Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 397248 times)

ricshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1530
    • USA, Southern California, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • ricshaw805 YouTube Channel
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2750 on: August 20, 2018, 12:35:01 PM »
I hand pollinated my purple haze, but the last 3 flowers just turn yellow and die a few days after the flower closed. Any idea what could be the problem? My Natural Mystic are doing fine, only one turn yellow after hand pollinate.

What pollen did you use to hand pollinate your Purple Haze flowers?

I tried using its own pollen (it's supposed to be self pollinate: https://www.tropicalfruitnursery.com/variety-selected-name-purple-haze--informacion-52)
I also tried to use pollen from Natural Mystic. I saved the Natural Mystic pollen in a plastic container and froze for 2 days, thaw at room then used the pollen.

The first 2 Purple Haze fruit I got in June was hand pollinated with their own pollen since my Natural Mystic didn't have flower back than.

"Purple Haze" is a name given to Paul Thomson's 5-S, a hybrid from a Dragon Fruit Netitzel X Rixford” cross, which Paul said has dark red or magenta flesh, flavor good – very good.
Paul also said; All of the seedlings from his “Netitzel X Rixford” cross must be cross pollinated to set fruit. Other hobbyist growers agree.

TheWaterbug

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 335
    • Palos Verdes, CA, Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783'
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2751 on: August 20, 2018, 01:13:51 PM »
"Purple Haze" is a name given to Paul Thomson's 5-S, a hybrid from a Dragon Fruit Netitzel X Rixford” cross, which Paul said has dark red or magenta flesh, flavor good – very good.
Paul also said; All of the seedlings from his “Netitzel X Rixford” cross must be cross pollinated to set fruit. Other hobbyist growers agree.



Here's a previous post by Ric showing the various "#-S" lineages. So is S-8 Sugar Dragon truly a universal pollinator? Is there anything that it _won't_ pollinate?
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

RobPatterson

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
    • Ontario, California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2752 on: August 20, 2018, 06:41:50 PM »
S-8 pollinates everything its been exposed to, as far as im aware, including itself. Its small sized fruit has made growers hesitant to include it in their collections, but aqs far as Im concerned, its my favorite variety. Its very sweet, nicely sized for snacking, and is very versatile for making preserves, ice cream and Ive made some really nice cooking glazes with it, and plan on experimenting more with it this holiday season. Every grower, who has space, of course, should include at least one of these plants in their collection, if for no other reason the bonuses to pollinating and fruit production the abundant S-8 flowers provide.

shafak

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 277
    • India, Chennai 13°N 80°E Köppen: Aw Elevation 6 m (20 ft)
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2753 on: August 21, 2018, 08:36:16 AM »
Is there any other alternative if I have a similar stub of a vine, but no rootstock to graft on to?

A friend of mine bought a giant Yellow Megalanthus DF from 99 Ranch market and it had a stub of a vine so he grafted it onto another DF rootstock. Shortly after the graft, he noticed new growth from the stub. Here are some pictures

Simon

shafak

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 277
    • India, Chennai 13°N 80°E Köppen: Aw Elevation 6 m (20 ft)
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2754 on: August 21, 2018, 08:41:57 AM »
Any update on your trial, Sandy?

Thanks!
I was surprised myself to find one with a niece piece of the stem still attached.
I'm going to try to root the cutting, since I'm not that experienced with the latter of the 2 methods.
The fruit itself was still sweet and delicious even though the skin had lots more green than the ones I usually purchased.
I'm going to be looking to see if I can find more with the same size stem I got this time around to try the grafting method.
Crossing my fingers and hope I find more.
I think the cashier thought I was crazy to have bought such green fruit...lol


simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4715
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2755 on: August 21, 2018, 08:56:45 AM »
A friend of mine bought a giant Yellow Megalanthus DF from 99 Ranch market and it had a stub of a vine so he grafted it onto another DF rootstock. Shortly after the graft, he noticed new growth from the stub. Here are some pictures







Simon

Here is an update of the graft my friend did.


Simon

kc_moses

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
    • Lake Worth, FL, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2756 on: August 21, 2018, 01:27:22 PM »


I tried using its own pollen (it's supposed to be self pollinate: https://www.tropicalfruitnursery.com/variety-selected-name-purple-haze--informacion-52)
I also tried to use pollen from Natural Mystic. I saved the Natural Mystic pollen in a plastic container and froze for 2 days, thaw at room then used the pollen.

The first 2 Purple Haze fruit I got in June was hand pollinated with their own pollen since my Natural Mystic didn't have flower back than.

"Purple Haze" is a name given to Paul Thomson's 5-S, a hybrid from a Dragon Fruit Netitzel X Rixford” cross, which Paul said has dark red or magenta flesh, flavor good – very good.
Paul also said; All of the seedlings from his “Netitzel X Rixford” cross must be cross pollinated to set fruit. Other hobbyist growers agree.

Thanks! I looked at my Purple Haze (5-S?) tree, there are about 12 flower buds forming now, I will monitor and see if they're self pollinating because my Natural Mystic is done at the moment and there is no other DF around to pollinate the Purple Haze.

Rannman

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 210
  • Dragonfruit collector
    • Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2757 on: August 25, 2018, 05:28:52 AM »





Sugar Dragon keeps on impressing me! It’s the last week of winter, insanely dry,  with temps in the last week down to 0 degrees Celsius and my Sugar Dragon plants have decided to start flowering! This variety has survived on rain for the last 5 months(very little), temps down to -2.5 Celsius and continued to flourish, while also not being attacked and consumed from within by cactoblastis, which is making a mess of quite a few varieties . Over 30 flower buds on 8 two year old plants! Not a bad effort!

Brandon909

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • Ontario, California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2758 on: August 25, 2018, 12:44:39 PM »





Sugar Dragon keeps on impressing me! It’s the last week of winter, insanely dry,  with temps in the last week down to 0 degrees Celsius and my Sugar Dragon plants have decided to start flowering! This variety has survived on rain for the last 5 months(very little), temps down to -2.5 Celsius and continued to flourish, while also not being attacked and consumed from within by cactoblastis, which is making a mess of quite a few varieties . Over 30 flower buds on 8 two year old plants! Not a bad effort!
That's why it's one of my favorite varieties they're tuff and always producing

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1385
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2759 on: August 26, 2018, 07:09:39 PM »
I have about 8 posts in the ground at my place. Most are stainless steel or galvanized steel from a metal recycler place in Chula Vista. They are about 8-10 feet tall, I dig a 3 foot hole and fill with concrete and then at the top drill holes and place two pieces of rebar to form a cross covered with irrigation hose. They have lasted many years. I do have one or two 4 inch thick redwood posts that I did the same way. Here is a photo of one of the 

Mark I decided metal is easier to deal with.  I got the posts at lowes and use redwood 2x4 for the tops and 1/2" rebar.  Ordered some bulk coco liner for the posts.  Got about half of the holes dug.  Hoping these last a long time..  Glad you recommended metal, much easier than pouring concrete and making molds, carrying them.


« Last Edit: August 26, 2018, 07:11:47 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Seanny

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
    • Garden Grove, Orange County, California, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2760 on: August 27, 2018, 11:14:31 PM »
Rebar is not stiff enough. I've seen design like yours drooped.

Do you put nuts at end?

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1385
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2761 on: August 27, 2018, 11:30:37 PM »
They probably used the thinner rebar.  If it becomes a problem I guess I could use even thicker rebar but seems excessive.  Seems like its working for a lot of people.  I already have a few in use also. 
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3362
    • Fredericksburg Texas, (central TX), zone 8a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2762 on: August 28, 2018, 08:39:23 AM »
I have about 8 posts in the ground at my place. Most are stainless steel or galvanized steel from a metal recycler place in Chula Vista. They are about 8-10 feet tall, I dig a 3 foot hole and fill with concrete and then at the top drill holes and place two pieces of rebar to form a cross covered with irrigation hose. They have lasted many years. I do have one or two 4 inch thick redwood posts that I did the same way. Here is a photo of one of the 

Mark I decided metal is easier to deal with.  I got the posts at lowes and use redwood 2x4 for the tops and 1/2" rebar.  Ordered some bulk coco liner for the posts.  Got about half of the holes dug.  Hoping these last a long time..  Glad you recommended metal, much easier than pouring concrete and making molds, carrying them.



Nice job!  1/2" rebar will take about any weight and I've had no problem with 3/8" rebar for many load situations. 

Time for me to get some kind of trellis going.  I put the Physical Graffiti and Santa Barbara red on the right in about March, has grown about 5'.  Cuttings on the left are Sugar pitaya, one prone (which is still dormant) and 2 upright.  Man does that one take forever to root and push.  The Frankie's Red cutting looks great but hasn't pushed. 


« Last Edit: August 28, 2018, 08:41:22 AM by Mark in Texas »

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1385
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2763 on: August 28, 2018, 02:02:38 PM »
DF definitely get really heavy.  I might throw a 3rd rebar in there since Seanny says its not enough.  Seanny post some photos of your supports if you can.  Im always open to new ideas.  And I will be making more supports in the future.
Brad Spaugh

TheWaterbug

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 335
    • Palos Verdes, CA, Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783'
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2764 on: August 28, 2018, 02:37:58 PM »
I build my trellises out of redwood 2 x 4s and 4 x 4s. I don't set them in the ground; I put them on 1' x 1' concrete pavers so that I can move them around if necessary:



Design and drawings are here.


Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

TheWaterbug

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 335
    • Palos Verdes, CA, Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783'
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2765 on: August 28, 2018, 02:47:36 PM »
Here's the vine that's closest to the street. I'm calling this the "A" vine.



The vines in that Lomita Dragonfruit Park are going pop tonight or Sunday night. Anyone want to sneak in with me and steal some pollen?

Or maybe sneak in and pollinate a few dozen flowers?



I just couldn't stand to see all these flowers drop, so I went there around 10:00 PM last week and pollinated one. I couldn't reach any others without a taller ladder.


Here is it, 10 days after pollen donation. It appears to have been successful!

Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1385
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2766 on: August 28, 2018, 10:35:13 PM »
DF definitely get really heavy.  I might throw a 3rd rebar in there since Seanny says its not enough.  Seanny post some photos of your supports if you can.  Im always open to new ideas.  And I will be making more supports in the future.

My neighbor and I both hung off one of the supports like monkeys today.  400lbs combined weight and the rebars didnt budge. 
Brad Spaugh

Seanny

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
    • Garden Grove, Orange County, California, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2767 on: August 28, 2018, 11:35:23 PM »
Tested. So it's good to go.
I'll snap a picture of the failed one later.

RobPatterson

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
    • Ontario, California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2768 on: August 29, 2018, 12:02:07 AM »
I'd add either some roofing tar or other coating on the part you intend to bury, to retard rust. The regular addition of fertilizers can make the soil, or even post set concrete, a bit more corrosive. If you really want to go the extra step, when you dig your hole, put about 2 inches of gravel at the bottom before you set or pour concrete, but try not to drive the post down through it. Leave it sitting on the gravel. This will allow any moisture that gets into the post, or penetrates the concrete/post seam to drain and not hang out directly in contact.

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1385
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2769 on: August 29, 2018, 12:04:53 AM »
Tested. So it's good to go.
I'll snap a picture of the failed one later.

Hopefully.  The rebar may be good now but a few years of rust could make it fail.  So I will probably hit them with some rustoleum and seal thewood parts and hope for the best.  I have a bunch of horse panels that would work also but no great places to set them up.
Brad Spaugh

Rannman

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 210
  • Dragonfruit collector
    • Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2770 on: September 01, 2018, 05:29:26 AM »
An interesting technique for grafting dragonfruit that I found on instagram. https://www.instagram.com/p/Bi_F6IMDpse/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=1836xqta0zb58

If you check out his page, you will see a pretty mad yellow skinned dragonfruit called ‘Rainbow’. Red flesh apparently !
« Last Edit: September 01, 2018, 05:33:53 AM by Rannman »

Brandon909

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • Ontario, California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2771 on: September 02, 2018, 11:03:58 PM »
Does anyone know how to effectively dry and store pollen for Dragon fruit?

RobPatterson

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
    • Ontario, California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2772 on: September 03, 2018, 12:01:49 PM »
Does anyone know how to effectively dry and store pollen for Dragon fruit?
Here's the simple version of my process:
1. Use some sort of object you can insert into the flower, without damaging it, as far in as you can get it, and tap on the flowers stem to dislodge the pollen. I have an ice scoop that I've cut and reshaped to fit the flowers geometry, but another good idea Ive hear is to take a 1 litre soda or water bottle, and basically cut half the body of it out to form a scoop, then trim whats left of the body into a point, with a curved tip (no sharp or pointy edges), so it had a triangular shape.
2. Dump your pollen onto a white, or other lightly colored, plate so you can go through it and dig out anything that isnt pollen, like ants, flower parts, etc. Use tools like tweezers or sewing needles. Avoid touching the pollen directly.
3. Spread your pollen out on a folded paper towel or a napkin, not in clumps, but as an even powder. Place it somewhere shady, not in direct sunlight, but warm, and let it sit for 8-24 hours. Beware of strong drafts that might blow your pollen off its resting surface.
4. Place the towel/napkin back on your plate, fliped over, and pat/flick the dried pollen back onto the plate surface. Reexamine for anything not pollen. At my house its usually cat hair.
5. Here's the important part. Using as small of a container as possible, you can now store your pollen in your freezer. The colder the better. But the container is key. I have small sample vials I picked up from Ebay that I use. The idea is that you was as little air in with the pollen as possible. For a single flower, using something like the glass tubes free perfume samples used to come in would be a good size. Whatever you find, the container needs to be as small as you can find and air tight. Oh, and clean, too. Any moisture in the air can degrade the pollen when ice crystals form.
This process should give you pollen that will last a couple weeks in storage.

cmichael258

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
    • St. Pete, Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2773 on: September 03, 2018, 12:45:27 PM »
Triple bloom last night.


Michael

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1385
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2774 on: September 04, 2018, 01:01:14 PM »
Heres some photos of the posts and some flowers

We've been eating the S8s and they are like crack.  No one can get enough of them.  They have that awesome floral grape flavor and very sweet and crunchy.  So delicious.








Brad Spaugh

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers