Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?  (Read 7383 times)

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3876
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #25 on: June 04, 2016, 10:51:17 AM »
Lemon zest fits the bill. It does take 4 or so years to come into production though (here in FL).

Don't say that, just put one in. Probably means 6 years for us, although I do have a few rocket fuels in my tool box to help speed things up. ;)

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4669
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2016, 11:56:05 AM »
Nah, it might actually be fewer than 4 years for you, since you have more cold which tends to be a precocity inducer. The guys in california get fruit within a year or two. The tree is a vigorous grower, but it won't flower until it's either mature enough or stressed.

Lemon zest fits the bill. It does take 4 or so years to come into production though (here in FL).

Don't say that, just put one in. Probably means 6 years for us, although I do have a few rocket fuels in my tool box to help speed things up. ;)
Jeff  :-)

zands

  • wango_tango_mango_zango
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4089
    • Zone 10b, Florida, USA, 33321
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2016, 02:09:20 PM »
xsm
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 11:29:58 PM by zands »

cbss_daviefl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 968
    • USA, Southwest Ranches,FL 33331, 10B
    • View Profile
    • bfgtropicals.com
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2016, 02:20:53 PM »
I have two lemon zest trees and both produced fruit in two years in the ground, 6 on one and 15 - 20 on the other, during 2015.  This year the counts are higher but a late bloom and rainy weather took a toll. 

Lemon zest fits the bill. It does take 4 or so years to come into production though (here in FL).

Don't say that, just put one in. Probably means 6 years for us, although I do have a few rocket fuels in my tool box to help speed things up. ;)
Brandon

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4669
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2016, 03:04:00 PM »
Lucky. Two of mine (on the mulched lot) started bearing at exactly 4 years in ground from 3 gal. My third, on the sandy lot and in ground for almost 2 years, still hasn't borne a fruit. I know sheehan's tree was also an early bearer; zands also had an early bearer. But many will camp out for a few years before producing.

The nice thing is that first crop is between 40 and 80 mangoes. The one LZ planted in 2012 and in its first year of production has 40 mangoes and the other one that was planted in 2011 and which began to bear last year has somewhere around 90 -- which is good considering that each mango generally weighs over a pound.

The most annoying tree for me was the Okrung, which took 5 years in ground to bear from a large 7 gallon tree. TnRobbie reported similar reports.

I have two lemon zest trees and both produced fruit in two years in the ground, 6 on one and 15 - 20 on the other, during 2015.  This year the counts are higher but a late bloom and rainy weather took a toll. 

Lemon zest fits the bill. It does take 4 or so years to come into production though (here in FL).

Don't say that, just put one in. Probably means 6 years for us, although I do have a few rocket fuels in my tool box to help speed things up. ;)
Jeff  :-)

savemejebus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 599
    • Coral Springs, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #30 on: June 04, 2016, 03:59:44 PM »
My lemon zest has fruit for the first time. 2 years in ground from 3 gallon. About 10 fruit hanging on.

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3876
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #31 on: June 05, 2016, 09:16:14 AM »
My experience has been that trunk girth, vigor, drives production.  My avocado grafts have to have trunks of about 2" or more before they fruit.  Speaking of which I was pruning my Reed, got goofy and snipped off this branch with 2 little babes from this year's fruit.


The nice thing is that first crop is between 40 and 80 mangoes.


Curious, what do you home gardeners do with so much fruit?  80 lbs. off ONE tree?  :o  You sell, correct?  Also, how much property are you growing on?

mangomandan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1106
  • When a man is tired of mangos, he is tired of life
    • USA, Lake Worth, Florida, 33461, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #32 on: June 05, 2016, 09:25:02 AM »
Despite having several mature trees, I've never really had enough fruit at one time to think about selling it.

I share with friends, former coworkers, and also ship mangos to relatives and old neighbors in the north country.

Also sometimes trade for varieties I don't have.

Sleepdoc

  • Davie, Florida Zone 10b
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 782
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #33 on: June 05, 2016, 09:28:18 AM »
J12 this morning




gnappi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1736
    • South East Florida (U.S.A) Zone 10A
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #34 on: June 05, 2016, 09:38:18 AM »
I would remove Julie and Cogshall from your list. Productivity of cogshall is medium. Julie can be extremely unproductive if not given adequate nutrition and not consistently sprayed for fungus.



This is why I have been grafing my Julie seedling. It has never been sprayed, and produces so much fruit (to the point I worry the tree will break)  without any extraordinary care.

Jeff, you need to swing by and get a look at my "Juicy Lucy"
Regards,

   Gary

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4669
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #35 on: June 05, 2016, 10:53:12 AM »
If we're talking lemon zest, they will all be devoured by mr and mrs cookie monster :-). I can generally plow through 5 to 7 mangoes in a day. Whatever is left over, my wife sells. We're on just over 1/2 acre with a smallish house, a tiny front yard, and no swimming pool, so the bulk of the land is growable :-).

The nice thing is that first crop is between 40 and 80 mangoes.

Curious, what do you home gardeners do with so much fruit?  80 lbs. off ONE tree?  :o  You sell, correct?  Also, how much property are you growing on?
Jeff  :-)

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4669
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #36 on: June 05, 2016, 10:56:18 AM »
I've seen a number of julie seedlings that are very productive. The j-12 is one example. But, a julie clone (one that tastes identical to the parent) and which is productive and disease free would be extremely popular.

I would remove Julie and Cogshall from your list. Productivity of cogshall is medium. Julie can be extremely unproductive if not given adequate nutrition and not consistently sprayed for fungus.



This is why I have been grafing my Julie seedling. It has never been sprayed, and produces so much fruit (to the point I worry the tree will break)  without any extraordinary care.

Jeff, you need to swing by and get a look at my "Juicy Lucy"
Jeff  :-)

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5623
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #37 on: June 05, 2016, 11:44:53 AM »
Nah, it might actually be fewer than 4 years for you, since you have more cold which tends to be a precocity inducer. The guys in california get fruit within a year or two. The tree is a vigorous grower, but it won't flower until it's either mature enough or stressed.

Lemon zest fits the bill. It does take 4 or so years to come into production though (here in FL).


Don't say that, just put one in. Probably means 6 years for us, although I do have a few rocket fuels in my tool box to help speed things up. ;)



I agree with Cookiemonster, I have two Lemon Zest trees on florida Turpentine rootstock that are starting their second year in the ground and one tree held several nubbin fruit the first year and the second tree is holding lots of thumb sized fruit this year. The canopy is only about three feet wide and I go by the Japanese method of allowing approx 60-80 leaves for each fruit to reach optimal flavor and sweetness so I'm only going to allow my tree to hold 2 fruit. This tree is planted very close to my house so I purposefully want to stunt its growth by allowing it to hold fruit.

But anyways, Mark, I think with your knowledge of plant growing and your relatively cool winters, you may get fruit within two year if you allow it. I hope you will be pleasantly surprised with the super awesome flavor of the Lemon Zest, it's absolutely incredible, one of my all time favorite mango varieties.

Here's a few shots of my young Lemon Zest, I'm sure more of the fruit will drop but if it doesn't soon, I will thin it down to a couple fruit. Here's in California and I assume other areas that are cooler, even some of the low producing mangos can be very highly productive like Eunices Edward tree that produces hundred of fruit.

Simon






edzone9

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2542
    • Zone 10 SW Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #38 on: June 05, 2016, 12:21:11 PM »
How do you guys rate Sunrise mango still have a chance to dig it up!

Ed
Zone 10

Squam256

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2103
  • Mangos and budwood for sale
    • USA, West Palm Beach, FL, 33405, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • https://www.facebook.com/TropicalAcresFarms
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #39 on: June 05, 2016, 01:42:39 PM »
How do you guys rate Sunrise mango still have a chance to dig it up!

Ed

Its very good, was productive in 2015. They seem to be down this year.

phantomcrab

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 550
    • USA, St. Petersburg, FL Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #40 on: June 05, 2016, 01:54:26 PM »
How do you guys rate Sunrise mango still have a chance to dig it up!

Ed
On both occasions when I tasted Sunrise at the F&S park it was very good but not as good as Edward or Mallika. I am not sure about its productivity.
Richard

Squam256

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2103
  • Mangos and budwood for sale
    • USA, West Palm Beach, FL, 33405, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • https://www.facebook.com/TropicalAcresFarms
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #41 on: June 05, 2016, 02:10:59 PM »
How do you guys rate Sunrise mango still have a chance to dig it up!

Ed
On both occasions when I tasted Sunrise at the F&S park it was very good but not as good as Edward or Mallika. I am not sure about its productivity.

You're likely thinking of the Merrit Island Sunset, which the Fruit & Spice Park has a tree of, rather than Sunrise which is a new Zill-mango.

Cookie Monster

  • Broward, FL Zone 10b
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4669
  • Eye like mangoes
    • Tamarac, FL, 33321, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #42 on: June 05, 2016, 02:55:22 PM »
I really liked the sunrise. It has a bit of a carrie flavor, which I really like. Mine was productive back in 2014, but both of my trees have been taking a break to get established.

Given that you only have 4 spots, I don't know if sunrise would make the cut.

Hopefully you have spots for more species other than just mango. Mangoes are great, but the season is short.

How do you guys rate Sunrise mango still have a chance to dig it up!

Ed
Jeff  :-)

edzone9

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2542
    • Zone 10 SW Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #43 on: June 05, 2016, 03:04:51 PM »
Jeff i will be taking my puertorican Avila avocado tree and my Poncho Avocado as well.

Thanks for your help !
Ed
Zone 10

phantomcrab

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 550
    • USA, St. Petersburg, FL Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #44 on: June 05, 2016, 03:43:10 PM »
Quote
How do you guys rate Sunrise mango still have a chance to dig it up!

Ed
On both occasions when I tasted Sunrise at the F&S park it was very good but not as good as Edward or Mallika. I am not sure about its productivity.

You're likely thinking of the Merritt Island Sunset, which the Fruit & Spice Park has a tree of, rather than Sunrise which is a new Zill-mango.
Correct. Thanks.
Richard

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3876
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #45 on: June 06, 2016, 07:47:30 AM »

I agree with Cookiemonster, I have two Lemon Zest trees on florida Turpentine rootstock that are starting their second year in the ground and one tree held several nubbin fruit the first year and the second tree is holding lots of thumb sized fruit this year. The canopy is only about three feet wide and I go by the Japanese method of allowing approx 60-80 leaves for each fruit to reach optimal flavor and sweetness so I'm only going to allow my tree to hold 2 fruit. This tree is planted very close to my house so I purposefully want to stunt its growth by allowing it to hold fruit.


Interesting, 80 leaves per fruit sounds like overkill but if that gets you the best fruit so be it.  It is all about canopy to fruit balance for example regarding vineyard management the rule of thumb is 15 leaves is required to mature one cluster of grapes.

Quote
But anyways, Mark, I think with your knowledge of plant growing and your relatively cool winters, you may get fruit within two year if you allow it. I hope you will be pleasantly surprised with the super awesome flavor of the Lemon Zest, it's absolutely incredible, one of my all time favorite mango varieties.


I let lows get to 34F.  Surprised cold weather plays a part!

Am excited. Recently chopped a new Plantagram LZ down to just above the first node and am establishing a 4 main scaffold branch profile like you would a peach or apple tree but more upright than vase like.  Was nothing but a bare stick 6 weeks ago, is now holding a fine little canopy.  What surprises me is the size of the leaves.   :o I have quite a few that are a foot or better in length and about 3" wide!  Have heard it is the best, am excited.  BTW, gave Ed Self about 15 sticks, he grafted some and shared the rest with Texas growers at one of the Austin scion exchange groups so it's getting a foot hold with Texas growers. 

Quote
Here's a few shots of my young Lemon Zest, I'm sure more of the fruit will drop but if it doesn't soon, I will thin it down to a couple fruit. Here's in California and I assume other areas that are cooler, even some of the low producing mangos can be very highly productive like Eunices Edward tree that produces hundred of fruit.








Incredible!

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5623
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #46 on: June 06, 2016, 08:19:24 AM »
I believe the Japanese use about 40-60 leaves but I'm accounting for the fact they grow theirs in a greenhouse. I also upped the number of leaves in the hopes my tree will get a vegetative flush as well. I'm glad Lemon Zest is spreading around, I hope Sweet Tart makes its way around as well.

Simon

shinzo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 337
  • High Density Urban Cultivator
    • Tunis (Tunisia) - 10 b
    • View Profile
Re: Top 5 heavy producing Mango Trees?
« Reply #47 on: June 06, 2016, 09:11:45 AM »

Am excited. Recently chopped a new Plantagram LZ down to just above the first node and am establishing a 4 main scaffold branch profile like you would a peach or apple tree but more upright than vase like.  Was nothing but a bare stick 6 weeks ago, is now holding a fine little canopy.  What surprises me is the size of the leaves.   :o I have quite a few that are a foot or better in length and about 3" wide!  Have heard it is the best, am excited.  BTW, gave Ed Self about 15 sticks, he grafted some and shared the rest with Texas growers at one of the Austin scion exchange groups so it's getting a foot hold with Texas growers. 


Can you post the pics of the pugged trunk andthe canopy now? thanks

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers