Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: My trip to Belize  (Read 4778 times)

Hollywood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 609
  • Zone 10B - Hollywood, FL
    • USA, Hollywood, FL 33020, zone 10b
    • View Profile
My trip to Belize
« on: July 09, 2012, 05:28:59 PM »
My trip to the market in San Ignacio yielded some finds that were new to me, but mostly mediocre. This is the first time I've uploaded images to a forum, so apologies beforehand if it doesn't work.

I have always heard of the ice cream bean but had never tried it. The guy in the market called it Inga paterna. It was sweet and I can see why it is eaten primarily by children: it is tedious and you don't get a lot of flesh for the effort. I think I had imagined that there would be more fluff inside.





Below is Supa (Creole), or Cocoyol (Spanish). It is a fruit that is marinated in brown sugar syrup. Unfortunately I lost the bag before I had a chance to try it. Actually, maybe it is the dish that is called Supa and not the fruit.



The berries below are called "Craboo." They are used for making a wine or liquor. The berries were not offensive, but kind of mealy, with a small hard seed in the center.



Here is "Waya," or "Kinep." I am not very picky when it comes to fruit, but Yuck. Sized like a lychee, peels like a lychee...NOT a lychee. It is slimy, sticky and very astringent. I had to get my toothbrush to rake the remaining slime off the back of my tongue, after my failed attempts to swallow. An internet search indicates that I may have eaten this unripe. It SEEMED ripe, so I think eating this fruit would take a certain amount of practice and/or luck.



Finally, "Dog Balls." Only children eat this fruit when they are running around through the bushes. I tried while horseback riding and it is tasteless. I am told that fruit from the coffee tree tastes similar.





« Last Edit: July 09, 2012, 05:46:01 PM by Hollywood »
Katie

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10998
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2012, 07:39:20 PM »
Katie, doesn't seem like you liked anything you tried? Too bad! The ice cream bean is Inga and there are a lots of different species, and some do have a lot of pulp inside and are easy to open. The yellow berries are not berries at all but a fruit tree called nance. It makes a great ice cream. The kinep is called Spanish Lime in english and can be quite good tasting, but pulp sticks like crazy to the seed, and there's not all that much to eat, just a lot of sucking on the seed.
Oscar

Hollywood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 609
  • Zone 10B - Hollywood, FL
    • USA, Hollywood, FL 33020, zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2012, 08:09:30 PM »
I liked the ice cream bean but I wish there had been more pulp! The other stuff I could live without, although I'm glad I got to try some new things. This was my second trip to Belize and I loved it. For anyone traveling to the rainforest in Belize, I highly recommend the Chaa Creek ecolodge, especially the "camp," where the home cooked meals are better than the restaurant's!
Katie

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3183
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2012, 11:54:31 PM »
Katie - you can find Kineps, commonly known as Spanish Limes/Genips/Mamoncillos in SFla, sold in bags on the streets of Ft. Lauderdale area (Sunrise Blvd/Powerline and surrounding areas) a little later in the summer.  They are eaten at various stages of ripeness and they can range from astringent and downright sour to semi sweet/sour.

Nance trees can be purchased in SFla and can be found growing in the PB/Broward/M-D County area.
- Rob

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10998
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2012, 01:12:01 AM »
Katie - you can find Kineps, commonly known as Spanish Limes/Genips/Mamoncillos in SFla, sold in bags on the streets of Ft. Lauderdale area (Sunrise Blvd/Powerline and surrounding areas) a little later in the summer.  They are eaten at various stages of ripeness and they can range from astringent and downright sour to semi sweet/sour.

Nance trees can be purchased in SFla and can be found growing in the PB/Broward/M-D County area.

There are some really good tasting selected cultivars tasting a bit like candy. It's a very popular fruit in Puerto Rico where they are called quenepa. It's just a bit tedious dealing with super clingstone pulp. This is one fruit that certainly could use improvement, namely seedless fruits! If seedless types could be developed it could be almost on par with good rambutan, longan, or even lychee.
Oscar

murahilin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2262
    • USA Greenacres, Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2012, 08:03:10 AM »
Katie, doesn't seem like you liked anything you tried? Too bad! The ice cream bean is Inga and there are a lots of different species, and some do have a lot of pulp inside and are easy to open. The yellow berries are not berries at all but a fruit tree called nance. It makes a great ice cream. The kinep is called Spanish Lime in english and can be quite good tasting, but pulp sticks like crazy to the seed, and there's not all that much to eat, just a lot of sucking on the seed.

I think it would be better to say its called Spanish Lime in the US and not just in English because many of the English speaking Caribbean calls it names such as Genip in Jamaica, or Chenette in Trinidad.

Puerto Rico has been selecting improved cultivars for a few years now and there are some cultivars such as Sasa and Jose Pabon which are a bit more freestone and higher brix. Those two cultivars are becoming more common in South Florida now because they were introduced to TREC by Bryan Brunner in 2004 and those including a few other cultivars from PR are also be grown at Fairchild Farm. Pine Island and Excalibur have begun propagating both cultivars. At the University of PR they have a selection program going on right now to find better cultivars of Spanish Lime that were being grown in the island. I will see if I can find the pdf that lists all of them.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2012, 12:05:00 PM by murahilin »

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2798
    • USA, Davie, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2012, 08:21:37 AM »
Hi Katie and thanks for posting pics of your fruit encounters.  It was nice to meet you at the BRFVC meeting on Saturday.  My expereinces with Inga and Spanish Lime (momoncillo, quenepa, chenette, etc) have also been underwhelming to say the least.  Ice Cream Bean, Inga species, that I have tried have had about as much resemblence to ice cream as I have to say Katy Perry (hint......that's no resemblence whatsoever for those that have not seen me).  There are supposedly some wortwhile Ingas in South America somewhere.  I have had this discussion with Felipe of our fourm back on Garden Web.  I am still waiting for that fateful day when I encounter an Inga worth fighting with and then eating.  I did plant one out from seed about 15 years ago.  It fruited in a few years and then I yanked.  It was an attractive tree....but a waste of fruiting space.

On the Spanish Lime front.......I would have to describe Oscar's hopes for developing a Spanish Lime that rivals lychees, longans  and rambutan as a major pipe dream and will not likely happen in our lifetime.  While apreciated by island people (read that as...... those that have never tasted lychees) they are best know for choking young children to death because of the seed size and need to suck on the seeds to have any hope to get the flesh off of it. 

Harry
Harry
Davie, FL 
USA

Tropicdude

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
    • Dominican Republic, Zone 13B.
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2012, 02:25:23 PM »
Quote
On the Spanish Lime front.......I would have to describe Oscar's hopes for developing a Spanish Lime that rivals lychees, longans  and rambutan as a major pipe dream and will not likely happen in our lifetime.  While apreciated by island people (read that as...... those that have never tasted lychees) they are best know for choking young children to death because of the seed size and need to suck on the seeds to have any hope to get the flesh off of it. 

They call them Limoncillo here in the DR, and I wouldn't let any of my kids eat them, I have known people that lost a child to these things.   There size and slipperiness make for the perfect choke hazard. they are no where as popular as in times past because of this reason.

To many other great fruit in the world.
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5237
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2012, 02:47:13 PM »
Haus Inga edulis is worthwhile and there is variation between trees in the flesh yield and sweetness of the flesh.I tried a very good bean a few weeks ago and wa surprized at how good it was.

Hollywood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 609
  • Zone 10B - Hollywood, FL
    • USA, Hollywood, FL 33020, zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2012, 05:06:59 PM »
Tropicdude (or anyone else)-

What do you think about the safety of hog plum/jacote? I was considering planting one on the swale outside my fence (so the kids would have to ask permission to go get some and be supervised while eating) but now I'm getting a little freaked out (kids do not always listen)...
Katie

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3183
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2012, 05:17:27 PM »
Tropicdude (or anyone else)-

What do you think about the safety of hog plum/jacote? I was considering planting one on the swale outside my fence (so the kids would have to ask permission to go get some and be supervised while eating) but now I'm getting a little freaked out (kids do not always listen)...
It may not be kids you have to worry about.  If you plant this on the swale of a public road you may find a lot of 2 legged thieves helping themselves to the fruit before the kids ever get a chance to eat it. 

I understand your concerns, after hearing about the mamoncillos, but I think you are worring a bit too much.  There are many food items kids can get a hold of that can harm them (i.e. - choking on a seed of a fruit) or make them sick that I don't think I would worry about a hog plum (I don't know your area kids but I would question if they would even like them).  There is also, and would be for most fruits that grow in atree, that they would eventually have to climb a ladder or the actual tree to pick the fruit.  If you are truly worried and want to plant something that will provide kids with fruit they can pick and eat, go with something that has no seeds.  Maybe a green/white mullberry ?
- Rob

Hollywood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 609
  • Zone 10B - Hollywood, FL
    • USA, Hollywood, FL 33020, zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2012, 05:32:17 PM »
Rob, thanks for the input. When I was referring to "the kids" I was speaking of my own progeny; the fence is to protect the public from them.  ;)
Katie

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3183
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2012, 05:41:20 PM »
Rob, thanks for the input. When I was referring to "the kids" I was speaking of my own progeny; the fence is to protect the public from them.  ;)
You had said, " I was considering planting one on the swale outside my fence "...I figured by that that it would be "open to the general public.
- Rob

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10998
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2012, 05:50:32 PM »
Hi Katie and thanks for posting pics of your fruit encounters.  It was nice to meet you at the BRFVC meeting on Saturday.  My expereinces with Inga and Spanish Lime (momoncillo, quenepa, chenette, etc) have also been underwhelming to say the least.  Ice Cream Bean, Inga species, that I have tried have had about as much resemblence to ice cream as I have to say Katy Perry (hint......that's no resemblence whatsoever for those that have not seen me).  There are supposedly some wortwhile Ingas in South America somewhere.  I have had this discussion with Felipe of our fourm back on Garden Web.  I am still waiting for that fateful day when I encounter an Inga worth fighting with and then eating.  I did plant one out from seed about 15 years ago.  It fruited in a few years and then I yanked.  It was an attractive tree....but a waste of fruiting space.

On the Spanish Lime front.......I would have to describe Oscar's hopes for developing a Spanish Lime that rivals lychees, longans  and rambutan as a major pipe dream and will not likely happen in our lifetime.  While apreciated by island people (read that as...... those that have never tasted lychees) they are best know for choking young children to death because of the seed size and need to suck on the seeds to have any hope to get the flesh off of it. 

Harry

There were other cynics like yourself that said the same thing to me about the possibility of a seedless lychee. In fact there was a geneticist that told me it was "impossible" to have a seedless lychee because an aril needs a seed around which to develop. So much for that theory!
As for ice cream bean, true it doesn't taste like ice cream, i would have named it cotton candy bean. Some people really adore this fruit. For example, look at Adam Gollner's book Fruit Hunters. He said it was the best fruit he ever tasted! The ingas are incredibly multi purpose trees: they fix nitrogen, can be used for alley cropping, grow in the worst of soils, make great shade trees, always with beautiful flowers, the lumber is useable, and on top of that they produce edible pods. Should be much more widely planted in my opinion. Some of the inga species from southern Brazil can also take some cold so would do well in Florida and parts of California.
Oscar

Hollywood

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 609
  • Zone 10B - Hollywood, FL
    • USA, Hollywood, FL 33020, zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2012, 05:57:13 PM »
It will be on the swale, open to the general public. Part of the reason for placing it outside the fence, versus inside, is the concern that the little kids of this household might eat it and choke when I've got my back turned. If it is outside the gate, the hope is that they'll obey the house rules and not go out without an escort. Of course, I don't want neighborhood kids choking on it either, but I figure if they're out roaming the streets unsupervised they are well beyond the primary choking risk cutoff, which is 5 years of age. There do not seem to be many Latinos in the neighborhood, so I'd be surprised if anyone even realized what it is (although a couple Indian families have been driving through the neighborhood and have knocked on my door several times this mango season, so fruit hunters are everywhere, I guess). I am not adverse to sharing, I just hope people leave us a few.
Katie

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2798
    • USA, Davie, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2012, 08:54:34 PM »
There were other cynics like yourself that said the same thing to me about the possibility of a seedless lychee. In fact there was a geneticist that told me it was "impossible" to have a seedless lychee because an aril needs a seed around which to develop. So much for that theory!
As for ice cream bean, true it doesn't taste like ice cream, i would have named it cotton candy bean. Some people really adore this fruit. For example, look at Adam Gollner's book Fruit Hunters. He said it was the best fruit he ever tasted! The ingas are incredibly multi purpose trees: they fix nitrogen, can be used for alley cropping, grow in the worst of soils, make great shade trees, always with beautiful flowers, the lumber is useable, and on top of that they produce edible pods. Should be much more widely planted in my opinion. Some of the inga species from southern Brazil can also take some cold so would do well in Florida and parts of California.

And where and by whom is all this improvement of this species (spanish lime) taking place?  I suppose if we can get life out of some mix of organic compounds over time as supposedly occurred millions of years ago, spanish limes could become as good as its old world family members.  Might take a long time and will only happen after an extensive program of breeding and selection.  So let the process begin.

Harry
Harry
Davie, FL 
USA

MarinFla

  • Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 453
    • USA, Deerfield Beach/FL, 33442. Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2012, 11:28:24 PM »
Hi Katie and thanks for posting pics of your fruit encounters.  It was nice to meet you at the BRFVC meeting on Saturday.  My expereinces with Inga and Spanish Lime (momoncillo, quenepa, chenette, etc) have also been underwhelming to say the least.  Ice Cream Bean, Inga species, that I have tried have had about as much resemblence to ice cream as I have to say Katy Perry (hint......that's no resemblance whatsoever for those that have not seen me).  There are supposedly some wortwhile Ingas in South America somewhere.  I have had this discussion with Felipe of our fourm back on Garden Web.  I am still waiting for that fateful day when I encounter an Inga worth fighting with and then eating.  I did plant one out from seed about 15 years ago.  It fruited in a few years and then I yanked.  It was an attractive tree....but a waste of fruiting space.

On the Spanish Lime front.......I would have to describe Oscar's hopes for developing a Spanish Lime that rivals lychees, longans  and rambutan as a major pipe dream and will not likely happen in our lifetime.  While apreciated by island people (read that as...... those that have never tasted lychees) they are best know for choking young children to death because of the seed size and need to suck on the seeds to have any hope to get the flesh off of it. 

Harry
I would say be that's a good thing and I wouldn't recommend you dyeing your hair pink or blue to up that resemblance factor!

Tropicdude

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
    • Dominican Republic, Zone 13B.
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2012, 11:40:22 PM »
Tropicdude (or anyone else)-

What do you think about the safety of hog plum/jacote? I was considering planting one on the swale outside my fence (so the kids would have to ask permission to go get some and be supervised while eating) but now I'm getting a little freaked out (kids do not always listen)...

I haven't tried the hog plums, doubt they are as risky as spanish limes,  its not that I am over protective or anything, but I have heard of so many cases with Spanish limes.  the reason these are such a problem is that the pulp is attached to the seed, so kids will pop em whole in their mouths, and suck on them, not just nibble on them.  next time you eat one, pay attention to how your doing it, if you suck on them you kind of raise the back of your tongue to prevent swallowing it.

anyway I am not saying every kid will choke on these, but they are a higher risk than most fruit.

parents usually tell the kids to eat them without putting them in their mouth, they bite off half the skin part, then use the other half to hold the seed, and tell kids to suck on it that way,  not 100% foolproof, but safer than having it in their mouths while playing and jumping around.

As for the Inga, now that sounds like a fun thing, I got a small tree in April.

My 2.5  and 7 year old love cherry tomatoes, ( Florida tomato ) and miracle fruit.  we also have Jujubes, which are like little apples. my only mango tree with fruits on it is the Ice Cream, with 3 mangoes on it, they already told me which one was theirs when they get ripe, in other words none for daddy :)

last month we had the Grumichamas.

I much prefer them snacking on these things then candies.
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10998
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2012, 12:30:26 AM »
There were other cynics like yourself that said the same thing to me about the possibility of a seedless lychee. In fact there was a geneticist that told me it was "impossible" to have a seedless lychee because an aril needs a seed around which to develop. So much for that theory!
As for ice cream bean, true it doesn't taste like ice cream, i would have named it cotton candy bean. Some people really adore this fruit. For example, look at Adam Gollner's book Fruit Hunters. He said it was the best fruit he ever tasted! The ingas are incredibly multi purpose trees: they fix nitrogen, can be used for alley cropping, grow in the worst of soils, make great shade trees, always with beautiful flowers, the lumber is useable, and on top of that they produce edible pods. Should be much more widely planted in my opinion. Some of the inga species from southern Brazil can also take some cold so would do well in Florida and parts of California.

And where and by whom is all this improvement of this species (spanish lime) taking place?  I suppose if we can get life out of some mix of organic compounds over time as supposedly occurred millions of years ago, spanish limes could become as good as its old world family members.  Might take a long time and will only happen after an extensive program of breeding and selection.  So let the process begin.

Harry

There is some work on Meliccocus being done in PR. Up until recently almost all fruits sold were wild harvested. Now people are starting to plant trees and pay more attention to them. Even if just a freestone fruit could be developed that would be a tremendous improvement. Same thing happened with pulasan, which used to be considered an inferior fruit till freestone cultivars were developed. I tasted some of the improved versions of quenepa in Puerto Rico. They tasted quite nice but were still quite clingstone. This is a potentially very good fruit, it's just been neglected for a very long time, and little improvement done until very recently.
Oscar

Jackfruitwhisperer69

  • Into Fruits, Orchids, Herbs and Veggies!!!
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2304
  • Zone 11b
    • Madeira Island, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2012, 12:26:54 PM »
Hi Katie,
Thanks for sharing with us your trip to Belize :) The fruits look awesome ;)

It's a pity that the inga germinates inside of the pod :'( makes it a bit difficult for the seeds to travel :(
Steven

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5237
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #20 on: July 11, 2012, 01:00:05 PM »
Sorry to take a brief detour off-topic.

Pulasan varieties: Dow, Lee, P1, P3, P36, Sibabat, Unnamed.
Hey Oscar you may know the answer to this question.The above are 7 pulasan varieties assessed at Kamerunga from 1970 to 1987.A further 4 types were evaluated after this as well until 1994 including a purple giant, green meritam and big black.I tried fruit from pretty well all the trees in 1995 just prior to them being chopped down.A couple were virtually seedless with only occasional fruit having seeds and at least half you would call freestone.Do these names and descriptions ring some bells with pulasan types you are seeing in hawaii? Do you know the source of hawaiin pulasans? I am having no luck in trying to find out how many types are still around here and where they are.

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10998
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2012, 07:13:32 PM »
Hi Katie,
Thanks for sharing with us your trip to Belize :) The fruits look awesome ;)

It's a pity that the inga germinates inside of the pod :'( makes it a bit difficult for the seeds to travel :(

Hi Steven, like i mentioned in a previous thread if you pick the pod when it is still a bit green but already filled out then the seeds will NOT be germinated inside. And it's much better to eat at that stage also. The seeds will probably start to germinate en route if longer than 5 days, but that is not a problem at all.
Oscar

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10998
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #22 on: July 11, 2012, 07:15:15 PM »
Sorry to take a brief detour off-topic.

Pulasan varieties: Dow, Lee, P1, P3, P36, Sibabat, Unnamed.
Hey Oscar you may know the answer to this question.The above are 7 pulasan varieties assessed at Kamerunga from 1970 to 1987.A further 4 types were evaluated after this as well until 1994 including a purple giant, green meritam and big black.I tried fruit from pretty well all the trees in 1995 just prior to them being chopped down.A couple were virtually seedless with only occasional fruit having seeds and at least half you would call freestone.Do these names and descriptions ring some bells with pulasan types you are seeing in hawaii? Do you know the source of hawaiin pulasans? I am having no luck in trying to find out how many types are still around here and where they are.

Seebabat is the only one i recognize from your list. There were a bunch of pulasan cultivars trialed here at the experimental station in Hilo but don't have a list of their names.
Oscar

Jackfruitwhisperer69

  • Into Fruits, Orchids, Herbs and Veggies!!!
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2304
  • Zone 11b
    • Madeira Island, Portugal
    • View Profile
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2012, 10:20:58 AM »
It's a pity that the inga germinates inside of the pod :'( makes it a bit difficult for the seeds to travel :(

Hi Steven, like i mentioned in a previous thread if you pick the pod when it is still a bit green but already filled out then the seeds will NOT be germinated inside. And it's much better to eat at that stage also. The seeds will probably start to germinate en route if longer than 5 days, but that is not a problem at all.

Oscar,
That's very clever 8) Pick them green but mature...the seeds will germinate properly...Awesome  8)
Steven

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10998
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: My trip to Belize
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2012, 11:28:33 PM »
Steven, here is a photo of Inga edulis. That is the species that is usually referred to as ice cream bean. The one that Hollywood posted is a totally different species, not ice cream bean. You can see also on my photo that the seeds are not sprouted. Also edulis has different color seeds than the photo posted.
Oscar

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers