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Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 488632 times)

nullzero

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #475 on: February 27, 2014, 06:18:17 PM »
Am I alone in preferring Opuntia ficus-indica fruit to any of the Hylocereus?

I view them equally as tasty as Dragon Fruit. I think most people shy away from Opuntia sp. fruits, due to the glochids and spines involved. Also the seeds are a major turn off for people.

I have had an excellent Opuntia that had no seeds and had sweet tasty flesh, I ranked it a 9 out of 10.
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ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #476 on: February 27, 2014, 06:21:48 PM »
I have had an excellent Opuntia that had no seeds and had sweet tasty flesh, I ranked it a 9 out of 10.

If it does not have a name...  you could name it "Nullzero" and distribute it and become famous!  ;)

nullzero

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #477 on: February 27, 2014, 07:09:10 PM »
I have had an excellent Opuntia that had no seeds and had sweet tasty flesh, I ranked it a 9 out of 10.

If it does not have a name...  you could name it "Nullzero" and distribute it and become famous!  ;)

Its a PARL #, I have to check my notes (just checked). However there was no cross pollination of other flowers at the time (it was the only flower and fruit).

PARL 244, Flowering 5/26, Fruit Ripe 9/2 (seedless, only fruit) Excellent tasting, sweet honeydew melon taste."
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 07:14:42 PM by nullzero »
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ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #478 on: February 27, 2014, 08:49:09 PM »
Its a PARL #, I have to check my notes (just checked). However there was no cross pollination of other flowers at the time (it was the only flower and fruit).
PARL 244, Flowering 5/26, Fruit Ripe 9/2 (seedless, only fruit) Excellent tasting, sweet honeydew melon taste."

Did you get it from the National Arid Land Plant Genetic Resources Unit?

nullzero

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #479 on: February 27, 2014, 08:52:03 PM »
Its a PARL #, I have to check my notes (just checked). However there was no cross pollination of other flowers at the time (it was the only flower and fruit).
PARL 244, Flowering 5/26, Fruit Ripe 9/2 (seedless, only fruit) Excellent tasting, sweet honeydew melon taste."

Did you get it from the National Arid Land Plant Genetic Resources Unit?

Yes
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

starling1

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #480 on: February 28, 2014, 12:49:52 AM »
Am I alone in preferring Opuntia ficus-indica fruit to any of the Hylocereus?

I view them equally as tasty as Dragon Fruit. I think most people shy away from Opuntia sp. fruits, due to the glochids and spines involved. Also the seeds are a major turn off for people.

I have had an excellent Opuntia that had no seeds and had sweet tasty flesh, I ranked it a 9 out of 10.

Opuntia are very fine fruits, better than DF in most cases, the downside being the high number of small, hard seeds. Similar to guava.

Anybody who can't successfully  use a chef's torch to deal with glochids and spines has no business growing prickly pear. It isn't rocket science.

Recher

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #481 on: February 28, 2014, 02:41:54 AM »
The O. ficus-indica I got is for all practical purposes spine free and glochid-less. Slight glochid but they don't stick in. I bare-hand them.
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nullzero

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #482 on: February 28, 2014, 02:51:30 AM »
Am I alone in preferring Opuntia ficus-indica fruit to any of the Hylocereus?

I view them equally as tasty as Dragon Fruit. I think most people shy away from Opuntia sp. fruits, due to the glochids and spines involved. Also the seeds are a major turn off for people.

I have had an excellent Opuntia that had no seeds and had sweet tasty flesh, I ranked it a 9 out of 10.

Opuntia are very fine fruits, better than DF in most cases, the downside being the high number of small, hard seeds. Similar to guava.

Anybody who can't successfully  use a chef's torch to deal with glochids and spines has no business growing prickly pear. It isn't rocket science.

I have a selection I made call Torrance PCH#1, the fruit can be handled bare hand because the limited amount of glochids blows off with rain and wind over time. I harvested one by hand in FL and it had no glochids on it. Seeds are smaller and softer then usual as well.
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NathanC

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #483 on: February 28, 2014, 06:40:58 PM »
Quote
I have a selection I made call Torrance PCH#1, the fruit can be handled bare hand because the limited amount of glochids blows off with rain and wind over time. I harvested one by hand in FL and it had no glochids on it. Seeds are smaller and softer then usual as well.

Do you think think the glochids would fall off in little rain? I live in AZ, but we do have strong wind. I know that Prickly Pear is a state symbol, but I am interested in a glochid-free or an easy glochid removal variety.

LEOOEL

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #484 on: March 01, 2014, 01:17:08 AM »
After about 3 years from planting, my 'David-Bowie' Dragon Fruit has almost reached the top of the pressure treated pole. The first two years it showed signs of growing pains. The tentacle roots of the plant wouldn't adhere to the pole, perhaps because of chemicals on it. But now, I suppose because the pole has been weatherized, the tentacle roots are adhering to the pole without any support of plastic-tie-wraps.

It's just gone crazy growing and climbing, and of course I'm both surprised and happy about this. I still have to install/build the wood bracket/crown at the top of the pole. I'm eaguerly waiting for it to flower and fruit.
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Ryan

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #485 on: March 01, 2014, 02:53:27 AM »
Question, is it advisable to plant out multiple varieties of pitaya/dragon fruit within close proximity? I'm new to dragon fruit and preparing to plant multiple vines of the smaller orange and yellow pitaya. In addition, I anticipate planting many of the larger fruited varieties in the near future.
In general, is close enough proximity for cross pollination between varieties a good thing or not? Thanks.

IMO it is a good idea to plant more than one variety of Dragon Fruit within close proximity.  Last year I had red flesh Nicaraguan Dragon Fruit that produced dozens of flowers, BUT... I did not have other flowering Dragon Fruit plants to pollinate it.  When I did, I got good tasting fruit. Cross pollination between varieties is a good thing.

Thanks to fyliu, ricshaw and tanguy for the helpful answers to my question. p.s. We do have Hawaiian hoary bats in the area, though I've never seen one. As advised, I'll plan on planting several varieties within close enough proximity for cross pollination.

ekierkla

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #486 on: March 01, 2014, 10:19:12 AM »
If you are trying to grow Opuntia ficus-indica, then get the sicilian Orange type. It is the best. WAY better then any store bought one. It has a nice flavor and grows well. Trust me you will love this cactus.

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #487 on: March 01, 2014, 01:49:18 PM »
If you are trying to grow Opuntia ficus-indica, then get the sicilian Orange type. It is the best. WAY better then any store bought one. It has a nice flavor and grows well. Trust me you will love this cactus.

Got a source?

nullzero

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #488 on: March 01, 2014, 03:34:51 PM »
Quote
I have a selection I made call Torrance PCH#1, the fruit can be handled bare hand because the limited amount of glochids blows off with rain and wind over time. I harvested one by hand in FL and it had no glochids on it. Seeds are smaller and softer then usual as well.

Do you think think the glochids would fall off in little rain? I live in AZ, but we do have strong wind. I know that Prickly Pear is a state symbol, but I am interested in a glochid-free or an easy glochid removal variety.

I can't confirm that because I have no grow reports in AZ. The mother plants location has a low amount of glochids, but the winds never really go over 20mph and the rain is limited. FL plant experienced heavy rains and winds over 40mph.
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ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #489 on: March 07, 2014, 10:08:57 PM »
At the La Verne Nursery tour today, we saw some of the 10,000 unnamed Dragon Fruit being grown for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other West Coast nurseries.

Dragon Fruit cuttings:





Parent stock for cuttings:





Yellow Dragon Fruit (I have not seen for sale in nurseries):



La Verne is experimenting with growing Dragon Fruit from seeds:


nullzero

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #490 on: March 07, 2014, 10:24:05 PM »
Dragon fruit seedlings look very interesting. Could make some great selections on vigor.
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ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #491 on: March 07, 2014, 10:41:56 PM »
Got nopal?

La Verne Nursery does.


thao

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #492 on: March 07, 2014, 11:52:59 PM »
WOW :o

LEOOEL

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #493 on: March 07, 2014, 11:59:15 PM »

La Verne is experimenting with growing Dragon Fruit from seeds:




Wow, La Verne Dragon Fruit Nursery doesn't play around, so far this is the best DF Nursery that I've ever seen. By growing DF from seeds, they are sure to develop new varieties of DF of superb quality and taste, impressive.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 08:18:20 PM by LEOOEL »
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ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #494 on: March 08, 2014, 12:21:12 AM »

Wow, La Verne Dragon Fruit Nursery doesn't play around, so far this is the best DF Nursery that I've ever seen. By growing DF from seeds, they are sure to develop DF of superb quality and taste, impressive.


You think so?    ???

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #495 on: March 08, 2014, 01:45:38 AM »
I asked Daniel Nelson, Director of Operations, about the colorful pot sleeves used on Dragon Fruit and some other plants from La Verne and he said it is up the the retailer... "they cost a lot of money".



IMO they help catch the customer's eye.


franciscu

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #496 on: March 10, 2014, 09:59:22 AM »
"Ice Cream" pitaya?

I found 8 pots of pitaya abandoned and neglected -- obviously for years -- at the back of my lot. Two of them had no labels. The other 6 had labels identifying their varieties as 2 Delights, 1 American Beauty, 1 Halley's Comet, 1 "Red", and 1 "Ice Cream".  I've heard of the first 5, but never heard mention of the "Ice Cream" variety. The plant was in awful shape, with just a couple of half dried out sections with some green left on them. There was some root left and that central woody stalk inside the fleshy part had some green still going.  I've salvaged the last two pieces and stuck them in some moist potting soil and placed them in some mottled shade. If one of them manages to catch hold and produce a new healthy green section I'll try to plant it and see what gives.  I'm intrigued because I've never seen any reference to the Ice Cream variety before. Anybody ever heard of it? Is what I'm doing worth the trouble?

thao

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #497 on: March 10, 2014, 10:15:02 AM »
"Ice Cream" pitaya?

I found 8 pots of pitaya abandoned and neglected -- obviously for years -- at the back of my lot. Two of them had no labels. The other 6 had labels identifying their varieties as 2 Delights, 1 American Beauty, 1 Halley's Comet, 1 "Red", and 1 "Ice Cream".  I've heard of the first 5, but never heard mention of the "Ice Cream" variety. The plant was in awful shape, with just a couple of half dried out sections with some green left on them. There was some root left and that central woody stalk inside the fleshy part had some green still going.  I've salvaged the last two pieces and stuck them in some moist potting soil and placed them in some mottled shade. If one of them manages to catch hold and produce a new healthy green section I'll try to plant it and see what gives.  I'm intrigued because I've never seen any reference to the Ice Cream variety before. Anybody ever heard of it? Is what I'm doing worth the trouble?
Could just be a re name variety? I saw two variety for sale online and they were called "Strawberry Sorbet" and "Raspberry Delight" ??? ::) :D

Doglips

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #498 on: March 12, 2014, 11:05:18 AM »
I really dislike when anything is re-branded for marketing purposes.  It muddies the water as to truth in origin, which I guess is the intent.

NaturalGreenthumb

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #499 on: March 23, 2014, 02:46:59 PM »
Wanted to share my dragon fruit trellis.

While driving down a street I saw a wood frame and as luck would have it I was trying to figure out how I was going to do my dragon fruit trellis.

I have this mostly shady spot on the side of my house, so that's where I'm going to stick it.

I stopped an pick it up and come to release it was a twin bed frame.

I took off the springs. And this is what I got.

4 pillars and a twin bed frame.

Imagine a king or a queen









 

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