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Author Topic: Transplanting Melons  (Read 1092 times)

Triloba Tracker

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Transplanting Melons
« on: March 04, 2016, 09:08:39 AM »
Everything I've read about growing melons says they should not be started indoors and transplanted because the roots are very sensitive/fragile.

However, wouldn't using a peat or manure-based pot and simply burying the whole pot (as is recommended of course) mitigate this concern and therefore make this a viable option?

Anyone tried this with success? I know Bonny Plants sells melon seedlings at garden centers (in peat pots, of course)......

nullzero

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Re: Transplanting Melons
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2016, 11:15:33 AM »
Squash and Melons tend to get stunted easily in containers, from my experience. But you should be ok with a biodegradable container option.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Transplanting Melons
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2016, 11:21:50 AM »
Squash and Melons tend to get stunted easily in containers, from my experience. But you should be ok with a biodegradable container option.

Ahhh ok, I see what you mean. I am new to veggie growing so have a lot to learn.
What conditions cause stunting - is it just a matter of the seedlings getting rootbound or is it more about inadequate light and nutrition for heavy-feeder plants (clearly some veggies do well indoors e.g. tomatoes)?

nullzero

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Re: Transplanting Melons
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2016, 06:46:58 PM »
Squash and Melons tend to get stunted easily in containers, from my experience. But you should be ok with a biodegradable container option.

Ahhh ok, I see what you mean. I am new to veggie growing so have a lot to learn.
What conditions cause stunting - is it just a matter of the seedlings getting rootbound or is it more about inadequate light and nutrition for heavy-feeder plants (clearly some veggies do well indoors e.g. tomatoes)?

It seems they slow down growing once the roots hit the edges of the container and start getting cramped. Also they require a lot of light to have healthy growth, so they tend to get leggy pretty easily indoors.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

 

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