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Author Topic: Scion wood storage  (Read 2308 times)

Tim

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Scion wood storage
« on: July 06, 2012, 02:34:07 PM »
Has anyone experimented with post harvest scion storage & viability at grafting?  Mangoes, Annonas, etc....

Steven's noted his avocado scions remain 100% viable for nearly half a year stored in the fridge.  Epicotyl Grafting thread.

I've read Cherimoya scions can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.  Does anyone know if Atemoya scions can survive just as long refrigerated?  What about in transit wrapped in damp paper towels & sealed in zip lock bag?
Tim

Jsvand5

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2012, 02:40:41 PM »
Has anyone experimented with post harvest scion storage & viability at grafting?  Mangoes, Annonas, etc....

Steven's noted his avocado scions remain 100% viable for nearly half a year stored in the fridge.  Epicotyl Grafting thread.

I've read Cherimoya scions can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.  Does anyone know if Atemoya scions can survive just as long refrigerated?  What about in transit wrapped in damp paper towels & sealed in zip lock bag?


Cherimoya can last way longer than 2 weeks in the fridge. I have done a couple that were 2 months old that worked fine.

Tim

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2012, 04:18:09 PM »
This is directly from Fairchild website regarding mango scions...

Quote
The scions can be placed in a plastic bag and stored at a temperature of 10C (50F) for up to 10 to 14 days.
Tim

Jsvand5

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2012, 05:03:30 PM »
Maybe I was just lucky but 2 month old wood worked for me. Got two out of three to take.

Tim

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2012, 05:10:39 PM »
Maybe I was just lucky but 2 month old wood worked for me. Got two out of three to take.
I think you misunderstood my previous post, which was specifically related to mango.  My original question, however, you partially answered.  I don't doubt your findings at all, I think either Har or Jeff mentioned discarded scions or pruned branches push new growth many weeks after they're cut but don't know how rare a feat that is.  I'm curious as to how long it can survive without refrigeration.
Tim

fyliu

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2012, 10:14:47 PM »
I've had a lyndstrom atemoya scion in a plastic zipper bag with peat and perlite in the shade for 4 months now. It was in a glass of water in my room for the first month as a leftover from grafting. It's trying to grow but has no roots and stopped. Still green and just sitting in the bag. I let weeds grow in the bag and toss in seeds of other stuff. It's moist in there but no rot. I think the weeds are helping maintain a healthy environment.

Anyway, just put annona scions in clean water and they'll last at least a month in room temperature.

BMc

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2012, 11:18:38 PM »
A commercial nursery here says they can store their budwood for around 9 months without problem if they have to wait for the right time to graft. This is mostly just for cvs that are not locally grown and wood needs to come from NQ to be grafted. They graft thousands of trees a day when the time is right.

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2012, 06:55:56 PM »
How I stored the Avocado scions!

1. Select mature scions.
2. Wrap the scions with a paper towel and moisten with water(Not dripping).
3. Put the bundle in a clear plastic bag
4. Store the bundle in the fridge in the vegetable compartment.
5. leave them until it's time to graft.
6. When it's time to graft, discard all sprouting scions.

Thats it...nothing special  ;)

This was not successful with Annona material!
 
Good Luck!
Steven

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2012, 09:30:46 PM »
Steven, do you wrap the ends of the scions with paper or no? Some people take care to not let paper touch any open wounds on the scions.

Yes, annonas scions seem to work differently than deciduous plants. They don't require cold storage.

Tim

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2012, 10:43:58 PM »
That doesn't sound too promising for my original intent for this thread  :(
...This was not successful with Annona material!
 
Good Luck!
Tim

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2012, 12:15:19 AM »
How I stored the Avocado scions!

1. Select mature scions.
2. Wrap the scions with a paper towel and moisten with water(Not dripping).
3. Put the bundle in a clear plastic bag
4. Store the bundle in the fridge in the vegetable compartment.
5. leave them until it's time to graft.
6. When it's time to graft, discard all sprouting scions.

Thats it...nothing special  ;)

This was not successful with Annona material!
 
Good Luck!

Sounds good Steven. Except that i would replace the paper towel for another material. Paper seems to attract mold. Better would be to use just about anything else. The best is sphagnum moss, second best is peat moss, third best is vermiculite. Moisten them and then squeeze all the water out. Place in zip lock bag, wrap tightly, and use rubber bands to maintain pressure. The other way is to wrap each scion in parafilm or buddy tape. But i find that way too laborious when doing lots of them!
Oscar

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2012, 06:11:14 AM »
Steven, do you wrap the ends of the scions with paper or no? Some people take care to not let paper touch any open wounds on the scions.

Yes, annonas scions seem to work differently than deciduous plants. They don't require cold storage.
Hi Fang,
Yes, I was not concern about the humid paper towel coming in contact with the open wounds. I forgot to metion that i remove the petioles with a razor blades, so that the petioles don't become a source of infection for mold. None of the scions were contaminated and i just discarded the sprouting scions, which happened around the 5th and 6th month of storage.
That doesn't sound too promising for my original intent for this thread  :(
...This was not successful with Annona material!
 Good Luck!
Hi Tim,
The Annona material was not Cherimoya ;) So, i cannot comment on storing cherimoya. What I would do, I would seal the scions with melted candle wax to ''lock'' the moisture in(you must make an even coating of wax and do it fast. then you immediately cool the scions in water) put the material in a zip lock bag with peat or perlite like Fang did and store in a cool place or pop them in the fridge.(Do both ;) )
Experiment Experiment Experiment...I luv to Experiment ;D  See what works for you.


Sounds good Steven. Except that i would replace the paper towel for another material. Paper seems to attract mold. Better would be to use just about anything else. The best is sphagnum moss, second best is peat moss, third best is vermiculite. Moisten them and then squeeze all the water out. Place in zip lock bag, wrap tightly, and use rubber bands to maintain pressure. The other way is to wrap each scion in parafilm or buddy tape. But i find that way too laborious when doing lots of them!

Hi Oscar,
Your suggestions are also top notch. If you are worried that the mold will settle in, you can dust the scions with cinnamon(Cheap one for the job) to inhibit the formation of mold since cinnamon has anti-fungal properties. I use it all the time on orchids that have an open wound after repotting or harvesting Dendrobium cuttings for planting. Sphagnum moss has also anti-fungal properties and is an excellent material for storing scions like avocado. 8)     
 
Steven

fyliu

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #12 on: July 13, 2012, 10:23:09 AM »
I don't even refridgerate my atemoya scion. It just sits in outdoor shade in its plastic ziplock bag and moist environment created by overgrown weeds in the bag. I consider it a discard but I'm interested in seeing whether it will root. It's true when people tell me cherimoyas don't root easily, not after 4 months anyway. It still looked plump and healthy.

amitzauber

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scion for grafting
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2012, 08:58:36 AM »
hi all

do you send scion to other forum members?

if yes how do you do that ?

how can you save the scion good quality for long distance shipping?

thanks

amit zauber

nullzero

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Re: scion for grafting
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2012, 11:25:36 AM »
hi all

do you send scion to other forum members?

if yes how do you do that ?

how can you save the scion good quality for long distance shipping?

thanks

amit zauber

Plastic bag with slightly damp peat moss or coco coir. Wrap the scion in parafilm/buddy tape/ or something like it.
Grow mainly edible and herbal plants. Favorites are the fruits, vegetables, and tea plants.

Felipe

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Re: scion for grafting
« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2012, 12:05:03 PM »
I think the best option is wrapping them in parafilm. Treating them with fungizides before, can help keeping them viable a little longer..

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: scion for grafting
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2012, 03:37:40 PM »
Depends on the sp. ;) Just keep them humid...not soaked, they will surely remain alive for grafting.

Nullzero and Felipe...I agree with both of y'all suggestions 8)
Steven

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Re: scion for grafting
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2012, 07:30:04 PM »
ive taken scions before, and forgot to graft them...I left them in a plastic bag, in my greenhouse.

the scions Eugenia pyriformis,  leafed out, and stayed alive for months, before finally dying.

Scions can remain viable for a long time if properly cared for.

I've grafted some other scions that I wrapped in buddy tape, and let sit around the house for a week, on the table, before finally grafting them...they did fine.

just felt like adding some notes about my experiences.


edzone9

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How long does Bud Wood Last In The Fridge ?
« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2014, 10:57:35 PM »
Hello Gang ;

Was wondering how long does BW last in the fridge ?

Thanks Ed..

ASaffron

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Re: How long does Bud Wood Last In The Fridge ?
« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2014, 11:33:12 PM »
depends on the budwood, temp of fridge, and how it's stored...

But generally speaking most stuff we grow can be stored for over a month....I've used scions after more than 2 months of being in the fridge...but anything longer than 3 months seems to be the threshold.

edzone9

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Re: How long does Bud Wood Last In The Fridge ?
« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2014, 08:06:33 AM »
Awesome Adam ! Thanks...

Ed...

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2014, 10:35:32 AM »
hello there,
im still new here
im about to store my mango scions using different media : s.moss, perlite and sawdust
the medias are moist with water
some of you recommend wrapping the scions with parafilm, while some recommend sealing the cut-end
the question are :
1. do i have to seal the whole scion (together with the buds at the top) or just the cut end at the bottom?
2. what do you mean by wrapping the scions? just wrap them to keep them together or wrapping them all over the scions?

looking forward to hear suggestions from all of u :)

fyliu

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Re: Scion wood storage
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2014, 03:30:51 PM »
Wrap the entire scion so it doesn't lose moisture. The idea is to keep it cool and moist and clean until you can graft it.

If you can graft it right away it's better to do so.

 

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