Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 494092 times)

SandyL

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 126
    • Nor Cal
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2925 on: July 22, 2019, 03:28:10 PM »
I don't recall if I've ever asked this question but if I did, I'm sorry. I forgot the response
   Well a relative of mine wants to grow some DF in his backyard. The issue is , he lives in Daly Ciry, CA. Just wondering has anyone had any luck growing them over in that area or know if it'll grow there. I think there zone is 10b.
Daly City should be a very good location to grow DF, as it eliminates (mostly) the 2 conditions that inhibit healthy plants....too much heat (103+) and too much cold (34 and below). Costal cities tend to do well with dragon fruit, especially once they are established, as the aerial rooting system lends itself to the foggy mornings. As long as there is no issue with a lack of pollinators in the area (bees, etc.) then the plants should do well once they are past the cutting stage. To get them established, or to root cuttings, a warmer, and sunnier, spot would be preferable, such as against a western facing wall, so the plants can soak up additional heat radiation that the backing surface absorbs. Even a few hours a day on a cheap heating mat will help speed up maturity for newly rooted cuttings. Just make sure the soil has plenty of drainage, Nor Cal winters can be quite wet. Above ground containers/pots are probably preferable.


Thank you so much Rob!! I'll pass the info over to my relative! 😊

I just started growing some in pots in Redwood City (~15 miles away) earlier this year... weather is a bit less temperate than Daly City but mine have been very happily growing several inches a week this summer. 

On a related note, they will probably be 5-6 feet tall by September/October, when it'll start getting cooler and less sunny up here.  I've got a single stem going up - will it start branching out on its own eventually, or should I cut the tip to encourage more lateral growth?  If so, is it better to do that at a certain time of year, or does it not matter?

You should cut the tip off when it gets to the height you want. Then it'll start branching off and you could do that anytime.

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2926 on: July 26, 2019, 07:43:00 PM »
Many DF growers already know this but the newer growers might not be aware that it is advisable to remove the dried up blooms from your DF so that you have less disease spores floating around.

My first DFs are starting to ripen, hopefully they donít get sunburnt too bad from this heat weíre getting.

Simon

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2927 on: July 26, 2019, 08:19:23 PM »
First American Beauty of the year. Many of my fruit have some rotting back by the blossom end because I didnít remove my dried blooms in time. I only just removed them about a week ago. My vines are very old now and I havenít pruned them appropriately.

I highly recommend pruning your older established vines in order to keep production high. I grow my DF in large fabric pots and I used to get a bunch of fruit from each vine but with neglect and lack of pruning, my yield has significantly decreased.

Hereís an American Beauty fruit



First fruit is approximately one pound. The good thing about American Beauty is that the fruit size is very consistent.

Simon

RobPatterson

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
    • Ontario, California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2928 on: July 27, 2019, 03:33:10 PM »
I'm stumped about one of my plant. It's currently 5 ft tall and have 3 buds growing. But I noticed the stems went from plump to skinny. It's the S8. I have another S8 that is about 4 ft tall with 2 buds. But the stems on that on is still plump. Is there a reason why it goes from being plump to skinny. Am I not watering enough? I water them max 2 times a week , sometimes one.
Skinny stems, ones that look more like actual branches and less like 3 sided 'finned' dragon fruit stems are usually caused be a lack of sunlight in my garden. My particular growing scheme means I have a lot of undergrowth if I don't keep things trimmed as much as I should and the new growth that is under eves or the plants canopy, meaning its shaded all day, will grow just as rapidly in length, but they don't have the plumpness to the branch as would be typical. Having said that, the internal woody core of the plant, its main circulatory '"artery" will still be of normal size and growth capacity. Think of it as a skinny kid with normal bones; the plant looks weaker but everything's still working. Now, if you have a main stem or runner that has this going on, as soon as it does manage to get back into a sunny area, it will resume growth normally, so you can allow these types of stems to remain if you want to use them for main runners or to shape your plants. As soon as normal conditions resume, normal growth should follow.
Of course, this is how it works here. It is possible that you might have a situation that, if sunlight isn't the issue, you might be lacking in a particular nutrient that the plant needs for proper development, but that would be on a case by case basis, and you would have to see what works for you. Or just go with an all in one type fertilizer and weed out the problems that way.

SandyL

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 126
    • Nor Cal
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2929 on: July 27, 2019, 06:03:35 PM »
I'm stumped about one of my plant. It's currently 5 ft tall and have 3 buds growing. But I noticed the stems went from plump to skinny. It's the S8. I have another S8 that is about 4 ft tall with 2 buds. But the stems on that on is still plump. Is there a reason why it goes from being plump to skinny. Am I not watering enough? I water them max 2 times a week , sometimes one.
Skinny stems, ones that look more like actual branches and less like 3 sided 'finned' dragon fruit stems are usually caused be a lack of sunlight in my garden. My particular growing scheme means I have a lot of undergrowth if I don't keep things trimmed as much as I should and the new growth that is under eves or the plants canopy, meaning its shaded all day, will grow just as rapidly in length, but they don't have the plumpness to the branch as would be typical. Having said that, the internal woody core of the plant, its main circulatory '"artery" will still be of normal size and growth capacity. Think of it as a skinny kid with normal bones; the plant looks weaker but everything's still working. Now, if you have a main stem or runner that has this going on, as soon as it does manage to get back into a sunny area, it will resume growth normally, so you can allow these types of stems to remain if you want to use them for main runners or to shape your plants. As soon as normal conditions resume, normal growth should follow.
Of course, this is how it works here. It is possible that you might have a situation that, if sunlight isn't the issue, you might be lacking in a particular nutrient that the plant needs for proper development, but that would be on a case by case basis, and you would have to see what works for you. Or just go with an all in one type fertilizer and weed out the problems that way.

Thank you Rob! I think in my case you might be on point that it might be lack of nutrients. I have other varieties planted in the same pot as the other no longer plump S8. They all get full sun. The others are plump but not fruiting. I think you got a point it might be nutrient deficiency possibly by using all it's energy on fruiting and me not having a regular fertilizing schedule. Thanks again!

Anto989

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 122
    • South Italy , calabria region near the tirrenian coast
    • View Profile
    • The exotic farm
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2930 on: August 10, 2019, 06:41:52 AM »
pitaya Dark star;



pitaya cebra

today's flowers

pitaya natural mystic



pitaya bloody mary

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3736
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2931 on: August 10, 2019, 07:14:00 AM »
I know it's been asked before but what are ya'll feeding your faves with?  NPK and micros please.

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2241
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2932 on: August 10, 2019, 01:53:13 PM »
I know it's been asked before but what are ya'll feeding your faves with?  NPK and micros please.

Same as most stuff.  Use a high nitro full package fert until the plants are mature size then switch to a flower bloom high PK full package fert. 

And calcium, gypsum or super triple P or something with Ca.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2019, 01:54:57 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2933 on: August 10, 2019, 08:08:05 PM »
I agree with what Brad said. DF are pretty forgiving when it comes to fertilizers but the important thing is to fertilize because they are heavy feeders in warm weather. Once the vines are large enough to produce, I significantly cut back on Nitrogen and use 3-10-10 with minors and trace. Of the minors and trace, I make sure they get enough Iron, Magnesium and Calcium. My 3-10-10 has enough Zinc and Boron to keep the vines productive year after year.

Hereís my American Beauty growing in a pot with about 50 fruit on it. It used to produce a lot more fruit but itís getting old and I have not performed maintenance pruning because I am remodeling my backyard. I grew this vine on my old deteriorating patio.





Simon

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2241
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2934 on: August 10, 2019, 08:47:20 PM »
I agree with what Brad said. DF are pretty forgiving when it comes to fertilizers but the important thing is to fertilize because they are heavy feeders in warm weather. Once the vines are large enough to produce, I significantly cut back on Nitrogen and use 3-10-10 with minors and trace. Of the minors and trace, I make sure they get enough Iron, Magnesium and Calcium. My 3-10-10 has enough Zinc and Boron to keep the vines productive year after year.

Hereís my American Beauty growing in a pot with about 50 fruit on it. It used to produce a lot more fruit but itís getting old and I have not performed maintenance pruning because I am remodeling my backyard. I grew this vine on my old deteriorating patio.





Simon
did you stand n the shade structure to take that pic?  Fruit looks nice but I would be scared to get up there.  I assume you didnt do any pollinating with the american beautys? 

I got a few new types in fall of last year and have them growing over their 6ft supports and makng flower buds now. 
Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2935 on: August 10, 2019, 10:51:02 PM »
I have to climb up a ladder and balance myself on rotting wood, itís shady and I wouldnít recommend it for those that are prone to falling. I donít hand pollinate any of my DF because Iím too lazy. The bees do all the work for me.

Simon

ricshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1584
    • USA, Southern California, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • ricshaw805 YouTube Channel
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2936 on: August 11, 2019, 12:27:40 AM »
I have to climb up a ladder and balance myself on rotting wood, itís shady and I wouldnít recommend it for those that are prone to falling
I donít hand pollinate any of my DF because Iím too lazy. The bees do all the work for me.
Simon

Easy said when you have compatible or self fertile varieties flowering at the same time.

Lesson learned for newbies with only one or two not self fertile varieties.

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2937 on: August 11, 2019, 08:14:49 AM »
I agree, the more varieties you have, the better the chances of cross pollination and fruit. 

Simon

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3736
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2938 on: August 11, 2019, 08:32:22 AM »
I know it's been asked before but what are ya'll feeding your faves with?  NPK and micros please.

Same as most stuff.  Use a high nitro full package fert until the plants are mature size then switch to a flower bloom high PK full package fert. 

And calcium, gypsum or super triple P or something with Ca.

Thanks, that's pretty much what they're getting via Polyon - 18-4-9 with micros and Ca.  I started those cuttings last year and already got a couple of fruit making now and more blossoms just popped up.

I've got 6 cuttings of Physical Graffiti and 2 of Sugar.  If anyone wants them pay for a medium USPS flat rate box and there yours via PayPal to my email account - PM me. Caveat, they've been sitting on a table in the A/C for about 2 weeks so there's some moisture loss.

Mark







Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3736
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2939 on: August 11, 2019, 08:37:09 AM »
50 fruit, that's just crazy Simon!

I noticed your branches are very light green which suggests more N is needed.  Mine turned that way, almost yellow and are greening up with a very heavy hit of Polyon 18-4-9. 



simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2940 on: August 11, 2019, 04:20:32 PM »
The branches are old, sunburned and in decline. I was going to let the vine die at the end of last season because I knew I would be re modeling and replacing my patio so I would have to get rid of all my DF but I decided to let it Fruit for at least another year.

Once a DF plant reaches full size, I give only enough Nitrogen to support growth of the fruit. I want my vines producing fruit and not more vines. When I gave more Nitrogen to full size vines, like 10-10-10, they produced fruit but also many many branches.

Simon

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3736
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2941 on: August 12, 2019, 08:10:57 AM »
Like my new mangos I'm trying to force plenty of vegetation.  I'll back off the high N food next year.

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3736
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2942 on: August 12, 2019, 09:29:09 AM »
First American Beauty of the year. Many of my fruit have some rotting back by the blossom end because I didnít remove my dried blooms in time. I only just removed them about a week ago.
Simon

Simon, I yanked one of the dried flowers off and the long stigma came with it.  Won't this leave a hole for water entry and rot?  Would it be better to cut the blossom off at the new fruit?

Forester

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 84
    • Crazy gardener from cold Russia ☭
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2943 on: August 12, 2019, 09:49:31 AM »
Hi guys. It may seem strange and stupid, but I grow dragon fruits in Russia. Today I have 11 varieties.
1. American Beauty
2.Bien Hoa Red
3.Bruni
4.Cebra
5.Cosmic Charlie
6.Dark Star
7.Delight
8.Halleys Comet
9.Hana
10.К1
11.Purple Haze
I've been looking for cuttings of the "Yellow Dragon" Selenicereus megalanthus for a long time. Can someone sell me with delivery to Russia?

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3736
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2944 on: August 12, 2019, 10:02:31 AM »
Hi guys. It may seem strange and stupid, but I grow dragon fruits in Russia. Today I have 11 varieties.
1. American Beauty
2.Bien Hoa Red
3.Bruni
4.Cebra
5.Cosmic Charlie
6.Dark Star
7.Delight
8.Halleys Comet
9.Hana
10.К1
11.Purple Haze
I've been looking for cuttings of the "Yellow Dragon" Selenicereus megalanthus for a long time. Can someone sell me with delivery to Russia?

Amazing!  Are you fruiting those in a greenhouse?

Forester

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 84
    • Crazy gardener from cold Russia ☭
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2945 on: August 12, 2019, 10:21:34 AM »
Hi guys. It may seem strange and stupid, but I grow dragon fruits in Russia. Today I have 11 varieties.
1. American Beauty
2.Bien Hoa Red
3.Bruni
4.Cebra
5.Cosmic Charlie
6.Dark Star
7.Delight
8.Halleys Comet
9.Hana
10.К1
11.Purple Haze
I've been looking for cuttings of the "Yellow Dragon" Selenicereus megalanthus for a long time. Can someone sell me with delivery to Russia?

Amazing!  Are you fruiting those in a greenhouse?
This year I grow them in a greenhouse, for the winter I clean them home. This has been going on for 6 years and I have not seen flowers yet, but I still hope.

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2241
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2946 on: August 14, 2019, 09:04:54 PM »
Caught the bee out in a flower around 10pm.  I think maybe he was stuck.

Brad Spaugh

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2947 on: August 14, 2019, 11:57:40 PM »
First American Beauty of the year. Many of my fruit have some rotting back by the blossom end because I didnít remove my dried blooms in time. I only just removed them about a week ago.
Simon

Simon, I yanked one of the dried flowers off and the long stigma came with it.  Won't this leave a hole for water entry and rot?  Would it be better to cut the blossom off at the new fruit?

Hey Mark,

It leaves a hole but we donít overhead water and we rarely get rains at this time of year. Any water that gets into the opening will evaporate. Here is a picture of what it looks like after you remove the dried flower.




Before you remove the flower, make sure it is completely dried up. It should snap right off. Also, when you snap off the dried flower, donít breathe in the dust cloud of spores that usually gets released.

Simon

K-Rimes

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
    • Santa Barbara
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2948 on: August 15, 2019, 01:36:26 PM »
I would think I'd get my DF's totally filled with ants with how many seem to cruise up and down the flowers with a hole like that, but I will try snapping them off if I get fruit set this year.

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5400
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2949 on: August 15, 2019, 01:43:32 PM »
The hole does not expose flesh. It is capped inside the hole similar to how Pomegranates have a cap inside the crown.

Simon

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers