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Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 488634 times)

simon_grow

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #675 on: July 12, 2014, 05:33:35 PM »
Here's a pic of Frankies Red flower before it opens.
Simon


dmk

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #676 on: July 13, 2014, 03:47:40 AM »

It's your soil. You've planted it in cactus mix, which is totally wrong for the task of growing dragon fruit.

Dragon fruit are an understory rainforest cactus. They nothing like opuntia or other desert cacti, and require free draining soil that is rich in organic matter. Mix compost, very coarse potting mix, and sand and repot it into this mixture. Add some sheep or cow manure also.

I really don't think it is just the soil. Dragons can grow in majority types of soil and this soil although is not the best still can support a dragon to grow well. Anyways, I would be transferring it to the farm soon where it would get all the necessary nutrients.

As of now would you guys advice to cut the part below the rot or do I just leave it to heal by itself? 

starling1

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #677 on: July 13, 2014, 04:05:09 AM »

It's your soil. You've planted it in cactus mix, which is totally wrong for the task of growing dragon fruit.

Dragon fruit are an understory rainforest cactus. They nothing like opuntia or other desert cacti, and require free draining soil that is rich in organic matter. Mix compost, very coarse potting mix, and sand and repot it into this mixture. Add some sheep or cow manure also.

I really don't think it is just the soil. Dragons can grow in majority types of soil and this soil although is not the best still can support a dragon to grow well. Anyways, I would be transferring it to the farm soon where it would get all the necessary nutrients.

As of now would you guys advice to cut the part below the rot or do I just leave it to heal by itself?

As long as it is in that soil, it will never do well. It's going to die, because they don't like gluggly, or dry, cloying soil. Cutting the rot will do nothing.

fyliu

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #678 on: July 14, 2014, 02:08:29 AM »

It's your soil. You've planted it in cactus mix, which is totally wrong for the task of growing dragon fruit.

Dragon fruit are an understory rainforest cactus. They nothing like opuntia or other desert cacti, and require free draining soil that is rich in organic matter. Mix compost, very coarse potting mix, and sand and repot it into this mixture. Add some sheep or cow manure also.

I really don't think it is just the soil. Dragons can grow in majority types of soil and this soil although is not the best still can support a dragon to grow well. Anyways, I would be transferring it to the farm soon where it would get all the necessary nutrients.

As of now would you guys advice to cut the part below the rot or do I just leave it to heal by itself?
If it doesn't continue to rot, then I would leave it. Soil aeration makes a big difference to root growth. Just make sure the soil particles are coarse enough for the roots to get air.

I'm wondering why you bought such a small plant. How long is the cutting under the soil? It looks like a moon cactus where the top died off. https://www.google.com/search?q=moon+cactus. The bottom is actually a white-fleshed dragonfruit if you care to grow it.
Anyway, you need only bury the bottom inch of it. Some people bury deeper for stability but that's not really necessary.

dmk

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #679 on: July 14, 2014, 03:40:24 AM »
If it doesn't continue to rot, then I would leave it. Soil aeration makes a big difference to root growth. Just make sure the soil particles are coarse enough for the roots to get air.

I'm wondering why you bought such a small plant. How long is the cutting under the soil? It looks like a moon cactus where the top died off. https://www.google.com/search?q=moon+cactus. The bottom is actually a white-fleshed dragonfruit if you care to grow it.
Anyway, you need only bury the bottom inch of it. Some people bury deeper for stability but that's not really necessary.

The rotting seems to have slowed down and the damaged part has become white and soft. I will leave it on as u say.

For better soil aeration, would it matter if it is in a plastic pot or a clay pot?

I got the plant from an online nursery, there was no way to see the plant before purchasing it. It had come in a pot but I'm guessing the cutting may not be more than 2-3 inches deep as the pot itself was about 4 inches tall.

fyliu

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #680 on: July 15, 2014, 03:35:48 AM »
Pot probably doesn't matter. I have mine in plastic.
It'll take longer for your plant to reach fruiting size since it's smaller though.

Rannman

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #681 on: July 15, 2014, 05:28:28 AM »
I grow all of my Dragonfruit in black plastic pots and after earlier problems with the occasional cutting developing rot I changed my tactics. I leave my cuttings high and dry(nowhere near soil) until I see the small root buds start to appear which on some cuttings is 5 months and still waiting. Once the roots start to show, I fill the pot to where I want it, put in a stake and tie the cutting it. The cutting sits on the top of the soil with no green plant below the soil line. Haven't lost 1 yet.

dmk

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #682 on: July 15, 2014, 05:46:40 AM »
@fyliu, Thanks! I am thinking of adding nutrients once the rot subsidies.

@Rannman, That is an interesting tactic. Shall definitely keep in mind to do it that ways. Thank you for sharing with us.

Mucbean

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #683 on: July 15, 2014, 08:00:58 PM »
Whats happening with my dragon fruit (david bowie). They finally had some flowers bloom. But they are turning yellow and dropping off. I have only four flowers remaining.

Thanks, Mike






fyliu

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #684 on: July 15, 2014, 08:12:09 PM »
The plant can decide it's not able to support that many flowers and abort the buds. I've had it happen to a 12 inch cutting that formed about 6 buds. Most fell off and rodents ate the last one.
After flowering, if the pollen doesn't reach the ovary in time, the fruit can abort too. It happens to me even after I pollinated the flowers in the morning. Better to do it the night before, when the flowers first open.

Edited for typo.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2014, 10:30:35 PM by fyliu »

simon_grow

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #685 on: July 16, 2014, 12:47:19 AM »
Here's a picture of a Frankie's Red flower when it's starting to open.
Simon






Treees

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #686 on: July 16, 2014, 05:32:54 PM »
My very first DF harvest from a cutting planted a year ago.  This is Natural Mystic and has been very easy to grow.  Mild but pleasant taste and smell.  Much better than one bought in the store for $5/lb.



Mucbean

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #687 on: July 16, 2014, 06:01:22 PM »
Ok Fyliu, thanks for the info.



LEOOEL

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #688 on: July 16, 2014, 11:42:43 PM »
My 'David Bowie' DF has two big & beautiful flowers for the first time ever, I sure hope that fruit(s) follow(s).

My 'David Bowie' DF is behaving in the same way. The two (first time ever) flowers look dead and are about to fall off. Also, it looks like there may be a fruit coming along behind one of the expired flowers.
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

starling1

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #689 on: July 16, 2014, 11:54:45 PM »
My 'David Bowie' DF has two big & beautiful flowers for the first time ever, I sure hope that fruit(s) follow(s).

My 'David Bowie' DF is behaving in the same way. The two (first time ever) flowers look dead and are about to fall off. Also, it looks like there may be a fruit coming along behind one of the expired flowers.

It's important to taper of watering when the flowers are forming into fruit. Too much water and they will drop them.

cos

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #690 on: July 17, 2014, 04:06:49 PM »
The last 2 years we have had a tremendous increase in earwigs. They are every where but today I noticed that they were especially heavy on ready to bloom flowers.
In the morning I have always found them along with bees in the open flowers. I assume, since they moving very fast all over the inner flower, that they also aid in pollination. If so at least some good from their presents. 



starling1

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #691 on: July 17, 2014, 04:37:55 PM »
The last 2 years we have had a tremendous increase in earwigs. They are every where but today I noticed that they were especially heavy on ready to bloom flowers.
In the morning I have always found them along with bees in the open flowers. I assume, since they moving very fast all over the inner flower, that they also aid in pollination. If so at least some good from their presents. 




Healthy looking plants cos.

I'm currently building a new grove with concrete posts, should  be finished in a couple of weeks.

MassSpectrum

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #692 on: July 17, 2014, 05:09:12 PM »
A semi-local guy brought me several lengths of what he said is "yellow" dragon fruit recently. I expected it'd look different but wasnt sure. Later I went online and all the 'yellow' (species) I could find looked more like a red gene DF, where this one the cactus looks like pure white gene. Interesting though is that one has formed a bud and after a couple days its already yellow:




It seems sturdy enough not like its yellowing to fall off I mean.

If this doesnt make a fruit its going to drive me nuts waiting forever to figure out what it even is, as I wont bother trying to sell/trade with it without having a real good idea.

Dangermouse01

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #693 on: July 17, 2014, 05:27:42 PM »
A semi-local guy brought me several lengths of what he said is "yellow" dragon fruit recently. I expected it'd look different but wasnt sure. Later I went online and all the 'yellow' (species) I could find looked more like a red gene DF, where this one the cactus looks like pure white gene. Interesting though is that one has formed a bud and after a couple days its already yellow:




It seems sturdy enough not like its yellowing to fall off I mean.

If this doesnt make a fruit its going to drive me nuts waiting forever to figure out what it even is, as I wont bother trying to sell/trade with it without having a real good idea.


Doesn't look like buds from my yellow DF.
Bud forming.

In bloom.

Fruit.


I'm thinking your buds will fall off in the next few days.

DM

« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 05:30:09 PM by Dangermouse01 »

cos

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #694 on: July 17, 2014, 05:53:34 PM »
The true yellow fruit, as I know it , is  Selenicereus megalanthus . Close to Hylocereus  species but it & its hybrids have spines on the fruit. From my experience the yellow buds picture above are aborting .
Please keep us up dated; could be new variety? 

MassSpectrum

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #695 on: July 17, 2014, 05:57:05 PM »
I figured that.

ASaffron had the idea that maybe its a rare type inter-species hybrid where the dominant gene are Hylocereus undatus but the skin comes out yellow.

Meanwhile, my 'blue' DF (Hylocereus bronxensis) order came the other day:





And the Pineapple Cactus (Selenicereus setaceus) Thao sent me is jamming already:



And my Sword Pear (Acanthocereus tetragonus) hand pollination attempt appears to have worked:



Can't wait until next year I'll be doing all kinds of crazy xcereus hybrid attempts...
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 06:03:36 PM by MassSpectrum »

MassSpectrum

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #696 on: July 17, 2014, 05:59:19 PM »
The true yellow fruit, as I know it , is  Selenicereus megalanthus . Close to Hylocereus  species but it & its hybrids have spines on the fruit. From my experience the yellow buds picture above are aborting .
Please keep us up dated; could be new variety?

Dude seemed real cool, real legit. He got it from some lady in Orlando apparently her garage is completely covered over with the stuff. Talked to him since he claims hes going to go back there and get me photos of the flowers/fruits.

starling1

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #697 on: July 17, 2014, 06:11:25 PM »


There is a spineless yellow however it lacks the flavor of the spined kind, and is about the same quality as the standard store-bought whites.

MassSpectrum

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #698 on: July 17, 2014, 06:22:01 PM »
Here's what the 'yellow' cactus itself looks like:



Here's an example of a undatus dominant gene:


fyliu

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #699 on: July 17, 2014, 07:24:48 PM »
Isn't lack of color and albino-ism usually a recessive gene or a genetic defect? Hehe.
The yellow undatus is/was a patented variety from Israel. Supposedly, wild plant do exist that turn that color. I'm not sure the results of that patent challenge.
Anyway, it looks like your yellow fruit is the kind that'll fall off in the coming week. Not sure if I want to be eighties wrong about it, since that yellow undatus fruit is said to be mediocre.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 07:32:19 PM by fyliu »

 

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