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Author Topic: Transplanting Jaboticaba  (Read 2092 times)

phantomcrab

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Transplanting Jaboticaba
« on: August 13, 2016, 08:12:40 AM »
What is the best time of year to dig an established jaboticaba (Grimal) and transplant it to another spot in my yard? The tree is about 3 feet tall.
Richard

simon_grow

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2016, 12:45:11 PM »
I transplanted my Sabara in Summer several years ago and it was fine, even in my dry climate. You can probably transplant it any time of the year with the optimal time being early Spring. I'm not a Jaboticaba expert so hopefully someone else will chime in. Keep your tree well watered after transplanting and you should also trim your tree after transplanting. If you damage a lot of roots during transplanting, trim not of your tree. Just try to avoid transplanting in extreme heat or cold.

Simon

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2016, 02:02:41 PM »
anytime there is no danger of frost is good time (i would give the tree at least 6-8 weeks to get established before danger of a freeze).

I transplanted some large trees (red jabos), and got a freeze of about 29F that killed them...I think the root stress helped to put them on their death bead, but the freeze was the nail in the coffin.

Don

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2016, 01:40:54 AM »
I transplanted a sabara years ago, it was in ground( very poor sandy bush soil ) and transplanted into a large pot. Tree was 3' and I fairly massacred the roots getting it out, put it in the tub with same cruddy soil I dug it out of and just kept water up to it no pruning, it lost all its leaves and regrew them about 6 weeks later. Took ages to get going again maybe 3 years but I imagine if it went straight into good mix you would not see too much detriment to the tree.

phantomcrab

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2016, 06:50:14 AM »
I called Excalibur and was told that supplementally watering the foliage twice daily for 2 months after transplanting would help moderate shock and leaf loss. No preferred time of year was specified.
Richard

bsbullie

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2016, 07:39:23 AM »
As Adam said, as long as no risk of frost you are good to go. 

When digging,  make sure you have a full rootball, dont skino and wind up with roots with no soil or losing soil.  After planting, be sure to give plenty of water daily. To the roots and foliage.
- Rob

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2016, 08:34:06 AM »
I called Excalibur and was told that supplementally watering the foliage twice daily for 2 months after transplanting would help moderate shock and leaf loss. No preferred time of year was specified.

Watering the soil heavily daily and pruning the tree (branch and leaf removal) should be adequate...2 times a day watering foliage isn't necessary

The thing to watch out for is wind damage...I've seen trees that declined after planting because of intense wind.   They had no support (stakes or tree ties) to stabilize the tree....and the roots get stressed, and the tree died.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2016, 08:35:54 AM by FlyingFoxFruits »

bsbullie

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2016, 09:42:31 AM »
I called Excalibur and was told that supplementally watering the foliage twice daily for 2 months after transplanting would help moderate shock and leaf loss. No preferred time of year was specified.

Watering the soil heavily daily and pruning the tree (branch and leaf removal) should be adequate...2 times a day watering foliage isn't necessary

The thing to watch out for is wind damage...I've seen trees that declined after planting because of intense wind.   They had no support (stakes or tree ties) to stabilize the tree....and the roots get stressed, and the tree died.

Any time you move an established tree, keeping the foliage hydrated assists in less stress on the tree (palm trees being more of an exception).  I would definitely spray down the foliage early morning and late afternoon, when watering...especially in our current extreme heat and dry conditions.

And no, I am not the one who gave him the initial advice at Excalibur.
- Rob

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2016, 09:58:15 AM »
u can just remove the some of the foliage by pruning the tree...and it's all the same....as long as u water the heck out of it daily (during hottest part of the day)...of course wet the canopy if possible...but not needed to water the tree twice a day....there is more than one way to skin a cat...

I recommend pruning after transplanting any way...it helps reduce wind damage, because the canopy size is drastically reduced.

for trees that are severely stressed and planted in full sun, i would follow BSbullie advice

I called Excalibur and was told that supplementally watering the foliage twice daily for 2 months after transplanting would help moderate shock and leaf loss. No preferred time of year was specified.

Watering the soil heavily daily and pruning the tree (branch and leaf removal) should be adequate...2 times a day watering foliage isn't necessary

The thing to watch out for is wind damage...I've seen trees that declined after planting because of intense wind.   They had no support (stakes or tree ties) to stabilize the tree....and the roots get stressed, and the tree died.

Any time you move an established tree, keeping the foliage hydrated assists in less stress on the tree (palm trees being more of an exception).  I would definitely spray down the foliage early morning and late afternoon, when watering...especially in our current extreme heat and dry conditions.

And no, I am not the one who gave him the initial advice at Excalibur.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2016, 10:01:37 AM by FlyingFoxFruits »

bsbullie

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2016, 10:08:08 AM »
As the initial post says tree is 3 feet tall, I would not do any pruning.
- Rob

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2016, 11:04:43 AM »
As the initial post says tree is 3 feet tall, I would not do any pruning.

lol, that is no excuse!  I prune the heck out of them at 3ft, especially if it hasn't been pruned regularly! 

Soren

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Re: Transplanting Jaboticaba
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2016, 02:53:22 AM »
Compared to many other species; Jaboticaba transplant easily and in my opinion don't show a lot of stress - follow the suggestions above or transplant during rainy season where air humidity is higher.
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

 

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