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Author Topic: Top these cherimoyas?  (Read 10551 times)

shinzo

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2017, 03:46:05 PM »
If you want good shape, dont let low branches get longer than 12 inches. normally I let it grow 18 inches, then I cut at 12-14 inches, and remove leaf exposing node on either side for it to start branching out.
Sounds good.
So you strip leaves on these even after the spring to encourage more growth?
I started a new garden this year and have 5 cherimoyas that I grafted various varieties onto. Trying to do it correctly from the start using the current best practice. They're all 2-3 ft tall right now.

I just wait for the tree to tell me.  Once I see it discoloring the leaves, I let about half turn yellow so it pulls good energy and then strip them all off.  New growth will be there in no time.
If there is no discoloration you  also strip off the leaves  after pruning the scaffold branches? if so, does it comme off easily without injuring the petiole spot? i have a cherimoya tree at the same stage of spaugh's tree and i am also interested by the detailed technique to shape it correctly.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2017, 03:50:23 PM by shinzo »

spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #51 on: April 14, 2017, 04:19:34 PM »
Regarding dont let them get more than 12" before retrimming I figured I would maybe hit them again in a few months then again at the end of summer.  If these trees grow like my avocados they will be 10ft in 6 months.  Plants seem to grow like crazy here.  Full sun on top of a south facing hill in well draining DG and nice clean groundwater is the recipe for happy plants it seems.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2017, 04:24:53 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #52 on: April 14, 2017, 05:48:07 PM »
By the way what type of fertilizer do cherimoyas need?  High nitrogen citrus/avocado blend ok?  Any special micronutrients they need like zinc?
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #53 on: April 15, 2017, 09:08:08 AM »
Pierce is still king with 30brix



Damn, that thing is dangerous!!!!!!!!  Does it have good acid to offset the high brix?

Again, how does cherimoya do in high heat, like 95 - 102 F for short periods?

johnb51

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #54 on: April 15, 2017, 09:21:17 AM »
I thought they don't like high heat at all, that they prefer cool coastal climates (of Southern California, or high tropical mountain valleys in South America)?
John

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #55 on: April 15, 2017, 09:47:44 AM »
Mark & John

They do very well in 100F temps. We have them fruiting 60-75 miles inland.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #56 on: April 15, 2017, 09:50:17 AM »
I thought they don't like high heat at all, that they prefer cool coastal climates (of Southern California, or high tropical mountain valleys in South America)?

True, but I'm asking SoCal growers how their's fared coming out of the recent heat spells.  It's my understanding you west coast guys had some really warm and hot days the last few years even when it should have been cool/cold.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #57 on: April 15, 2017, 09:52:20 AM »
Mark & John

They do very well in 100F temps. We have them fruiting 60-75 miles inland.

Alright!!!   Plan to install flash nozzle cooling system, just haven't got around to it.

johnb51

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #58 on: April 15, 2017, 10:12:30 AM »
Mark & John

They do very well in 100F temps. We have them fruiting 60-75 miles inland.
That's great.  I wasn't sure. 
John

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #59 on: April 15, 2017, 09:36:57 PM »
If you want good shape, dont let low branches get longer than 12 inches. normally I let it grow 18 inches, then I cut at 12-14 inches, and remove leaf exposing node on either side for it to start branching out.
Sounds good.
So you strip leaves on these even after the spring to encourage more growth?
I started a new garden this year and have 5 cherimoyas that I grafted various varieties onto. Trying to do it correctly from the start using the current best practice. They're all 2-3 ft tall right now.

I just wait for the tree to tell me.  Once I see it discoloring the leaves, I let about half turn yellow so it pulls good energy and then strip them all off.  New growth will be there in no time.
If there is no discoloration you  also strip off the leaves  after pruning the scaffold branches? if so, does it comme off easily without injuring the petiole spot? i have a cherimoya tree at the same stage of spaugh's tree and i am also interested by the detailed technique to shape it correctly.

Mine discolors every year, but if it didn't, the leaves pinch easily and you can prune them off too if you're uncomfortable with peeling them back.  I find once they're expiring, they come off easily.
-Adam

OCchris1

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #60 on: April 17, 2017, 02:46:37 AM »
Spaugh, why plant some Eucalyptus on your borders for wind protection? Most of the Avocado groves east of Irvine have old gum trees planted for just that. It may help to create your own microclimate. Chris
-Chris

spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #61 on: April 17, 2017, 03:08:57 PM »
I could certainly put in eucalyptus for some wind shelter.  I have the cherimoyas and avocados tucked down in a little somewhat sheltered area though.  Id probably have to put in a ton of trees to make a wind break.  And Im in an extreme wildfire alley so eucalyptus isnt the best trees to have in a fire storm.  The sap turns into napalm.  I will try and post more photos of my grow area soon.  Ive got almost an acre deer fenced now.  And half of that is unplanted.  At this point, Im pretty much done planting.  If the cherimoyas do well then maybe I can plant half an acre or so of them for profit.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #62 on: May 16, 2017, 10:47:08 PM »
Someone was asking for photos of the topped cherimoyas.  Here are 4 of my trees all planted over winter and topped a month or 2 ago.  They should pick up the pace when it heats up and they get some fertilizer.  They looked like little dead twigs after takig a harsh winter.







Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #63 on: May 17, 2017, 12:00:54 AM »
Get ready to tip those new growths! Keep your canopy low as the fruiting wood quickly creeps up. Smaller bushy trees are much easier to hand pollinate and harvest.

Simon

fyliu

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #64 on: May 17, 2017, 01:23:16 AM »
Get ready to tip those new growths! Keep your canopy low as the fruiting wood quickly creeps up. Smaller bushy trees are much easier to hand pollinate and harvest.

Simon
How long do you recommend tipping them at these days? I have 5 small plants like this planted in a tight zigzag row that I'm hoping to keep small.

shinzo

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #65 on: May 17, 2017, 03:53:03 AM »
Thanks spaugh for the pics. Mine is also at exactly the same stage after pugging it 45 days ago, so we are on the good pace as a i see.
I am interested also to know the detailed next step. Could we just cut the branches without stripping those healthy green leaves or is it necessary to remove them for letting new branches grow?
 

simon_grow

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2017, 08:24:33 AM »
Get ready to tip those new growths! Keep your canopy low as the fruiting wood quickly creeps up. Smaller bushy trees are much easier to hand pollinate and harvest.

Simon
How long do you recommend tipping them at these days? I have 5 small plants like this planted in a tight zigzag row that I'm hoping to keep small.

I'd probably go about 18-24 inches but it depends on the vigor of the tree and grafted variety. If the tree is vigorous like a Dr White or even a Pierce, I would keep it smaller. The branch highest up and most vertical will usually take over as the central leader so once it shows itself, keep it under control.

Some instances where a dominant branch may not take over is when you severely top an established tree or if the rootstock is less vigorous. When you severely top an established tree, you will get many new water shoots directly beneath the cut and because there are so many and they are so close together, I've noticed that they generally grow at about the same rate. I'm definitely not an Annona expert but I've grown enough monstrous trees to know what one should not do.

Simon

spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #67 on: May 17, 2017, 09:26:42 AM »
Thanks spaugh for the pics. Mine is also at exactly the same stage after pugging it 45 days ago, so we are on the good pace as a i see.
I am interested also to know the detailed next step. Could we just cut the branches without stripping those healthy green leaves or is it necessary to remove them for letting new branches grow?
I think I will just top them again in a month or 2.  Not planning on stripping any leaves off.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #68 on: May 17, 2017, 09:53:06 AM »
I noticed that some of the trees throw out 2 new shoots at each node and others send only one.  The 2nd photo above is a good example.  Does anyone know whats going on with that?  Ahould I thin to one shoot per branch site?
Brad Spaugh

fyliu

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #69 on: May 17, 2017, 01:31:13 PM »
I noticed that some of the trees throw out 2 new shoots at each node and others send only one.  The 2nd photo above is a good example.  Does anyone know whats going on with that?  Ahould I thin to one shoot per branch site?
That's natural. Some growers use that like grapevines to generate renewal branches for fruiting. Have one year old shoot fruit while letting a new one grow to fruit next year. Cut the current fruiting shoot off next year or after 2 years. It keeps the permanent tree small. It's just another idea you could try if you want. Or remove one if it's growing in the wrong direction.

shinzo

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #70 on: June 15, 2017, 08:43:57 AM »
Thanks spaugh for the pics. Mine is also at exactly the same stage after pugging it 45 days ago, so we are on the good pace as a i see.
I am interested also to know the detailed next step. Could we just cut the branches without stripping those healthy green leaves or is it necessary to remove them for letting new branches grow?
I think I will just top them again in a month or 2.  Not planning on stripping any leaves off.
Hi spaugh, just to let you know, i tipped one of my cherimoyas yesterday (similar to yours) and i did strip off 3 leaves below each cut to test the result before doing it to my other cherimoya. The leaves went without any resistance, even though they were perfectly green, i mean no sign of any discolration or aging of the leaves. There is no fiber that can peal off the stem while taking the leave off. So if you were worried about harming the stem (that was my case) when stripping the leaves i can assure you that they just clipp off like a lego piece lol. I hope new branches will grow rapidly from these cuts.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2017, 08:46:51 AM by shinzo »

spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #71 on: June 15, 2017, 11:10:43 AM »
Cool  8)

Mine all look great and starting to really stretch.  They probably need to be pruned again too.




« Last Edit: June 15, 2017, 11:34:15 AM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #72 on: August 30, 2017, 09:06:56 PM »
Updated photo of the cherimoya trees.  They hae taken the recent heat wave well.  For those not growing them, the tips always look droopy.  They have plenty of water and look happy in the heat.  It was over 108 all afternoon yesterday and 105 today.  Trees don't seem to care.

To behlgarden thanks for saying to remove the leaves on nodes after topping.  I tried some branches with and some without doing this and the difference is huge.  The branches with leaves removed start regrowing in just a week or 2.  The others just sit and dont grow.

I planted a few more trees over spring and summer and am up to 9 trees.

Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #73 on: August 30, 2017, 10:41:20 PM »
Your trees look great! You'll be holding cherimoya tastings soon:)

Simon

shinzo

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Re: Top these cherimoyas?
« Reply #74 on: August 31, 2017, 04:25:35 AM »
Nice update Spaugh, your tree looks great, the leaves look like they are bigger than your dog's head!! but i think it is an optical illusion.
Me too i took some pics this morning of my cherimoya that was suffering for its second flush to update my own thread, i will post it later. For my case i think it didn't handle heat as well as your trees, because since i put a shading structure around it, the new leaves started to push greener and bigger.

 

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