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Author Topic: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada  (Read 8348 times)

fruitlovers

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #25 on: July 11, 2012, 04:04:24 AM »
Nevev thought it was cold like that in Iceland...I could never survive put there. I already think my country is cold.

Balmy Toronto: 43 degrees North of equator
Pleasant Montreal: 45 degrees N.
Reykjavic, Iceland: 64 degrees N.
That's a 20 degree difference in latitude.
For comparison Miami at 25 degrees N. is a 20 degree difference in latitude with Montreal.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #26 on: July 11, 2012, 04:13:27 AM »
Continentality has a big influence on temps and seasonality when the moderating influence of the ocean is less.Siberian winters are colder than at the north pole in spite of the latitudinal difference.500km due inland from me winter mins are often 10c colder than here on the coast and summer maximums are usually 10c warmer.

fruitlovers

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #27 on: July 11, 2012, 04:27:22 AM »
Continentality has a big influence on temps and seasonality when the moderating influence of the ocean is less.Siberian winters are colder than at the north pole in spite of the latitudinal difference.500km due inland from me winter mins are often 10c colder than here on the coast and summer maximums are usually 10c warmer.

Depends on what part of Siberia you are talking about? Siberia is a vast area, bigger than Australia, almost twice the size of Australia. Southern Siberia has agriculture. That is where most of Siberians live. Don't think you will find any crops growing in the north pole!
Oscar

KarenRei

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #28 on: July 11, 2012, 05:58:41 AM »
Nevev thought it was cold like that in Iceland...I could never survive put there. I already think my country is cold.

We basically have no summer.  Our winters are actually milder than New York City's.  Windier and wetter and more unpredictable, though, but our average January temperature is barely below freezing.  It's not too cold for agriculture, but it limits what kind of crops you can grow outside - carrot, potato, radish, onion, rhubarb, certain varieties of barley and winter wheat, most berries, etc grow just fine here, but things like tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, etc don't stand a chance unless grown in a greenhouse.  Lots of greenhouses, though.

Given that I hate heat, I love this climate.  I'm wearing a cute sweater and a pair of winter boots as I write this, on a sunny july day.  :)  What I don't get is how people in other parts of the world go dancing!  Sometimes it's so "warm" in the evenings** in the summer that I can't seem to cool down fast enough just by stepping outside.

** - Evenings is a loose term here.  You can't judge it from darkness because it varies so much, and the nightlife scene generally runs from 12 to 6 AM, which technically is "morning"...

« Last Edit: July 11, 2012, 06:06:44 AM by KarenRei »
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fruitlovers

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #29 on: July 11, 2012, 06:06:25 AM »
Nevev thought it was cold like that in Iceland...I could never survive put there. I already think my country is cold.

We basically have no summer.  Our winters are actually milder than New York City's.  Windier and wetter and more unpredictable, though, but our average January temperature is barely below freezing.

Given that I hate heat, I love this climate.  I'm wearing a cute sweater and a pair of winter boots as I write this, on a sunny july day.  :)  What I don't get is how people in other parts of the world go dancing!  Sometimes it's so "warm" in the evenings** in the summer that I can't seem to cool down fast enough just by stepping outside.

** - Evenings is a loose term here.  You can't judge it from darkness because it varies so much, and the nightlife scene generally runs from 12 to 6 AM, which technically is "morning"...

Funny you hate heat, but like tropical plants, which requires heat?
Oscar

KarenRei

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #30 on: July 11, 2012, 06:08:25 AM »
Funny you hate heat, but like tropical plants, which requires heat?

Hehe, yeah, it's a bit ironic, but they stay indoors and so never experience the weather outside  :)  I'd be utterly miserable trying to grow them outdoors in an outdoor climate they'd tolerate; the fruit would rot on the trees if it even got that far because I'd be so miserable having to go outside to harvest in the summer!  They wouldn't get properly watered, pruned, sprayed, etc.  I remember how miserable it was just tending my garden in Iowa in the summer.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2012, 06:10:23 AM by KarenRei »
Jß, Úg er a­ rŠkta su­rŠnar pl÷ntur ß ═slandi. Nei, Úg er ekki klikku­. JŠja, kannski...

Mike T

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #31 on: July 11, 2012, 06:46:07 AM »
Oscar what I was getting at is there a large area of Siberia considerably bigger than the US that can experience temps colder than the north pole in winter.The north pole gets about -43c min winter temps but in the balmy major siberian city of Yakutz (pop 200 000) at 62 latitude temps can fall to  -64c.In summer with 30c max temps possible agriculture can take place.

This continental effect is often overlooked.The opposite is the maritime oceanic effect causes temp. moderation seasonally and for day time ranges.Many coastal areas feel the effects of moderation compared to inland areas.Of course there are ocean currents and prevailing winds to complicate things. Nonetheless when we are comparing climates these are things to consider.


samuelforest

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2012, 10:09:22 AM »
Montreal get huge changes in winter. Right now the temperature today will hit 30 degrees celsius, but in winter we can get easily to -20 degrees celsius and below. What makes me mad is that New York is not that far away and they get temperature relatively high in winter comparing of us. They benefit of the gulf stream, but us benefit of the labrador stream which is cold. Spring kick a lot faster than us. Iceland benefits too of the gulf stream that's why the temperature doesn't drop so much in winter.

bobbyjo

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #33 on: July 11, 2012, 10:35:28 AM »
Toronto's weather is similar to Montreal but TO gets less snow.
Samuel, just caught your post about the pots - yes it might be too big for the plant but I don't like transplanting them once they've been established.  Just worried it might stress them out & I have lost some in the past after a transplant.  Not sure it's the ideal way but I am more comfortable leaving them alone.

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #34 on: July 11, 2012, 10:47:21 AM »
I never lost a plant for this in the past. It's your choice, but sometimes it can occur in root rot. They seem to thrive, so should not worry..

I've been in Toronto and spring kicks faster. Toronto get barely snow, I think. It's not rare to have temperature above zero in January which the coldest month for us. I think Florida is December correct me if I'm wrong.

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #35 on: July 12, 2012, 02:21:32 AM »
Funny you hate heat, but like tropical plants, which requires heat?

Hehe, yeah, it's a bit ironic, but they stay indoors and so never experience the weather outside  :)  I'd be utterly miserable trying to grow them outdoors in an outdoor climate they'd tolerate; the fruit would rot on the trees if it even got that far because I'd be so miserable having to go outside to harvest in the summer!  They wouldn't get properly watered, pruned, sprayed, etc.  I remember how miserable it was just tending my garden in Iowa in the summer.

I spent a summer working at Seed Savers in Decorah, Iowa. Also didn't like all the days over 100F. Mamy tropical places, such as here, rarely get over 85F. So tropical doesn't mean 100F. In fact most tropicals don't much like temperatures over 100F either.
Oscar

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #36 on: July 12, 2012, 02:27:38 AM »
Oscar what I was getting at is there a large area of Siberia considerably bigger than the US that can experience temps colder than the north pole in winter.The north pole gets about -43c min winter temps but in the balmy major siberian city of Yakutz (pop 200 000) at 62 latitude temps can fall to  -64c.In summer with 30c max temps possible agriculture can take place.

This continental effect is often overlooked.The opposite is the maritime oceanic effect causes temp. moderation seasonally and for day time ranges.Many coastal areas feel the effects of moderation compared to inland areas.Of course there are ocean currents and prevailing winds to complicate things. Nonetheless when we are comparing climates these are things to consider.

There are 2 ways to define coldest place. One is by the place that reaches coldest recorded temperature in the whole year. The other is by average temperature over the whole year. If you do an average temperature over whole year you will indeed see that North Pole is quite a lot colder than any part of Siberia. The North Pole doesn't experience any warm weather during the summer. You will never be able to grow any crops there like in Siberia. Highest recorded temperature ever in summer at North Pole is 40F. If you use this average temperature method you find out coldest country is Greenland, not Russia or Canada. Coldest place on earth is Antarctica, but that's not a country. Using this method i think you also find out that Iceland is colder than Montreal because Iceland, like Karen pointed out, never has a summer.
Oscar

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #37 on: July 12, 2012, 02:56:07 AM »
Oscar what I was getting at is there a large area of Siberia considerably bigger than the US that can experience temps colder than the north pole in winter.The north pole gets about -43c min winter temps but in the balmy major siberian city of Yakutz (pop 200 000) at 62 latitude temps can fall to  -64c.In summer with 30c max temps possible agriculture can take place.

This continental effect is often overlooked.The opposite is the maritime oceanic effect causes temp. moderation seasonally and for day time ranges.Many coastal areas feel the effects of moderation compared to inland areas.Of course there are ocean currents and prevailing winds to complicate things. Nonetheless when we are comparing climates these are things to consider.

Mike, i'm aware that there are other factors involved in climate besides latitude. This island i believe has more climates than any other place of similar small size. Only climate we're missing is permanent tundra. Coastal beaches here have very different climate than summit of our volcanos, which are almost 14,000 feet. Then there is everything in between.
Oscar

samuelforest

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #38 on: August 12, 2012, 06:25:03 PM »
I forgot to ask you something Bobby. Where do you get your foliage pro? I'm looking for that fertilizer and I guess you know a great source out there in Canada? I've looked on ebay and Amazon, but I just wanted to know where do you get it?

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #39 on: August 12, 2012, 07:52:40 PM »
I forgot to ask you something Bobby. Where do you get your foliage pro? I'm looking for that fertilizer and I guess you know a great source out there in Canada? I've looked on ebay and Amazon, but I just wanted to know where do you get it?


Samuel:
I just purchased another gallon of it from:
http://www.southwestplantscape.com/swpp/catalog/fp-1g_739.htm
This is the reply I got back:
"The price for a one gallon container of Foliage pro is now $33.12.  UPS shipping is now $ 17.78"
That is shipping to New Jersey where someone will pick up for me and bring back over.  Southwest is the cheapest I found when considering the total cost of item and shipping to a US address.  I am not sure of shipping to Canada but it was alot - can't remember exactly how much as it was about two years ago that I bought my first container.
I did check for a store in Canada and I think there was only one in BC that carried it but it was just too much so I went this route.
Hope that helps.

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Re: Latest Additions of Mango Plants in Toronto, Canada
« Reply #40 on: August 12, 2012, 08:02:12 PM »
Thanks Bobby and yes it does help :) I might try to find some in Vermont, I'm suppose to go this week.

 

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