious and these are the 2 best varieties alright.Those with orange rind seem to be better to eat most of the time . The big one is 6 inches in diameter, yes 15cm. I would like to see one from their home range that big.I have another absolute whopper up my sleeve.

fruitlovers

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #12 on: March 06, 2015, 05:14:45 PM »
I'm pretty sure you are wrong and good varieties exist in the home range, especially Colombia. Maybe the best types are not the ones sold in the markets in Colombia. The businesses there also go for large production and keeping quality versus best tasting or even size. But those good selections all originally came from home range....i don't think they were developed in Australia. You yourself already stated how the selection experiments in Australia were all abandoned.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2015, 06:39:38 PM »
Oscar my point was that the best ones from Colombia and nearby places dont seem to be in the markets from what a few people have told me.These selections apparently were hard to find and local connections were needed.The part I don't get is why the better types don't dominate everywhere in their home range  but this goes for quite a few varieties of fruit.I don't believe the ones here are any better than in Colombia it is just that visitors have trouble finding the good ones.

fruitlovers

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2015, 08:58:09 PM »
Oscar my point was that the best ones from Colombia and nearby places dont seem to be in the markets from what a few people have told me.These selections apparently were hard to find and local connections were needed.The part I don't get is why the better types don't dominate everywhere in their home range but this goes for quite a few varieties of fruit.I don't believe the ones here are any better than in Colombia it is just that visitors have trouble finding the good ones.

Yes, you have to take a walk in villages or jungle to find some of the better ones.
Why the best ones don't dominate the market? Same can be asked about any fruit. For example, why does Tommy Atkins mango, one of the worst, dominate the market when there are so many mangoes that are way better?
Oscar

bangkok

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #15 on: March 09, 2015, 07:13:04 AM »
Wow Mike you're so lucky you can pick the fruits from the selecting work the other Aussies have done.

I have seen pics of chupa chupa's on this forum but they didn't look that huge by far.

If they're really that good than it's strange no other members have them. We need more South American members  ;D , oh and Africans as well.




Mike T

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #16 on: March 09, 2015, 08:05:54 AM »
I wouldn't want the efforts of the frontier collectors and growers to go to waste.So much has been lost already.

bangkok

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2015, 09:14:39 AM »
I wouldn't want the efforts of the frontier collectors and growers to go to waste.So much has been lost already.

That's a big shame, your government doesn't know what treasures are in the country. It could be a great tourist attraction to visit the Queensland fruitgardens where they have the best fruit of the world.


stuartdaly88

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2015, 09:19:27 AM »
I wouldn't want the efforts of the frontier collectors and growers to go to waste.So much has been lost already.

Wow Mike T those look absolutely beautiful.
I cant believe how friggin massive they are!!!
It would be very sad for those varieties to just disappear:(
Are you going to plant and graft and/or distribute scions to your compatriots to keep them going!
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

bangkok

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2015, 09:43:16 AM »
Mike needs a sponsor who buys him some land in Asia, Africa, South America where he can plant some demo-fruitgardens.

I guess the Doi Kham Royal farms will be interested in all your findings Mike. Maybe they will even give you a free airpass Thai Air so you can come when you like to plant what you found.

DurianLover

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Re: Good Matisia
« Reply #20 on: December 27, 2015, 09:45:07 AM »
I re-read couple threads on this fruit, and now wondering if everybody taste pumpkin note?  Seems to be dominant flavor note for many.  I certainly did not feel any. For me it was mango, papaya and cantaloupe in equal parts. Has anybody ever had matisia without any "pumpkin" ?

 

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