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Author Topic: Graft mango question  (Read 1004 times)

Tropicalnut

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Graft mango question
« on: June 27, 2016, 09:56:06 AM »
This question may be clear for many of you, but I havenít found the answer yet.
Does it matter what time of mango do I use to graft another onto it?
For example, if I have a manila grafted mango, can I graft Valencia Pride or Lemon Zest on it?
I know that there are some variations in growth but if I want to top off the manila and just let the scion grow will it make a difference?
I know that there are the Indian family of mangoes and the ones that we get form Mexico. Can those two be put together?
I am just trying to figure out why some of my healthy looking grafts didnít take on a perfectly good manila and one that was turning a bit yellow grafted on a Raposa itís growing.
Used same cleft graft and clean between cuts. Is it luck or what I am doing wrong? Please help! Thanks! Xenia

fyliu

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Re: Graft mango question
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2016, 01:33:37 PM »
They're all compatible. I think it's just luck and timing and skill.

Strong rootstock growth could cause it to reject a graft. I make sure the rootstock growth tip is no higher than the top bud of the scion.

Tropicalnut

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Re: Graft mango question
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2016, 02:21:39 PM »
Thanks for your response. I was trying to post a picture of my other graft but I can't (dont know why because I had done it before) :( there is plenty of space between the tip of the root stock and the tip of the scion, maybe its just my luck. :(

simon_grow

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Re: Graft mango question
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2016, 07:13:42 PM »
The more practice you get with grafting, the better your success rate. Much of it is about timeing like fyliu says. I like to prepare my scions by removing the leaves and waiting for buds to start swelling before grafting.

Unlike fyliu, I have had excellent results with extremely aggressive rootstocks. I simply remove most or all other branches so that the plants best bet is to push the grafted scions. I like to use rootstocks that are showing some sort of growth in progress as this tells me the sap is flowing.

Simon

BahamaDan

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Re: Graft mango question
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2016, 11:18:43 AM »
The more practice you get with grafting, the better your success rate. Much of it is about timeing like fyliu says. I like to prepare my scions by removing the leaves and waiting for buds to start swelling before grafting.

Unlike fyliu, I have had excellent results with extremely aggressive rootstocks. I simply remove most or all other branches so that the plants best bet is to push the grafted scions. I like to use rootstocks that are showing some sort of growth in progress as this tells me the sap is flowing.

Simon

Simon do you remove the branches before you graft the scion to the rootstock, or after you have grafted and the graft has taken but before the scion flushes growth? I have a four year or so mango seedling that I'm thinking of grafting a couple mature scions onto a couple branches of, in order to hopefully get some fruit.

Tropicalnut

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Re: Graft mango question
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2016, 11:59:21 AM »
Thanks Simon; I also removed the branches from my root stock, but I donít have the luxury of waiting for my scion to start to bud before grafting since I get them from other states. :( So I figured the sooner I graft it the better. I guess I just have to be patient and have better luck! :)

simon_grow

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Re: Graft mango question
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2016, 12:59:18 PM »
It depends on the size, age and shape of the rootstock.

I really like to perform epicotyl grafts with newly sprouted seeds as I have excellent results. For other grafts, I consider apical dominance and try to graft as high up as I can. I try to leave as few rootstock branches as possible because they will of course produce fruit of unknown quality.

Simon

Tropicalnut

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Re: Graft mango question
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2016, 05:55:21 PM »
I currently have some mango seeds in water and roots have started to grow. I normally put them in a pot when they have 4 large leaves, but maybe I should just plant them now that they started to show some groth and continue to get some scion wood? I have never tried that method before but seems easy enough. :) I just wish I had someone closer that I could get the scion wood from here AZ.

 

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