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Author Topic: Tamarillo care  (Read 2577 times)

King

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Tamarillo care
« on: April 28, 2016, 12:21:33 AM »


Some tamarillos are showing up on my tree. They start as these tiny green fruits, then grow.  Last year, the tree aborted every single one of these fruits.  Some of the green fruit rotted with black rot , and the rest of the fruit simply disappeared and I couldn't find them under the tree.  Below is my thread on what happened to the tamarillos last year.

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=16449.msg208651#msg208651

How do I keep these fruits on the tree until fall when they are ripe? I'm mulching them more this year with cardboard and newspaper. And I'm making sure they are watered more regularly so the leaves never droop in the summer sun of the Central Valley of California.  Last year, a lot of ants and aphids were on the leaves, so it could have been aphid introduced diseases that caused the tree to abort all the fruit.

fruitlovers

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2016, 12:31:48 AM »
These fruits don't drop when ripe. They have to be cut when turning ripe color: red or orange depending on type.
Suggest you don't water overhead, only on ground. Your fruits probably dropped due to stresss: either water or insect stress.
Oscar

King

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2016, 02:10:22 PM »


Today I look under my tree and find a few fruit that fell off because they were broken at the nodes to the inflorescence.  These nodes connecting the fruit to the inflorescence look very weak, some of them have a brown ring around the node, and it looks like the tree won't hold any fruit at the rate they are falling.

How do I stop this from happening? Is the tree missing some nutrient that would cause this? Is there something I can put on these nodes to strengthen them?
« Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 02:15:51 PM by King »

Delvi83

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2016, 05:15:17 PM »
It might be too young to ripe all fruits....i think you only have to wait that plant will grow well.

gunnar429

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2016, 09:39:18 AM »
Has anyone grown tamarillo in Florida?  Wondering how it handles the humidity.
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

King

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2016, 02:22:03 PM »
Has anyone grown tamarillo in Florida?  Wondering how it handles the humidity.
From all the research I've read on tamarillos, they have some very specific growing conditions. They are native to the Andes mountains, they are a subtropical, not tropical fruit.  They are supposed to like cool to cold nights- and grow best in the highlands of tropical countries, they don't fruit well in the lowlands of India, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

In highland subtropical climates like the Andes region, tamarillos are supposed to flower and fruit ll year round- but in Mediterranean climates, they are supposed to flower in Spring and the fruit matures in the fall and winter.  I'm guessing that the nighttime temperatures of Ft. Lauderdale are too hot to fruit tamarillos.

countryboy1981

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2016, 02:41:07 PM »
I have a few seed grown ones in coastal AL and they hate the heat.  I wouldn't try growing them again.

LivingParadise

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2016, 03:34:56 PM »
The tree might be too young. I would make sure it's getting enough water (but that it's not flooded, of course), try the mulching, spray the tree once every week or two with Neem oil to prevent insect infestation, and consider netting the entire tree if you suspect that animals might be targeting the tree. If the rest of the tree looks healthy but just the fruit are falling, that might be an age thing, and you may have to wait until next year. But probably you can get at least one or two to hold on there this year if the tree's other needs are cared for. (Are you trying to fertilize it? If so, this is not really the time, and sometimes people overdo that trying to help the plant, and it ends up pushing it over the edge. Just give it water, make sure it has enough sun, and if you want to give it any supplementation just give it some light compost or something like vegetable peels that will have to break down over time into the soil, not chemicals and not any huge shot of nutrients that will actually stress it out.)


I have a bunch of seeds recently in the ground, but have not seen them sprout yet, here in extreme SFL. Hoping for a few to sprout that won't mind the conditions we have here.

bsbullie

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2016, 04:22:43 PM »
Julia Morton says it is grown occasionally in Florida. 

She also states:
"The tree tomato is not tropical but subtropical. It flourishes between 5,000 and 10,000 ft (1,525-3,050 m) in Ecuador; between 1,000 and 3,000 ft (305-915 m) in Puerto Rico; 1,000 to 7,500 ft (305-2,288 m) in India. In Haiti it grows and fruits to perfection at 6,000 ft (1,830 m). In cooler climates, it succeeds at lower elevations. It does best where the temperature remains above 50º F (10º C). Frost at 28º F (-2.2º C) kills the small branches and foliage of mature trees but not the largest branches and main stem. The tree will recover if such frosts are not prolonged or frequent. However, seedlings and cuttings are readily killed by frost during their first year"

https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tree_tomato.html

My guess it would not be that happy in Florida.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2016, 06:28:17 PM by bsbullie »
- Rob

King

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2016, 05:49:19 PM »
This tree was started from seed in August 2013, then I planted it outside in February 2014.

I probably did over-fertilize it last year, giving it tomato fertilizer. This year, I'm not going to fertilize it at all, besides natural leaves. I'm mulching it more heavily with cardboard and newspaper, and I'm making sure the ground always stays moist.  Last year, it always had periods during the summer where the leaves would be wilted because of the summer heat, until I gave it some water.

venturabananas

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2016, 08:45:59 PM »
It's been a pretty care free plant for me in coastal Southern California.  Doesn't always set fruit when it flowers, but when it does (like now) it holds them. I don't give it any special care, just weekly watering (or less) and a handful of organic fertilizer every few months or so. It does get aphids and caterpillars occasionally, but I ignore them and they don't do much damage. All in all, it's been an easy species for me. Maybe you're babying it too much. Good luck!

Waterfall

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2016, 12:13:52 AM »
Tamarillos grow really well for me in Sydney, keep them out of the wind and they don't need full sun.






gunnar429

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2016, 09:26:19 AM »
Julia Morton says it is grown occasionally in Florida. 

She also states:
"The tree tomato is not tropical but subtropical. It flourishes between 5,000 and 10,000 ft (1,525-3,050 m) in Ecuador; between 1,000 and 3,000 ft (305-915 m) in Puerto Rico; 1,000 to 7,500 ft (305-2,288 m) in India. In Haiti it grows and fruits to perfection at 6,000 ft (1,830 m). In cooler climates, it succeeds at lower elevations. It does best where the temperature remains above 50º F (10º C). Frost at 28º F (-2.2º C) kills the small branches and foliage of mature trees but not the largest branches and main stem. The tree will recover if such frosts are not prolonged or frequent. However, seedlings and cuttings are readily killed by frost during their first year"

https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tree_tomato.html

My guess it would not be that happy in Florida.

I was thinking that the climates were very different, but then I remember OScar saying he harvested them, and IIRC, his climate is quite wet.  Oscar, how do tamarillos do on your property?
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

bsbullie

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2016, 09:39:37 AM »
Jeff - just from the writing, I would venture to say it would more be an elevation issue as the main problem witb  climate being secondary.
- Rob

fruitlovers

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2016, 05:39:11 AM »
Julia Morton says it is grown occasionally in Florida. 

She also states:
"The tree tomato is not tropical but subtropical. It flourishes between 5,000 and 10,000 ft (1,525-3,050 m) in Ecuador; between 1,000 and 3,000 ft (305-915 m) in Puerto Rico; 1,000 to 7,500 ft (305-2,288 m) in India. In Haiti it grows and fruits to perfection at 6,000 ft (1,830 m). In cooler climates, it succeeds at lower elevations. It does best where the temperature remains above 50º F (10º C). Frost at 28º F (-2.2º C) kills the small branches and foliage of mature trees but not the largest branches and main stem. The tree will recover if such frosts are not prolonged or frequent. However, seedlings and cuttings are readily killed by frost during their first year"

https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tree_tomato.html

My guess it would not be that happy in Florida.

I was thinking that the climates were very different, but then I remember OScar saying he harvested them, and IIRC, his climate is quite wet.  Oscar, how do tamarillos do on your property?
Yeah i grow them and they do fine here. So humidity is not a problem. i think we have higher humidity then you do. But the person who said they are originally sub tropical is correct. They can adapt fine to tropical areas as long as they don't get too much direct intense sunlight. Due to very large leaves the plants dehydrate really fast. So in the tropics they need dappled sunlight. I get good harvests here at 650 ft. elevation. I think i could even grow them at sea level if they got more shade. Our constant rains helps to keep the leaves from drying out. But it's true that the plants are healthier and more productive at above 1000 ft. elevation. They like that constant cloud cover, fog, and cooler temperatures. I think similar is true of the related plants: naranjilla and cocona, both of which i've also grown and fruited fine here.
Oscar

Cassio

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2016, 07:26:54 AM »
I have a red tamarillo in a pot, and it is producing flowers for the first time. We are in the middle of autumn for now. The plant is over two meters high and stay in a place where she receives indirect sun or shadow almost all day. When I put her in full sun, she don´t evolved well. I think she does her best when protected by other trees, receiving indirect or filtered sunlight.

Talking about Tamarillos and his cousins, I would like to have the Solanum sibundoyense. Based upon what I read in this page http://www.naturalhub.com/grow_fruit_type_tamarillo_relative_new_zealand.htm (scroll down the page til almost the bottom), sounds like a good fruit to have in my collection. It is native from a small region of Colombia. Sadly, after to much seek, I don´t found seeds in any place.  :(

« Last Edit: May 11, 2016, 08:47:31 AM by Cassio »

HMelendez

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2016, 07:34:17 AM »
Julia Morton says it is grown occasionally in Florida. 

She also states:
"The tree tomato is not tropical but subtropical. It flourishes between 5,000 and 10,000 ft (1,525-3,050 m) in Ecuador; between 1,000 and 3,000 ft (305-915 m) in Puerto Rico; 1,000 to 7,500 ft (305-2,288 m) in India. In Haiti it grows and fruits to perfection at 6,000 ft (1,830 m). In cooler climates, it succeeds at lower elevations. It does best where the temperature remains above 50º F (10º C). Frost at 28º F (-2.2º C) kills the small branches and foliage of mature trees but not the largest branches and main stem. The tree will recover if such frosts are not prolonged or frequent. However, seedlings and cuttings are readily killed by frost during their first year"

https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tree_tomato.html

My guess it would not be that happy in Florida.


I was thinking that the climates were very different, but then I remember OScar saying he harvested them, and IIRC, his climate is quite wet.  Oscar, how do tamarillos do on your property?

Yeah i grow them and they do fine here. So humidity is not a problem. i think we have higher humidity then you do. But the person who said they are originally sub tropical is correct. They can adapt fine to tropical areas as long as they don't get too much direct intense sunlight. Due to very large leaves the plants dehydrate really fast. So in the tropics they need dappled sunlight. I get good harvests here at 650 ft. elevation. I think i could even grow them at sea level if they got more shade. Our constant rains helps to keep the leaves from drying out. But it's true that the plants are healthier and more productive at above 1000 ft. elevation. They like that constant cloud cover, fog, and cooler temperatures. I think similar is true of the related plants: naranjilla and cocona, both of which i've also grown and fruited fine here.



fruitlovers, I agree with you!....My Tamarillo tree is 1 1/2 years old....She is about 5 feet tall right now!...It was planted from seeds that my mother-in-law brought them from Ecuador......So far is doing fine, ok, right here in South Florida (Miami)!....Has been planted strategic in one side of my house, so it gets direct sunlight only in the morning..... You can see in the pictures is flowering right now for the first time!....
















« Last Edit: May 11, 2016, 07:39:34 AM by HMelendez »

gunnar429

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2016, 10:08:14 AM »
Julia Morton says it is grown occasionally in Florida. 

She also states:
"The tree tomato is not tropical but subtropical. It flourishes between 5,000 and 10,000 ft (1,525-3,050 m) in Ecuador; between 1,000 and 3,000 ft (305-915 m) in Puerto Rico; 1,000 to 7,500 ft (305-2,288 m) in India. In Haiti it grows and fruits to perfection at 6,000 ft (1,830 m). In cooler climates, it succeeds at lower elevations. It does best where the temperature remains above 50º F (10º C). Frost at 28º F (-2.2º C) kills the small branches and foliage of mature trees but not the largest branches and main stem. The tree will recover if such frosts are not prolonged or frequent. However, seedlings and cuttings are readily killed by frost during their first year"

https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tree_tomato.html

My guess it would not be that happy in Florida.

I was thinking that the climates were very different, but then I remember OScar saying he harvested them, and IIRC, his climate is quite wet.  Oscar, how do tamarillos do on your property?
Yeah i grow them and they do fine here. So humidity is not a problem. i think we have higher humidity then you do. But the person who said they are originally sub tropical is correct. They can adapt fine to tropical areas as long as they don't get too much direct intense sunlight. Due to very large leaves the plants dehydrate really fast. So in the tropics they need dappled sunlight. I get good harvests here at 650 ft. elevation. I think i could even grow them at sea level if they got more shade. Our constant rains helps to keep the leaves from drying out. But it's true that the plants are healthier and more productive at above 1000 ft. elevation. They like that constant cloud cover, fog, and cooler temperatures. I think similar is true of the related plants: naranjilla and cocona, both of which i've also grown and fruited fine here.

What were your thoughts/opinions of these 2 fruits?  Thanks.
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

geosulcata

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2016, 12:27:56 PM »
Ours flowered last year in Sarasota but didn't set fruit. So far I have 2 fruit set this year with many more flowers. The fruits seem to be developing nicely. I have mine growing in a pot.

fruitlovers

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2016, 04:42:44 PM »
Julia Morton says it is grown occasionally in Florida. 

She also states:
"The tree tomato is not tropical but subtropical. It flourishes between 5,000 and 10,000 ft (1,525-3,050 m) in Ecuador; between 1,000 and 3,000 ft (305-915 m) in Puerto Rico; 1,000 to 7,500 ft (305-2,288 m) in India. In Haiti it grows and fruits to perfection at 6,000 ft (1,830 m). In cooler climates, it succeeds at lower elevations. It does best where the temperature remains above 50º F (10º C). Frost at 28º F (-2.2º C) kills the small branches and foliage of mature trees but not the largest branches and main stem. The tree will recover if such frosts are not prolonged or frequent. However, seedlings and cuttings are readily killed by frost during their first year"

https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/tree_tomato.html

My guess it would not be that happy in Florida.

I was thinking that the climates were very different, but then I remember OScar saying he harvested them, and IIRC, his climate is quite wet.  Oscar, how do tamarillos do on your property?
Yeah i grow them and they do fine here. So humidity is not a problem. i think we have higher humidity then you do. But the person who said they are originally sub tropical is correct. They can adapt fine to tropical areas as long as they don't get too much direct intense sunlight. Due to very large leaves the plants dehydrate really fast. So in the tropics they need dappled sunlight. I get good harvests here at 650 ft. elevation. I think i could even grow them at sea level if they got more shade. Our constant rains helps to keep the leaves from drying out. But it's true that the plants are healthier and more productive at above 1000 ft. elevation. They like that constant cloud cover, fog, and cooler temperatures. I think similar is true of the related plants: naranjilla and cocona, both of which i've also grown and fruited fine here.

What were your thoughts/opinions of these 2 fruits?  Thanks.
I like the naranjilla. It has a taste similar to kiwi. It is very seedy, but if you make drinks can filter all the seeds out. The cocona is not very good out of hand. It is mostly used cooked. I never really got around to doing that. Tree tomato (tamarillo) is by far my favorite of the 3.
Oscar

geosulcata

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Re: Tamarillo care
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2016, 05:20:53 PM »
I think similar is true of the related plants: naranjilla and cocona, both of which i've also grown and fruited fine here.

What were your thoughts/opinions of these 2 fruits?  Thanks.
[/quote]
 Naranjilla grows well and fruits readily in Sarasota.

 

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