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Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 494720 times)

shaneatwell

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #875 on: October 15, 2014, 10:03:52 PM »
That's a fantastic looking setup!
Shane

MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #876 on: October 15, 2014, 10:14:20 PM »
Thanks for the kind words.  I wanted to give a decent look with making it practical.  Everything was on the fly as I didn't have any idea from the beginning. hehe.

simon_grow

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #877 on: October 16, 2014, 02:44:44 AM »
Thanks for the kind words.  I wanted to give a decent look with making it practical.  Everything was on the fly as I didn't have any idea from the beginning. hehe.

That was on the fly! Can you come to my house, your handy work is amazing. You should be getting lots of fruit in 1-2 years. What varieties did you plant?
Simon

Mark in Texas

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #878 on: October 16, 2014, 08:36:49 AM »
Incredible, very classy!

gunnar429

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #879 on: October 16, 2014, 10:07:19 AM »
I have to copy that.  Wow, great job!!
~Jeff

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MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #880 on: October 16, 2014, 12:33:57 PM »
Thanks for the kind words.  I wanted to give a decent look with making it practical.  Everything was on the fly as I didn't have any idea from the beginning. hehe.


That was on the fly! Can you come to my house, your handy work is amazing. You should be getting lots of fruit in 1-2 years. What varieties did you plant?
Simon


Hahaha.  Thanks for the compliment.  The brand new miter saw was collecting dust so I decided to put it to use.  At first, I knew I had to create a box around it so that the top stem could hang downward.  And then I started to add additional pieces to help support it and make it a "pergola" like.  It took me about 2 weeks to complete the project since I had to it all by myself. 

I don't know what type of dragon fruit I have because I'm not familiar with the names.  But, I do notice I have about 3 different kinds.  All my cuttings came from my mom in Southern CA.

Here is a picture of my first dragon fruit from 3 years ago on the opposite side of the house.  I put a 30% shade cloth on top to prevent it from yellowing the stems.  It helps a lot...  We were getting 85 - 95 degree temperature last month.  I had the cloth on the new setup as well.  The new stems couldn't handle the direct sun over 85 degrees. 


« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 12:40:58 PM by MayBee »

MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #881 on: October 16, 2014, 12:35:27 PM »
Incredible, very classy!

I have to copy that.  Wow, great job!!

Thanks for the compliments.  Let me know if you need to know what items I used or steps I did...  I added concrete to all the leg posts to prevent the water from rotting it overtime.  Also, I applied bee wax around the redwood.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 12:45:14 PM by MayBee »

gunnar429

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #882 on: October 16, 2014, 01:39:19 PM »
yes, please send the directions, either pm, email, or post
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

ClayMango

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #883 on: October 16, 2014, 03:23:59 PM »
Thanks for the kind words.  I wanted to give a decent look with making it practical.  Everything was on the fly as I didn't have any idea from the beginning. hehe.


That was on the fly! Can you come to my house, your handy work is amazing. You should be getting lots of fruit in 1-2 years. What varieties did you plant?
Simon


Hahaha.  Thanks for the compliment.  The brand new miter saw was collecting dust so I decided to put it to use.  At first, I knew I had to create a box around it so that the top stem could hang downward.  And then I started to add additional pieces to help support it and make it a "pergola" like.  It took me about 2 weeks to complete the project since I had to it all by myself. 

I don't know what type of dragon fruit I have because I'm not familiar with the names.  But, I do notice I have about 3 different kinds.  All my cuttings came from my mom in Southern CA.

Here is a picture of my first dragon fruit from 3 years ago on the opposite side of the house.  I put a 30% shade cloth on top to prevent it from yellowing the stems.  It helps a lot...  We were getting 85 - 95 degree temperature last month.  I had the cloth on the new setup as well.  The new stems couldn't handle the direct sun over 85 degrees. 





How bad is this yellowing issue? we get up to 105 here in temecula... and the last heat wave turned quite a bit of the dragon fruit i recently planted yellow... is it still ok?
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ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #884 on: October 16, 2014, 03:28:14 PM »
How bad is this yellowing issue? we get up to 105 here in temecula... and the last heat wave turned quite a bit of the dragon fruit i recently planted yellow... is it still ok?

I picked fruit today on a Dragon Fruit plant with heavy "yellowing issue".

ClayMango

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #885 on: October 16, 2014, 03:32:16 PM »
How bad is this yellowing issue? we get up to 105 here in temecula... and the last heat wave turned quite a bit of the dragon fruit i recently planted yellow... is it still ok?

I picked fruit today on a Dragon Fruit plant with heavy "yellowing issue".


OK,

Because the area they're are planted in receives full sun...It looks like everything is growing fine...but the yellowing did scare me.
Thinking about joining a Fruitaholics anonymous support group...Fruit addiction has taken over my life!

MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #886 on: October 16, 2014, 05:51:38 PM »
Thanks for the kind words.  I wanted to give a decent look with making it practical.  Everything was on the fly as I didn't have any idea from the beginning. hehe.


That was on the fly! Can you come to my house, your handy work is amazing. You should be getting lots of fruit in 1-2 years. What varieties did you plant?
Simon


Hahaha.  Thanks for the compliment.  The brand new miter saw was collecting dust so I decided to put it to use.  At first, I knew I had to create a box around it so that the top stem could hang downward.  And then I started to add additional pieces to help support it and make it a "pergola" like.  It took me about 2 weeks to complete the project since I had to it all by myself. 

I don't know what type of dragon fruit I have because I'm not familiar with the names.  But, I do notice I have about 3 different kinds.  All my cuttings came from my mom in Southern CA.

Here is a picture of my first dragon fruit from 3 years ago on the opposite side of the house.  I put a 30% shade cloth on top to prevent it from yellowing the stems.  It helps a lot...  We were getting 85 - 95 degree temperature last month.  I had the cloth on the new setup as well.  The new stems couldn't handle the direct sun over 85 degrees. 





How bad is this yellowing issue? we get up to 105 here in temecula... and the last heat wave turned quite a bit of the dragon fruit i recently planted yellow... is it still ok?


I put the shade on as soon as I see yellowing on the stem.  Afterward, I added 1 teaspoon of epsom salt with 1 gallon of water.  I did noticed it turning back to green. 

I have relatives in Temucula.  I know it gets 95-100 degree constantly.  They put those big dead leaves from their palm tree on top of the dragon fruit stems to give it shade.  If I were you, then I would shade the recent planted ones from the sun.  It's still young and growing.  Personally me, I just don't like it being yellow in color.  I don't think it will bear any "new" fruit with the yellow stems in the future.  I'm not sure since I tend to throw away the yellow ones.  I have seen fruit in a yellow stem, but the fruit came out before the yellowing.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 05:53:23 PM by MayBee »

MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #887 on: October 16, 2014, 06:13:16 PM »
yes, please send the directions, either pm, email, or post

I'll try my best to explain it here...  I'm sure you can find better ways of building it...

1.  buy 10 inch pvc pipe, redwood 4x2 size, screws, concrete post mix (fast drying product...like 5 minutes)
2.  cut the 10 inch pvc pipe about 1 ft long.
3.  dig the holes about 1 ft deep
4.  put the pvc pipe in the hole and level the pvc pipe
5.  cover the surrounding with the dirt and pound it down so it doesn't move.
6.  add 1 inch of concrete mix inside the pipe and then add water....and stir it up for 1 minute. 
7.  add the redwood post in the center of the pvc pipe.
8.  add more concrete and water and mix again.  repeat the process.
9.  make sure to level the post with every mix so it doesn't move.
10.  repeat the process above for all the posts.
11.  after all posts are aligned, measure about 5 ft from bottom to top.  mark the measurement on every post.
12.  user the miter saw to cut the square beam for support for each post.  Screw all 4 corners around the post together.  This allow me to put a wood on top of the square by myself.  In some areas, a clamp comes in handy.
13.  now, start measuring and cutting all the woods on top with screws. 
14.  I was picky so I was leveling everything I did to make sure it was straight
15.  at the end, I bought some bee wax from homedepot and applied it to the wood. 
16.  The purpose of the top layer wood is to add a clear poly sheet on top during the winter to help it from the frost.  (very important in my area to protect it from winter frost or else it's dead).

I think that's pretty much it.  The rest is all about cosmetics...depending on how you want it to look.

I hope that gives you an idea to start on your trellis :)

« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 06:20:01 PM by MayBee »

lajolla

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #888 on: October 16, 2014, 06:31:57 PM »
is it possible to shade the dragon fruit and still get fruit? as in grown under a shade tree with partial sun during the day?

MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #889 on: October 16, 2014, 06:57:01 PM »
is it possible to shade the dragon fruit and still get fruit? as in grown under a shade tree with partial sun during the day?

It's possible, but the fruit is small.  It needs sun.   I have a friend who put them under a shack with very little sun and the stems are thin and the fruits are like 2 inches long.  I think people who live in area with 90+ degree everyday and the dragon fruit gets 8+ hours of direct sun, then expect the stem to turn yellow.   Use the 30% shade depending on your sun condition.  I take mine off when the temperature is 85 and below.   With temperature in the 90-100+, the 30% reduce the direct sunlight a lot.  The plant still get plenty of sun with the 30% shade.

Search on ebay for "30% shade cloth".

I have attended the dragon fruit festival last year in Irvine.  They have no shade at all...only a net on top to prevent the bird from coming in.  They get full sun in the wide open field.  I didn't see too many healthy green stems from their fields.  Most of them were pretty beat up with yellowing and browning, tons of ants, but they did have plenty of fruits.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 07:05:14 PM by MayBee »

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #890 on: October 16, 2014, 10:48:01 PM »
is it possible to shade the dragon fruit and still get fruit? as in grown under a shade tree with partial sun during the day?

At BOTH the last 2014 Pitahaya/Dragon Fruit Festival and the MVP Farms Pitahaya/Dragon Fruit Field Day we were told to grow Dragon Fruit in sun for fruit and in the shade if you want to sell cuttings. So yes, it is possible to grow DF in the shade and get some fruit.

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #891 on: October 16, 2014, 11:10:18 PM »
Armando and La Verne nursery H. polyrhizus taste test.

Today my wife and I did a taste comparison of two Dragon Fruit I picked today.

I chilled both fruit in the refrigerator.

The larger and best looking fruit came from a 'no name' variety grown by La Verne nursery.



This is the fruit a couple of days ago (note the yellow stem).



The other fruit came from my Armando DF. 

Both need a pollinator. I know, the La Verne label above says does not need a pollinator. I used pollen from a Delight flower.



The larger La Verne fruit on the Left weighed almost 1 1/2 pounds (23 oz.)



Both tasted very good.



The La Verne tasted sweet (I have ordered a BRIX meter  :(), the Armando was sweet with a more tart taste.

I liked the taste of the La Verne best, my wife like the taste of Armando best.

« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 11:13:10 PM by ricshaw »

xshen

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #892 on: October 17, 2014, 12:42:34 AM »
Richsaw, is this the same H. polyrhizus you sent me a few months back along with armando?  Both are doing great and I gave some cuttings away a few months ago.

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #893 on: October 17, 2014, 12:51:59 AM »
Richsaw, is this the same H. polyrhizus you sent me a few months back along with armando?  Both are doing great and I gave some cuttings away a few months ago.

Yes.

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #894 on: October 17, 2014, 01:56:29 AM »

The larger and best looking fruit came from a 'no name' variety grown by La Verne nursery.



For those who do not live on the West Coast, this is what the Dragon Fruit plant looked like when I bought it from Lowe's.




ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #895 on: October 18, 2014, 01:30:52 PM »
My friend Mark recently posted this YouTube video;

Orejona Dragon Fruit


ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #896 on: October 20, 2014, 01:31:32 PM »
Mark has posted another video.

Let's Talk Dragon Fruit with Edgar Valdivia.


gunnar429

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #897 on: October 20, 2014, 01:39:11 PM »
Hello Everyone,

It's nice to see pictures of everyone's Dragon Fruits.

I would like to share a picture of my setup.  I hope you enjoy the pictures.

Surprisingly, I had about 5 flowers within 6 months of planting, but only 3 of them going to survive in a fruit form.

Here is a picture when I started planting them from stem cutting on 04/07/2014:



Here is a picture of it 2 months later on 06/13/2014:



Here is a picture of adding the post on 07/13/2014:



Here is a picture of the posts standing up on 07/16/2014:



Here is a picture of 90% of it being completed on 07/20/2014:




And here is a picture of it today with the second layer on top for the shade 6 months later on 10/15/2014:




I just noticed that the DF are in black trash barrels.  I plan on doing something similar, and filling in the bottom section with fruiting shrubs. 
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #898 on: October 20, 2014, 01:58:15 PM »
ricshaw,

Nice info video.

MayBee

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #899 on: October 20, 2014, 02:14:17 PM »


I just noticed that the DF are in black trash barrels.  I plan on doing something similar, and filling in the bottom section with fruiting shrubs.

Yes, I used the 20 gal barrel from Home Depot. It was made from recyclable material that is food safe.  Google on recycle numbers for plastic.  There are certain recycle numbers that you should avoid using.  With any planting pots, you should look at the recycle number before using them. 

Several reasons why I went with the 20 gal barrel because it's long enough to hold the 4 inch pipe in the center and to deter gofer from eating the root.  I have gofer problem because I can see the gofer pushing my soil up in the section where I planted them on the ground.  Also, I have mostly rocks behind the retaining wall.  Make sure you dig holes underneath in the barrel if you plan to use the barrel.

I wouldn't recommend leaving the barrel in a wide open area.  Why?  It gets HOT during the summer, especially black absorbs heat so much.  It can damage the root system :)  I have a relative who use a barrel in a wide open area, exposing it to the sun.  The barrel started cracking, creating holes already.  I think the UV from the sun has damage the barrel. 
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 02:17:19 PM by MayBee »

 

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